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MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Mother Goose, a specia event, is at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Healthy Living with Chronic Pain Workshop is at 9:30 a.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Magician Eric Giliam performs at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

MUSD Board Meeting is at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Unified School District, 44150 W. Mariccopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

The Princess, the Unicorn and the Smelly Foot Troll, a special event, is at 3 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Grand Opening is at 3 p.m. at Pioneer Title Agency, 21596 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 101.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

ONYX Young Choreographers Showcase is at 3 p.m. at Maricopa Performing Arts Center, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

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Photo by Victor Moreno

Maricopa High School football players tried out their summer skills in a 7-on-7 contest against Mesa June 21. Mesa will host the Rams June 28 at 6 p.m. Photographer Victor Moreno shared his photos. Click on photo to enlarge

Photo by Michelle Chance

From Maricopa High School


Attn: Parents of Maricopa High School Students

Maricopa High School is gearing up for the 2018-2019 school year. We will be starting our modified calendar school year making our summer shorter and preparing for student arrival.

Avoid the RUSH and take advantage of registering your “new” student(s) during the week of July 2. Our registrar’s office will be available to help you with that last minute registration(s). The registrars will be available Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 7:00am – 2:00pm, and Friday from 7:00am – 11:00am. (Closed Wednesday, July 4, 2018).

As we do every year, we have a week of “Student Check-In”. This is the time parents and students use to pick-up schedules (already enrolled students), speak with a counselor regarding any issue with their schedule; update health records with our site nurse; get their new ID that is a requirement for students to be on campus and also pay fees that may be associated with their schedules (Elective classes have fees). Please visit our Maricopa High School website at: http://mhs.maricopausd.org/ to see what day and time each grade level should plan to attend check-in.

Parents, please note that we are only set up for payment to accept cash or check. Unfortunately, we are not able to do debit/credit.

We hope that you’re enjoying your summer and we look forward to having our students back on campus, and ready to go July 23.

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A Maricopa woman captured video of wild horses on the Gila River Indian Reservation Tuesday morning. The footage was filmed by Steafy Montecino on Sacate Road in Casa Blanca around 8 a.m. Vehicles are seen stopping for the animals as a few cross the road, while one horse is shown sloshing in the recent monsoon’s roadside puddles.

“It was beautiful,” Montecino said.

The area where the video was filmed is located less than three miles from the State Route 347 and Casa Blanca Road intersection.

ONYX Dance Company in rehearsal

For the second year, the ONYX Young Choreographers Showcase will take flight in the Maricopa Performing Arts Center.

IF YOU GO
What: ONYX Young Choreographers Showcase
When: June 30, 3 p.m.
Where: Performing Arts Center, 45012 W. Honeycutt Road
How much: $7
Info: Dance@DesertSunPerfomringArts.com, katherinesherrod@yahoo.com, 520-483-8915

Started last year as part of the Maricopa Arts Council’s arts expo, the event is a performance and a contest. Choreographers in their teens and early 20s have created dances developed by the ONYX Dance Company, resident troupe of Desert Sun Performing Arts.

The showcase will feature approximately 15 dances and will start at 3 p.m. June 30.

Following the slate of performances, audience members are asked to pick their favorites. People’s Choice prizes will be awarded to the top three. First place receives $300, second place $150 and third $50.

Award funds are underwritten by Maricopa Arts Council and Desert Sun Performing Arts.

The showcase is a long-term dream of DSPA’s founder and director, Ceylan Gentilella. Herself a talented choreographer, Gentilella knows first-hand the excitement of bringing a dance creator’s personal artistic vision to life in real-time presentation before the public – definitely an acid test for the work.

“ONYX dancers and choreographers have been working hard all season to bring an amazing show to the city of Maricopa,” said Katherine Sherrod, president and co-founder of ONYX Dance Company. “We cannot wait to see you there.”


This story appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

Joan Koczor

By Joan Koczor

Mesothelioma (me-zoe-thee-lee-O-muh) is a rare type of cancer of the mesothelium caused by exposure to asbestos. The mesothelium is a thin membrane that protects and lubricates different body cavities, such as the chest and abdominal cavities.

Men 60 years and older are often diagnosed several years after exposure. Women have contracted this disease from washing their husbands’ clothes, although the husband – exposed to asbestos – does not contract this disease.

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that resembles a rock in its natural form. The rock will split into fibers, which are resistant to heat, fire and chemicals. Considered a natural product, it was widely used in the United States until the late 1970s. Over 3,000 products containing asbestos were in general use until the late 1980s.

Asbestos materials have been used in every branch of the military until the late 1970s. As a result, 30 percent of veterans have been diagnosed with mesothelioma.

It takes 20 to 50 years to develop and occurs in the lining of the lungs, chest, abdomen and heart.

There are three types of mesothelioma:

  • Pleural: Cancer of the lungs which is the most common because most asbestos fibers are inhaled. Symptoms may include shortness of breath and chest pain.
  • Peritoneal: Cancer of the abdomen. It is caused by ingesting asbestos fibers. Symptoms may include weight loss and nausea.
  • Pericardial: Cancer surrounding the heart. This is the rarest form and is rarely diagnosed while the patient is still alive.

Mesothelioma is often mistaken for less serious conditions. If you have been exposed to asbestos and are experiencing symptoms attributed to this disease, consult your family doctor. They will perform the basic tests and X-rays. Based on the results, your doctor will refer you to a radiologist who will do extensive testing – X-ray, CAT scan, PET scan and CT scan. These tests are used in the diagnosis of this disease.

A surgical biopsy is done and sent to a pathologist for review. A pathologist will review fluid or tissue biopsy samples to determine cell type. If the results of these tests determine further treatment is required, a qualified specialist will be suggested. One who has a wide range of extensive experience with mesothelioma cases.

A pulmonologist specializes in lung disease and evaluates lung function. A gastroenterologist specializes in disease of the digestive system and tissues which occur in the abdominal region. A cardiologist specializes in heart defects and other heart disorders.

Only 20 U.S. doctors specialize in the treatment of this disease.

The Mesothelioma Organization offers a doctor-match program, saving time and expense to those seeking treatment. Patient advocates are also available to answer questions and provide information.

888-385-2024

MesotheliomaGuide.com

 

Joan Koczor is a senior advocate and a member of the Age-Friendly Maricopa Advisory Committee. The Mesothelioma Guide provided information for this article.


This column appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

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Sponsored Content

Time goes by quickly when you’re having fun. But in our case, time has flown by when bringing babies into the world. In 2016, Banner Casa Grande embarked on an exciting journey – groundbreaking on a 26,000-square-foot Women & Infant Services unit that would enhance maternity care and services.

Soon after the groundbreaking, construction started and took about a year to complete. While there were some minor issues along the way, the brand new, $17 million unit opened on July 25, 2017. City officials were at the dedication, and the community showed up to celebrate and tour the new building. There was even extensive press coverage by media throughout the Phoenix area, showcasing the new building and what it meant to have these expanded services readily available for patients.

“It’s like we had this groundbreaking, blinked our eyes, and before you knew it, there was a new beautiful building on our campus,” said Rona Curphy, CEO of Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “We’ve really committed ourselves to upholding Banner Health’s mission of ‘Making health care easier, so life can be better’ for our patients and their loved ones. In the last year, this new unit has come to signify the importance of investing in our community. Whether it’s a new hospital unit, a new surgical robot, or new medical program, we’re not only saving lives through exceptional patient care, but also helping to boost our local economy. We’re proud we can play an instrumental part in that by helping our residents stay in Casa Grande for medical care, no longer needing to drive to Tucson or Phoenix for treatment.”

Banner Casa Grande continues to offer childbirth preparation courses so new parents can be ready for “labor day.” Also, through breastfeeding classes, mothers can learn about the benefits of breastfeeding their baby during their child’s first hours and days of life. While these patient care maternity services have been available before the new unit opened, the expanded unit has also allowed for enhanced services.

“A lot of exciting things have occurred since we opened the new unit,” said Janet Taylor, RN director of the Women & Infant Services unit. “For example, we offer laboring tubs for laboring mothers. This is an alternative method of relaxation and pain control so delivery can be easier for mothers. Also, having a new baby in the house on the first night, we want to help eliminate the worry of cooking at home. So we provide families a take-home celebration dinner for that first night with their baby.”

Taylor adds that in the new unit’s first 11 months of operation, from opening day on July 25, 2017, to mid-June 2018, there were 639 babies delivered there. Taylor said, “We project from July 25, 2017, to that same date this year, we will have had about 750 deliveries in the new unit.”

So now that the new unit is a year old, what better way to celebrate than by having a first birthday party! The public is invited to attend a free open house from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at the hospital, located at 1800 E. Florence Blvd. Tours of the unit will be given, light refreshments will be served, there will be a “meet and greet” with doctors and medical staff, and people will have a chance to win door prizes.

Curphy said, “This birthday party is not only to celebrate the first year the unit has been open, but also to say ‘thank you’ to the community. The community has been the driving force of all that we do here, and we appreciate the support they have given us over the years.”

For more information about maternity services at Banner Casa Grande Medical Center, please visit www.BannerHealth.com/casagrande.

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Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

Maricopa’s triple-digit temperatures will gradually climb back into the danger zone later this week, according to the National Weather Service.

Today will be sunny with a high just around 100 degrees F. Skies will remain clear over night with a low around 69.

Tuesday, expect more clear skies and a high of 103 during the day and an overnight low of 71.

Wednesday the high will be near 107, the zone of a heat watch, while the sky remains sunny. The nighttime low will be around 74.

Thursday is forecast to shoot back into excessive-heat-warning territory with a high of 110 under sunny skies. The overnight low is expected to be around 75.

Friday expects more of the same, with sunny skies and high near 112. Breezes are forecast to begin a pickup to 5-15 mph. The nighttime low may be around 75.

That leads into a weekend that, from this distance, is forecast to be hot and breezy, with gusting winds doing little to cool things off.

Summer-fun activities this week include an event at the Aquatic Center, juggling and dinosaurs at the Library and a Vacation Bible School. Below, Steve Miller of Maricopa Amateur Radio Association explains an upcoming emergency drill. For details on these and other events, or to add your own, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

James Reid, Juggler Extraordinaire, performs at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Age-Friendly Maricopa Advisory Committee meets at 4 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

After the Fire presentation by MFMD is at 7 p.m. at 43267 W. Maricopa Ave.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Healthy Living with Chronic Pain Workshop is at 9:30 a.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

City Council Work Session is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

City Council Regular Session & Special Meeting are at 7 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood is at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 7 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Teens Paint at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY

Vacation Bible School starts at 9:30 a.m. daily at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

World’s Largest Swim Lesson is at 10 a.m. at Coper Sky Aquatic Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Dinosaur Encounter is at 3 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Zonta Club of Maricopa meets at 5:30 p.m. at Honeycutt Coffee, 44400 W. Honeycutt Road, Suite 109.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY

Emergency Communication Drill starts at 11 a.m. and continues into Sunday afternoon at Copper Sky Police Substation, 17985 N. Greythorne Drive.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Henry Wade

By Henry Wade

As we get closer to the Aug. 28 primary election, it is becoming abundantly clear that this will be one of Maricopa’s most important elections. The current council has wrestled with some critical issues during the last four years, and changing the lion’s share of the team in the middle of the game would not bode well for actions already underway.

Mayor Price makes it a habit of recognizing and stating that building relationships is the key to progress whether it be economic or social. Well, nothing could be more significant in the current election cycle. The relationships established by the existing council must not be discounted in an effort to make self-interest points of view seem more relevant.

Issues such as the North Santa Cruz Wash flood zone area, State Route 347 improvements and capturing new economic development opportunities, such as a Cooper Sky commercial center, did not come to pass last week and inasmuch as we would want them to, will not be completed next week.

I recognize and submit that there are some very talented and dedicated community members willing to take on the challenge of serving Maricopa with honorable intentions.  However, what Maricopa needs right now is stability and stick-to-it-ness. Even if change is a natural part of life, it must be tempered with reality and honest, open-mindedness, especially when the change could influence your future in negative ways.

Therefore, Maricopa, study the tealeaves, connect with your horoscope or discuss it amongst yourselves but whatever you do, what is most important right now is that we all do our homework. Because, this could be one of the most important elections Maricopa has had in our 15 years of being a city.

Henry Wade is a Maricopa City Councilmember and a candidate for re-election.

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Leon Potter

Dear Editor:

I want to reintroduce myself to the voters of the City of Maricopa. My name is Leon Potter. I am a write-in candidate for city council member.  I moved to Maricopa with my wife and three children in April 2005. Soon after, I volunteered as a youth soccer coach in the Maricopa Parks and Recreation soccer program.

In 2010, I threw my hat into the ring as a mayoral candidate. While it wasn’t a successful bid, I learned a valuable lesson.  I needed to understand more about our City and its residents by being more involved.

After the 2010 elections, I was appointed to the Parks, Recreation, Library Advisory Committee. I volunteered and joined local non-profits. Incidentally; I also started my own, home-based business. I still operate my business today.

In 2012, I tried my hand in local politics, again. This time I was elected as a city council member. Since I left office in 2014, I have continued to be active in our community. In 2017, I was appointed to the Planning and Zoning Commission, elected to my HOA board, elected as a board member to the American Legion Post 133, and I volunteered on the Maricopa Veteran’s Day Parade committee.

Since my first political campaign in 2010, I have never used campaign signs. In fact, I’ve never accepted campaign contributions. Instead, since 2012, I’ve encouraged (potential) campaign donors to give to their favorite local charities. Thank you for considering me as a Maricopa City Council member.

Respectfully,

Leon Potter

 

Today is Flag Day. Founded to commemorate the adoption of the U.S. Flag June 14, 1777, Flag Day received its first presidential proclamation in 1916 and was established by Congress in 1946.

Here are instructions for proper display of the flag: https://www.va.gov/opa/publications/celebrate/flagdisplay.pdf

Here are instructions on proper disposal of a U.S. flag, from the Veterans of Foreign Wars:

1. The flag should be folded in its customary manner. 

2. It is important that the fire be fairly large and of sufficient intensity to ensure complete burning of the flag.

3. Place the flag on the fire.

4. The individual(s) can come to attention, salute the flag, recite the Pledge of Allegiance and have a brief period of silent reflection.

5. After the flag is completely consumed, the fire should then be safely extinguished and the ashes buried.

6. Please make sure you are conforming to local/state fire codes or ordinances.

Note: Please contact the local VFW Post if you’d like assistance or more information on proper flag disposal

Chris Troupe

Chris Troupe owns All Pro Window Film and has lived in Maricopa for almost five years.

Hometown: Concord, Massachusetts
Resides in: Alterra
Maricopan since: 2013
Occupation: Solar Film Installer
Family: Married with 2 sons (6 and 21) and 2 daughters (11 and 25) and one adorable lil grandson
Pets: Gage, rescue furbaby, he’s lab and Great Dane mix basically an oversized toddler
Cars: Dodge Journey, 86 Monte Carlo
Hobbies: Bowling, singing karaoke, and spending quality time with my children and grandson
Pet peeve: The 347
Dream vacation: Sight-seeing in Italy
Like most about Maricopa: Close community with amazing support for each other
Like least about Maricopa: Traffic to get out of Maricopa

Favorite …

Charity: Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Book: Anything about history
Movie: Red Dawn
Actor: Denzel Washington
Song: For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Metallica
Musician: Metallica
Team: Patriots
Athlete: Tom Brady
Food: Mexican
Drink: Coca-Cola
Meal: Fajitas
Restaurant: Valle Luna
Getaway: The beach
Quote: Say what you mean, mean what you say
Words to live by: Treat people the way you want to be treated
Anything else we should know? We are a family-based business with the best intentions for our community at heart. We are committed to quality service with affordable prices.


Meet other Maricopa neighbors and introduce yourself at http://www.inmaricopa.com/getting-to-know/

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Brian Petersheim

The local and national real estate markets are constantly changing. Whenever I am out and about wearing my HomeSmart Success shirt at Gyro Grill or Fry’s, someone usually asks those six words “How’s the real estate market doing?”

If you are looking to buy or rent, then it can be hard to get the right house and the right deal by viewing houses part-time. The highly sought after upgraded, unique or pool homes may only last on the market for a few days.

Currently in Maricopa, we only have 2.1 months of supply compared to the 2.9 months of supply this month in 2016. Fewer homes are on the market, and those with distinctive floor plans and curb appeal will attract many of the same buyers.

Average days on the market for a Maricopa home is 82 days, with homes under $200,000 selling fastest averaging 56 days. TIP: Ask your local Real Estate agent to reach out to their colleagues about any upcoming listings and ask for a sneak peek if allowed.

If you are thinking of selling, then the market is currently in your favor. Consider doing an interior painting, carpet cleaning and decluttering for your showings. While the median price in Maricopa is $235,000, prices have increased 9.5 percent from Jun 2017 to June 2018. Opposite of the prices, actual supply of active homes listed is down 12.2 percent from June 2017 to June 2018. TIP: Tell your agent you want the home to hit the Multiple Listing Service on a Thursday to get the most traffic in the first few days because of the weekend.

Also, have the professional pictures done a couple of days in advance. They should be included when the listing initially goes live.
These are the numbers for the city of Maricopa for the week of June 12. These numbers only focus on the homes in HOA’ed subdivisions.

• 297 homes currently available for sale, not under contract, looking for offers
• 257 homes currently under contract (should close escrow within 45 days pending inspection, appraisal)
• 37 of the available homes have a built-in, private pool, which is huge when a buyer must have a pool and they are only seeing 12 percent of the homes available
• $164,500 = Least expensive home available. Notes: 3 bed/2bath plus den, 1,302 square feet in Tortosa, with covered patio and vaulted ceilings.
• $419,000 = Most expensive home available (non-Province) Notes: 4bed/3bath, 3,023 square feet, single story in Glennwilde on quarter-acre with heated pool, water fall, new owned solar, granite and two new air conditioners.
• 296 Regular/non-distressed listings
• 0 Short sale/pre-foreclosure
• 1 Foreclosed/Bank owned

Number of bedrooms- 297 available homes
• 2 bed-29 (mostly Province)
• 3 bed- 91
• 4 bed- 127
• 5 bed- 42
• 6 bed- 7
• 7+ bed- 1

Garage parking: of the 297
• 2 car- 208
• 3 car- 86
• 4 car- 3

Price ranges:
• $150,001-175,000—– 5
• $175,001-200,000—- 50
• $200,001-225,000—- 53
• $225,001-250,000—- 80
• $251,001-275,000—– 40
• $275,001-300,000—- 28
• $300,001-350,000—-26
• $350,001-400,000—-10
• $400,001-450,000—–3
• $450,001+ ————–2

Bottom line: The market is strong, and homes that are priced competitively are selling. Get out there and meet your new neighbor. Any questions about value or the market, please reach out to me.

Brian Petersheim is a Maricopa Realtor with HomeSmart Success. He can be contacted at 602-206-9644 or BrianPetersheim@gmail.com.

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Did you know Maricopa Elementary School briefly carried a different name? In 1953, just before the beginning of the school year, the red brick schoolhouse (built by community members in 1914) was destroyed by fire. According to local historian Patricia Brock, Elton K. Porter died of a heart attack while fighting the fire. Porter farmed cotton in Maricopa and was a member of the school board. When the elementary school was rebuilt on the corner of Honeycutt Avenue and Maricopa Road (now John Wayne Parkway), it was named Elton K. Porter Grade School. Though the name reverted to Maricopa Elementary School in the 1960s, Porter was also remembered with the naming of an important north-south thoroughfare.

Photo courtesy MUSD/Maricopa Historical Society


This item appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

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Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

The most expensive home sold in Maricopa April 16 through May 15 was a lakeside house in Province that went for $375,000. That is a 2.8 percent increase in value since the last time the house was on the market in 2016 and just under $9,000 below the asking price. With a spacious floor plan and two master suites, the house included a back patio overlooking the water.

  1. 42419 W. Blue Suede Shoes Lane

Sold: May 15
Purchase price: $375,000
Square footage: 2,352
Price per square foot: $159.43
Days on market: 102
Builder: Engle
Year built: 2005
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 2.5
Community: Province
Features: Large kitchen, slate tile, great views, beautiful entrance courtyard and back patio, water softener, surround sound
Listing agent: Kim Gillespie, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage
Selling agent: Danielle M. Nichols, The Maricopa Real Estate Company

  1. 42403 W. Jailhouse Rock Court, Province, $362,500
  2. 20204 N. Snowflake Drive, Province, $362,000
  3. 44558 W. Venture Lane, Cobblestone Farms, $359,000
  4. 22076 N. Balboa Drive, Rancho El Dorado, $358,500

    This item appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

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Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

The least expensive home sold in Maricopa April 16 through May 15 was a 20-year-old mobile home on a large lot in the Heritage District. It sold for $79,500. The property was last on the market in 2005, when it was priced at $120,000. This time, it sold in a little more than a month for its asking price.

  1. 19992 N. Condrey Ave., Maricopa Manor, $79,500

Sold: April 21
Purchase price: $79,500
Square footage: 1,216
Price per square foot: $65.37
Days on market: 36
Builder: Unknown
Year built: 1998
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 2
Community: Maricopa Manor
Features: Remodeled with new cabinets and counter tops, new fixtures, new paint, four parking spaces
Listing agent: Daniel Tate, Presidential Realty
Selling agent: Mark A. Roberts, HomeSmart Success

  1. 44980 W. Fred Cole Lane, Estrella Park, $132,000
  2. 36900 W. Mondragone Lane, Sorrento, $145,000
  3. 18600 N. Lariat Road, Glennwilde, $148,000
  4. 19285 N. Ibiza Lane, Tortosa, $151,000

    This item appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

Hairy desert scorpion

By Scott Oliver

Scott Oliver

“Grandpa, there’s a baby lobster in your garden!”

I have lived in Maricopa for nearly six years now, and I had never encountered a scorpion in my home until last Sunday. I was up that morning before daylight. My son and his family were coming that afternoon for barbecue, and I needed to get a pork shoulder in the smoker.

Still not quite awake, my eyes still adjusting to my surroundings, I went into the laundry room and, there she was, a 2-inch bark scorpion on the wall, eye level, above the dryer. I am happy to report there was no “scorpion dance.” I don’t have major phobias when it comes to bugs and spiders, but a scorpion?

The three most commonly observed scorpions in Arizona are:

  • Desert or giant hairy scorpion (hadrurus arizonensis)
  • Striped or devil scorpion (vaejovis spinigerus)
  • Bark scorpion (centruroides sculpturatus)

Scorpions are one of the oldest animals on Earth. Their evolutionary history goes back to the Silurian era 430 million years ago. They evolved from giant scorpion-like creatures that emerged from the sea. Although they resemble crustaceans like lobsters and crayfish, scorpions actually are more closely related to ticks, mites and spiders.

Keeping scorpions out of your house begins in your yard. If you spot more than one, definitely call an exterminator. I would personally recommend calling only companies that specialize in scorpion control. Scorpions are extremely resilient and don’t respond to pesticides the way other bugs do.

After an initial treatment you can go the DIY route. There are plenty of successful, easily researched strategies available. Do remove dead branches, wood and mulch piles, debris under plants and bushes.

I calmly considered my options, kill or capture. There was a flyswatter within arm’s reach but that’s like taking a spoon to a knife fight. I slowly backed away, went into the garage and picked my 5-pound sledge hammer and returned armed and ready. Positioning myself to the side of the dryer I took a wide stance and dug in. Imagine a baseball player at home plate going through his routine. I just wanted to make solid contact. Slowly, I drew my hammer back, eyes on the target; I’m going to do this.

Scorpions are usually not aggressive unless threatened, and then look out. This trait makes killing or capturing them challenging. They move quickly when they feel threatened, or may do just the opposite and play dead. Apparently, size does matter. Surprisingly, the small, young bark scorpions are the most dangerous.

If you are stung by one, it will hurt like hell, but as with bees, it’s not life-threatening unless you suspect you are allergic or if you are infirm, in which case you should capture or kill the one that stung you and take it with you to a medical facility so the correct anti-venom can be used.

I did not smash my laundry room scorpion, saving myself a drywall repair project. Instead, I captured it in a mason jar for a show-and-tell with the grandkids that afternoon. It turned into a great teaching opportunity. Later that evening I took it to a vacant field a few blocks away and set her free. The next one might not be so lucky.


This column appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

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Dayv Morgan

By Dayv Morgan

The heat is rising for renters who are navigating fewer options among ever-increasing prices in the city this year.

Investors are selling their rental properties to cash out on their equity. Canadian landlords are also benefiting from the local market by getting about an extra 25 percent return, thanks to the currency exchange rate.

These factors have helped create the decreased supply Maricopa has seen in recent years.

Through mid-May, only 23 listings were available to renters. All but one had been on the market less than 30 days.

Last year at this time, some homes were renting for $900. Today, no listings go for less than $1,100; and only three homes were available for less than $1,200 per month.

In a competitive market, landlords often get more than one application and can be more restrictive on their terms, like not allowing pets.

Tenants with less-than-perfect credit can increase their chances of getting approved by including with their application a referral from current and previous landlords. They could also offer to pay a higher security deposit – which, by state law, cannot exceed 1.5 times the monthly rent amount.

Buyers should be wary of advertised rentals on Craigslist or other classified websites that seem too good to be true.

In most cases, there is no cost for using a Realtor, and they can help make sure the home is not in foreclosure and that a legitimate lease is signed.

As rent prices go up, renters may want to consider buying, because payments will be about the same.  A $160,000 home can be owned for less than $1,200 per month.

Here is an estimated monthly payment breakdown at 4.75 percent interest for a Federal Housing Association Loan:

$819      Principal Interest
$108      Mortgage insurance
$125      Property taxes
$75        HOA
$60        Home insurance
$1,187

There are several mortgage companies in Maricopa that a potential buyer can sit down with for a free no-obligation credit evaluation.

Dayv Morgan is a Maricopa Realtor and owner of HomeSmart Success.
844-811-7653
DayvMorgan@gmail.com


This column appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

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Sheriolyn Curry

 

By Rev. Sheriolyn Curry, CSA

There is a renewed interest over the use of comfort care as a planned, managed care option for persons afflicted with chronic illness, are terminally ill or are frail.

Here, the term terminal refers to a progressive disease that is incurable and irreversible; that is, it no longer responds to treatment and death is usually the expected result within a short period of time.

Choosing to receive “comfort care” does not mean you are giving up, you have decided to die or you will receive no medical care. Comfort care might not be as aggressive as other life-prolonging measures, but it is medical care.

With the advances in modern technology, there are very aggressive measures available that can be used to treat many illnesses. However, when faced with a terminal illness, people are choosing quality of life over quantity of days.

Comfort care really is about choices. When one is faced with a decision about long-term care for a chronic illness, the focus often turns to comfort measures for symptom control – managing pain, eliminating nausea or anxiety, etc. It can also include choices as to where and how often one wants to receive care. Many are opting for the comforts of home. Other choose the loving environment of a hospice facility.

Barbara Bush recently brought to light the discussion over comfort care when she publicly announced that as her treatment of choice before her passing in April. When people get to choose how they want to manage their care, they are more empowered in the process. Research suggests that on some level, they ultimately feel better about making the decision. They become partners in their own life’s journey.

There are opinions that associate choosing comfort care with giving up, and it is not, not at all. Comfort care still looks forward, it just no longer seeks a cure or a reversal of the condition. Done well, comfort care is a planned care option in which the patient, family members and care team discuss and agree on the course of action. It can be spiritually honoring for the care recipient, and provide peace of mind for the family. And there is no right or wrong way to feel about considering comfort care as your choice.

I pray this column brings peace to your soul. If you need us, call us at 480-659-9201. We are Comfort Keepers.

Sheriolyn Curry, CSA, is the owner of Comfort Keepers of Maricopa.


This column appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

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Aaron Gilbert. Photo by William Lange

By Aaron Gilbert

When we work out intensely, we damage tissues at the microlevel, and we use fuel.

This is what ultimately makes us stronger, leaner, fitter and more muscular, but in the short term it requires repair.

Repair and rebuilding occurs through the breakdown of old, damaged proteins (aka protein breakdown) and the construction of new ones (aka protein synthesis) — a process known collectively as protein turnover.

Muscle protein synthesis is increased slightly (or unchanged) after resistance workouts, while protein breakdown increases dramatically. We’re doing a lot more breaking-down than building-up.

The relationship between these two parameters (rate of muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein breakdown) represents the metabolic basis for muscle growth.

What to eat

Post-workout nutrition requires two things:

  1. Protein to aid in protein synthesis
  2. Carbohydrates to help replace muscle glycogen (and to enhance the role of insulin in transporting nutrients into cells)

You could certainly eat a whole food meal that meets these requirements after exercise. However, whole food meals aren’t always practical.

Some people aren’t hungry immediately after exercise. Whole food digests slowly, and we want nutrients to be available quickly. A whole-food meal that requires refrigeration might be less practical.

On the other hand, consuming a liquid form of nutrition that contains rapidly digesting carbohydrates (e.g. maltodextrin, dextrose, glucose) and proteins (e.g. protein hydrolysates or isolates)

  • might accelerate recovery by utilizing insulin for nutrient transport into cells;
  • can result in rapid digestion and absorption; and
  • is often better tolerated during and after workouts.

Data indicate that it may only take about 20 grams of protein after a workout to maximally stimulate muscle protein synthesis.

Once your workout is complete, have a whole food meal within an hour or two.

If priority No. 1 is to lose body fat, use only BCAAs as a workout drink, and five to 15 grams per hour of training. (If you weigh 200-plus pounds consume closer to 15 grams; less than 200 pounds, closer to five grams). If you’re leaner but still want to lose fat, choose a smaller dose (like 1/2 dose) of the protein plus carb combination, or opt for BCAAs.

 

Aaron Gilbert, CSCS, owns Longevity Athletics.
520-261-4661
Aaron@LongevityAthletics.com


This column appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

 

Photo by Michelle Chance

 

A home in Tortosa caught fire Tuesday afternoon and threatened neighboring houses.

Maricopa Fire/Medical Department responded to Cartegna Lane after neighbors reported smoke. One neighbor tested the door handle of the building and discovered it was hot.

The homeowner was not home at the time. Three dogs were in the back yard, apparently having escaped through a dog door. No injuries have been reported.

Deidra Campbell, a neighbor, said she saw the smoke on her way home and was one of the first to report the fire. At first, she thought it was blowing dust and later a small brush fire.

“When we got closer to the entry to Tortosa, we could tell it was different,” she said. “We waited in the median and called from there.”

MFMD hit two houses with water in the 35000 block of West Cartegna.

Fire Chief Brady Leffler said by the time firefighters arrived, the fire had burned through the stairwell, cutting off access to the second floor.

“They backed out; they went defensive, which is to protect exposures and things like that,” Leffler said. “They’ve got it under control now.”

He said the fire was contained to one house.

Maricopa Police Department spokesman Daniel Rauch said officers were able to contact the homeowner, and he was on his way to the scene.

It is the third house fire reported since June 6.

Photo by Michelle Chance

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The Maricopa Militia. Photo by Victor Moreno

A youth tackle football program is recruiting players age 6-9 for a fall season.

IF YOU GO
What: Militia Speed & Conditioning Clinic
When: June 30, 8-10 a.m.
Where: Copper Sky
How much: Free

The Maricopa Militia is part of the nonprofit National Youth Sports football league. Team manager Joanne Taylor said the team was formed after the disappointment of false starts by other teams that have come and gone.

“Some of our players and coaches have been playing tackle football here in Maricopa for the past four to five years and have had to endure many empty promises, failed leadership, belittlement and discrimination,” Taylor said.

The Militia was conceived as a way to change all that.

The Militia’s home games are played on the Maricopa High School field. Head coach for 7-under and 8-under teams is Josh Taylor, assisted by Dave Taylor, Jay Owens, Ruben Adame and Louie Placencio. If the 9-under team comes to be, another coach will be added. Matt Rivett handles the finances, and team mom is Tara Owens.

“We understand that not every young athlete that plays for us will play high school or college football,” Taylor said. “However, every one of our young athletes will grow up to be a member of a community. This is why we focus on building life skills through football.”

The Militia will host a speed and conditioning clinic on June 30 at Copper Sky Regional Park from 8 to 10 a.m. This free clinic is for current and prospective players to display and build new skills.

The fall season starts July 30.

Militia coaches. Photo by Victor Moreno

Besides learning tackle football, the Militia players are urged to participate in community service.

“Our goal is to perform at least one act of service as a team per season. This past season we assisted the Maricopa Food Bank (located at Santa Cruz Elementary School),” Taylor said. “This was a great opportunity for us to support and give back to our community. While at the Food Bank, our players were able to sort and prepare new and donated plastic bags to be filled with vital canned goods and grocery items for the families in need in our community.” See photos below.

Taylor said community service helps the players feel good about themselves through helping others. It also engages them in the community and creates bonds outside the football field.

“That event had a profound impact on our team, because they saw how volunteering can change our lives and the lives of others,” the team manager said. “It also provides a sense of purpose and teaches life lessons.”

The Militia play teams from all over the Valley. The team motto is “Honor, Strength and Courage.”

“We hope to start with that creed and build the confidence, responsibility, respect, discipline, service and team work in each player through our program,” the coach said. “It all starts and ends with fun and helping the players understand and develop a love for the game of football.”

Organizers chose the name Militia to echo the military comparisons intrinsic to football.

“Another reason we selected Militia is that we also really wanted to reflect our patriotism for this great country we live in,” Taylor said. “We have adopted an Americana theme with stars and stripes on our uniforms. With the name Maricopa Militia, we would like to draw from the meaning that helped in the creation of America during the Revolutionary War. We also pay tribute to the men and women who serve our country today.”

Being part of NYS allows the team to keep its costs down and keep the program affordable. Taylor said the team also benefits from “generous donations” from Maricopa businesses like Water and Ice and Native Grill & Wings. This year’s goal is to play in the NYS National Tackle Championship tournament in San Diego.

https://www.facebook.com/MaricopaMilitiaAZ/

Rich Vitiello. (Submitted photo)

By Rich Vitiello

Hello, Maricopa. I’m Rich Vitiello and in the running to be your next city council member. You may have seen me standing on the side of the 347 in the morning rush waving you a good day. It’s important that people get to see the face behind the name.

My wife and I have made Maricopa our home since moving here almost 13 years ago from back east. We’ve raised four daughters and have eight grandchildren, four of whom attend our local schools. We love this city.

I’m running for city council because I love this city and the people in this community. Maricopa continues to experience growth and with growth opportunities arise. I contribute to maintain the quality of values that this city instills by volunteering with the police, food bank and women’s shelter, as well as having coached the girls’ JV softball team in 2014-2015 school year. I also organized several fund raisers for Maricopa residents in hardship.

I sat on the city’s Board of Adjustments, appointed by council member Henry Wade. I’ve met and gotten to know all our city council members and the mayor. With 27 years of international business experience, I learned the key to solving issues is to listen to people. The same also applies in government.

That’s why you’ll see me standing on the 347 waving you a good morning. I want you to get to know me. Please say “Hi” when you see me in the grocery store or somewhere here in town, or feel free to call me on my cell phone at 480-358-8051 any time.

I’ve gotten to know many Maricopa residents by being open, honest and listening and learning. Ask questions. Get to know me. Your needs are important. My desire to be on the city council is to give a voice to your concerns.

I’ve worked hard for my family. Let me work hard for you. Let me be your voice on city council.

Rich Vitiello is a Maricopa resident.

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The Advanced Performance motorcycle repair shop is moving into one of the last spaces remaining at Santa Cruz Commerce Center off Murphy Road and Maricopa-Casa Grande Highway. Submitted photo

The Ak-Chin Industrial Park Board announced that Advanced Performance LLC has leased Suite B in the Mesquite Building at 12501 N. Murphy Road in Ak-Chin’s industrial park, Santa Cruz Commerce Center.

Advanced Performance offers custom performance engine building and motorcycle repair. Co-owners Steve Trivisonno and Jeff Hamilton started their business in 2014, after training and teaching together at Motorcycle Mechanics Institute (MMI) in Phoenix.

“We started working on little projects for some weekend cash and found that we really liked working together,” Trivisonno said.

Both Trivisonno and Hamilton are certified motorcycle mechanics with high-level certifications. This makes them qualified to build and service such leading brands as Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, Harley Davidson, Victory, Polaris Sea Doo, Can Am and BMW.

As projects steadily grew, the business owners turned their part-time hobby into a full-time business about a year and a half ago.

“We offer more than just basic motorcycle repair services,” Trivisonno said. “Rather, we provide the expertise necessary to get the best performance out of your street bike, dirt bike, ATV, side by side or watercraft.”

According to Trivissono, a lot of current business is already coming from Maricopa and they have some government contracts, including maintaining the ATV fleet for the Department of Homeland Security, Ajo Station. In addition, they have loyal customers from Tempe, Chandler and Gilbert who are willing to make the drive for their expertise.

After outgrowing two garage spaces and storage units, the co-owners decided to find a brick-and-mortar location for their business. That’s when they found the Mesquite Building to have the right combination of price and location.

“We do good quality work at an affordable price, said Trivisonno, “and we think our new location may help us attract more business from Casa Grande.”

Currently, the business operates by appointment at 520-252-3566, apcycle.com or Facebook.

 

Photo by Mason Callejas

Maricopa Ace Hardware recently honored the late Joe Stanton, a long-time employee who passed away April 15.

During May, the store used its Round Up campaign in Stanton’s name, donating extra coinage rounded up from receipts. Stanton’s wife Anna Jo and family presented the resulting $4,700 to Maricopa Fire/Medical Department, which had responded to Stanton’s health emergency.

A New York native and Navy veteran, Joe Stanton was 58 years old.

From left to right; (back row) Jaime Westmiller (son-in-law), Jessica Westmiller (daughter), Capt. Red Rogers (MFMD), Justin Hensel (MFMD), Anna Jo Paolangeli-Stanton (wife), Osheah Davis (president IFFA Local), Mike Richey (Maricopa Ace Hardware owner),  Michael Perkins (MFMD),  Kenny Buchanan (MFMD); (front row, grandchildren) Dante, Rowen, Chloe and Brynn Westmiller.

Photo by Mason Callejas

A didgeridoo demo, presentations on caretaking and chronic pain, and a Movies Under the Stars from the Copper Sky pool are among this week’s activities in Maricopa. For details on these and other events, or to add your own, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Didgeridoo Down Under is a special event at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Healthy Living with Chronic Pain Workshop is at 9:30 a.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Caregiving Presentation is at 2 p.m. at Copper Sky Police Substation, 17985 N. Greythorne Drive.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Movie Chat for teens is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Veterans Affairs Advisory Committee meets at 6 p.m. in the Montezuma Conference Room at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

MUSD Governing Board meets at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Unified School District, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Dr. T-Rex Science is a special event at 3 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Rooms, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

8-Bits is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Movies in the Pool starts at 7 p.m. at Copper Sky Regional Park, 44345 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Maricopa Amateur Radio Association will be holding an annual emergency preparedness drill known as Field Day from June 23 at 11 a.m. to June 24 at 2 p.m.

The objective of this drill, with participants across North America, will be to make as many radio contacts as possible in a 24-hour period using equipment that is either solar or battery-powered.  Running “off the grid” simulates the loss of the power grid and tests radio amateur’s abilities to get emergency radio traffic passed in spite of the absence of commercial electrical power.  These field day events have been held across the country since 1933.

The local drill will be at the Maricopa Police Department substation at Copper Sky.  Portable antennas and radios will be deployed.  Anyone interested in amateur radio or emergency communications is welcome to stop by.  Interested parties may even operate the radio equipment under the supervision of licensed operators.

Amateur radio, often called “ham radio,” has been around for a more than a century.  In that time, it’s grown into a worldwide community of licensed radio operators using the airwaves with every conceivable means of communications technology. It includes people of all ages and walks of life. Most U.S. astronauts have an amateur radio license.  Hams are just people who enjoy learning and being able to communicate around the world. Hams not only can build and modify their radio equipment but are responsible for inventing some of the modern electronic conveniences we use today

To obtain a license, radio amateurs must pass a series of tests on radio electronics, communications protocol, and operating practices, and answer questions on Part 97 of the FCC rules and regulations.  All ham radio activities are on a volunteer basis.

Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

While its neighbors work on getting store-ready, Dunkin’ Donuts opened in the Edison Pointe shopping plaza Friday morning with great fanfare.

Owner Alex Apodaca, who owns several stores, said he and his partners usually do not go “all out” for an opening in larger cities because the interest isn’t as keen as it is in a smaller suburb like Maricopa.

This time, “all out” meant band members from Maricopa High School, a radio remote, kids games and more, with activities continuing Saturday with a pinstriping demonstration. The official ribbon-cutting including Mayor Christian Price, city council members, Chamber of Commerce members and candidates running for assorted offices. Some proceeds from the grand opening weekend benefit three nonprofits.

WingStop is meant to go in two doors down and still has a lot of work to do. A city stop-work order was posted on the door of the store space in between, which is to be a nail salon.

Meanwhile, work continues steadily nearby on the new Burger King, which is expected to open this summer. In the anchor space in the plaza’s main building, Ross still has a projected open date of July 21.

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Photo by Michelle Chance

Arizona Rick and the Bang Bang Balloon Company entertained a room full of children at Maricopa Public Library Thursday as part of the summer programming.