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inMaricopa

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Photo by Mason Callejas

By Julia Gusse

Julia Gusse (submitted photo)

With the passing of Sen. John McCain, many were reminded of his service to our country in both the military and the Senate.  Many of us appreciate the passion he had for assuring our service men and women did not go without.  He looked out for his brothers and sisters in uniform during his time in captivity until the days and weeks prior to his passing.  Regardless of how you felt about his politics, in my opinion, Sen. McCain was always watching out for us (active duty and military veterans).  There are organizations set up to “watch out” for veterans but getting this information to those in need doesn’t come easy.  


For the most part, our military veterans aren’t looking for a handout. As a matter of fact, the majority of our veterans don’t know about the services nor do they seek the services that are readily available to them. It is only when they are in desperate need that they start reaching out and even then, our typical vet will work the situation out and struggle before asking for help.  Asking for help does not come easy for our vets but what if our entire Maricopa community was aware of services and “watched out” for them, the same way they “watched out” for us/our country?


This year Maricopa will plan many informational events, including a veterans suicide prevention workshop, please stay informed.  Maricopa Veterans Organizations, led by the American Legion Auxiliary Unit 133, will also hold its second annual Maricopa Veterans Day Parade.  A perfect way to get involved and “watch out” for our vets is by participating. It is only an hour or two of your time with a lifetime of rewards to our veterans.  The parade will be held on Nov. 10.
 To participate or for more information, please email auxiliarypresident@alpost133az.org.

Julia Gusse is a member of the Maricopa City Council.

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The City of Maricopa marked Hispanic Heritage Month with a ceremony and proclamation, joined by mariachi from Eloy High School and Cuacualti Dance Group at City Hall Tuesday night. The event, presented by the Cultural Affairs Advisory Committee, kicked off a month of activities that include Grammy-winner Ramon Ayala in concert at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center on Saturday, a special Story Time at the library Sept. 27, Mexican Bingo (and chips and salsa) during Game Night at Copper Sky Sept. 28, “My Vida Robot” for Movies Under the Stars at UltraStar, a special event on the works of Frida Kahlo at the library Oct. 11, and Kids Bilingual Story Time and the library every Monday and Tuesday in October. See details on these events at InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

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MHS head coach Brandon Harris (right) had a physical confrontation with Central head coach Jon Clanton Sept. 14. Photo by Jeff Hazlett

From the desk of Maricopa High School Principal Brian Winter: This is the response from Coach Brandon Harris regarding the events that transpired at the conclusion of the homecoming football game on Friday, Sept. 14:

“Since being named head coach of our football program, I have been obsessive in my belief that our program should model behavior that is consistent with excellence, good character and high morals. This past Friday, some of my actions weren’t consistent with this. My direct supervisor (AD Jake Neill) instructed me to do certain things at the end of the altercation with Central’s coach, and I did not comply.

“After reflection, I realize that my actions are not consistent with what I have modeled for our coaches and players up to this point. I can’t in good conscience accept that this should be overlooked. I have suspended players this season and sat players – even just last week for conduct I felt was unbecoming. I am just a man, I am fallible, and I make mistakes. I made one last Friday.

“To not hold myself to the same standards I talk about wouldn’t be the right thing to do. I’m as competitive as they come, and I live for matchups like this Friday, because if you are a competitor you want to coach in big games against the best competition possible. So, this is as painful as it can be for me, but as much as it pains me, and the obvious jeopardy it will put our team in, some things are more important than wins and losses – I want to be remembered for how I lived my life.

“I am not going to coach in the Higley game this Friday because of the part I played in Friday night’s incident following the game. I am taking this opportunity to apologize to our Superintendent, Principal, Athletic Director, my colleagues in the greater good for teaching, along with my coaches, players and our city for my conduct. The last thing I want to do is represent us in a negative light.”

Photo by Angelica Ramis

The 11th annual Kids Day Maricopa, a free event presented by A1 Health & Wellness Clinic, took over Maricopa Wells Middle School Saturday. Kids entertained and were entertained. First responders brought their vehicles to be examined, including a helicopter, Wildman Phil brought reptiles and other critters, families tried a variety of crafts and enjoyed a petting zoo, special guests appeared, dancers, cheer squads and karate students demonstrated their skills, and there was much more. Click photo to enlarge.

Grammy winner Ramon Ayala will perform this weekend.

Entertainment, sports and important meetings are all part of the schedule of events in Maricopa this week. For details on these and other listings, or to add your own, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Age-Friendly Maricopa Advisory Committee meets at 4 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

City Council Work Session is at 6 p.m. at 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

MHS Volleyball hosts Williams Field at 6 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

City Council Regular Session is at 7 p.m. at 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa High School Cross Country meet is at 2 p.m. at Copper Sky Regional Park, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

MHS Volleyball hosts Centennial at 6 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Subdivision Ordinance Public Forum is at 3 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Zonta Club of Maricopa meets at 5:30 p.m. at Honeycutt Coffee, 44400 W. Honeycutt Road, Suite 109.

MHS Volleyball hosts Higley at 6 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SPA Volleyball hosts EVAC at 6 p.m. at Sequoia Pathway Academy, 19265 N. Porter Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

8-Bits video gaming is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

MHS Football hosts Higley at 7 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Greatest Hits Showcase by MHS Theatre Company is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Mother Daughter Day for DSPA is at 1 p.m. at Saddleback Elementary School, 18600 N. Porter Road.

Ramón Ayala in concert, gates open at 6 p.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Greatest Hits Showcase by MHS Theatre Company is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

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Sam Craig at age 20 (left), already a husband and father, and in his 70s (right). Submitted photos

Samuel Craig Jr., formerly of Maricopa, passed away Sept. 10, 2018, in Toltec. He was 88 years old.

Samuel Craig Jr. Submitted photo

The father of 13 children, Mr. Craig formerly was a property foreman in the Maricopa/Stanfield area and heavy-equipment operator for the City of Coolidge.

Mr. Craig, also known as Junior, was born Jan. 12, 1930, in Crockett, Texas, to Samuel Craig Sr. and Viola Atmore Craig.

He was raised in Crockett, Texas, and developed a love for horses and farming at an early age. He met the love of his life Lizzie Bell McCullough-Craig  at age 18 in 1948. They married in Crockett, Texas, and their first daughter Dorothy Ann was born in 1949. His father Samuel Craig Sr. and he shared the same vision to move west for a better life.

Once he and his father settled in the Maricopa/Stanfield area, they pioneered the newly developed land for the Sellers ranch via Louis Johnson’s estate  He also came into contact with the mega-superstar movie cowboy John Wayne, who would visit Johnson, his friend and partner. Samuel Craig Jr. became the foreman of over 2,000 acres of land from Maricopa to Coolidge. Mrs. Lizzie Bell McCullough-Craig, also worked at Louis Johnson’s estate.

His love for horses landed him a great position as the head rancher at Sellers ranch in Valley Farms. By 1960, he was raising seven children while he performed numerous duties, i.e. picking cotton, driving tractors and herding cattle.

Then he became involved in the rodeo circuit as one of the first African-American cowboys in Pinal county to compete as a team roper, and he rode his horse Chip Jr. in numerous rodeos  and parades.  He won some ribbons along the way.

Mr. Craig worked very hard farming for over 20 years. From the farm life he became a heavy equipment operator for the City of Coolidge for over 20 years at the Coolidge landfill. In his older age he managed to build  three houses  with only an elementary school education. He and  his dad were both carpenters who were self-taught, excellent in math and very detailed.

Submitted photo

In his late 80s, he finally slowed down a little, but he always loved to go to Church and sang solos. He loved to sing to the homeless people to uplift their spirits. He and wife Margie continued to take good care of each other until he was finally called to his heavenly home on Sept. 10 at 10:30 p.m. He will be in our hearts forever.

He is survived by his wife Margie Craig, his children the Rev. Dorothy Wellington, Donnie Craig, Paula Jean Rae, Dr. Alfred Earl Craig Sr., Julia Richardson, Samuel Earl Craig III, Diane Ruth Parker, Min. Debra Jean Garrett, Ronnie Craig, Frank Tapia, Manuel Dominguez, Sally Dominguez-Ruiz and Jaime Dominguez; siblings Eula Asher of Casa Grande, Freddy C. Craig of Phoenix, Maxine Davis of Las Vegas, Nevada, Hareld D. Craig Sr. of Tucson and Ophelia Frazier of Tucson; 50 grandchildren, 124 great-grandchildren and 12 great-great-grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents Samuel Craig Sr. and Viola Atmore Craig, his sisters Mildred Craig-Brice, Sammie Marie Craig-Graves, Clementine Craig-Robbins, Dorothy Butler and Ola Mae Craig-Scurlock and his brother Alfred Ray Craig Sr.

Funeral services are scheduled for Sept. 19 at Coolidge New Destiny Christian Center, 800 N. Ninth St., Coolidge. Viewing is at 10 a.m., and the service starts at 11 a.m. with Dr. Alfred E. Craig Sr. officiating.

(Submitted by Samuel Earl Craig III)

Submitted photo

Sponsored content

It’s been about a year since Banner Casa Grande Medical Center received its daVinci Xi Surgical System. This advanced piece of technology has served the community well in the months that it’s been used, with 433 robotic surgical procedures performed and documented at the hospital, from Sept. 19, 2017, to July 31, 2018.

“This surgical robot is more than just about having the best technology available,” said Rona Curphy, CEO of Banner Casa Grande Medical Center. “Our main goal is making sure our patients have the best possible surgical outcomes. We really have been pleased that we can provide such a great service to the people that live in our community.”

Since its inception, the daVinci Xi Surgical System has helped surgeons at Banner Casa Grande perform more than 400 hernia repairs, and nearly 150 colon resections. Other treatments that have been performed using this technology include spleen and bladder surgical procedures. Patients who have undergone some of these procedures have been able to take advantage of the benefits of the robot, including a shorter length of stay in the hospital, fewer complications, and less blood loss.

The da Vinci Xi system uses four robotic arms that provide surgeons with greater precision, control and access to areas that are otherwise hard to reach. Surgeons control the movements of the arms, performing complex surgeries with only a few small incisions. The robotic arms include mechanical wrists that bend and rotate in ways similar to the movements of a human wrist. To see if you qualify for a robotic surgical procedure using the daVinci Xi Surgical System, please consult with your primary care physician.

Banner Casa Grande Medical Center is a full-service, community hospital providing comprehensive quality care to the Casa Grande Valley as well as the surrounding communities of western Pinal County. The hospital offers a variety of medical specialties including: cardiology, gastroenterology, gynecology, neurology, oncology, pediatrics, psychiatry and urology. Banner Casa Grande is part of Banner Health, a nonprofit healthcare system with 28 acute-care hospitals in six states. For more information, visit www.BannerHealth.com/casagrande.

 

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Central Arizona College.

Central Arizona College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free webinar series by Paige Cahill of Get Your Business Online with Google.

Paige Cahill

This free online series will be held from 9 a.m. until 10 a.m. on the following dates.

  • Sept. 18: Reach More Customers Online with Google
  • Oct. 30: Get Found on Google Search and Map
  • Nov. 13: Grow Your Business with Email Marketing

Cahill, national digital marketing speaker, trainer and coach, guarantees attendees will walk away with Google tools, digital marketing best practices, and tips that will maximize marketing efforts, time, and results.

This opportunity is available to all community members and individuals can choose to register for one, two, or all three sessions. To attend, please email sbdc@centralaz.edu or call 520-494-6610.

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By Anthony Smith

Anthony Smith (submitted photo)

I endorse Mr. Glenn Morrison for constable for the Justice Court Precinct #4 in Pinal County. Last spring, after several meetings and checking with other elected officeholders, I determined that Glenn has the qualifications and character to perform the important role as your constable.

In preparing for the important job of Constable, Glenn has assembled an impressive list of experiences. Since 2011, Glenn has been a member of Pinal County’s Sheriff Patrol Posse, he is a successful businessman involved in his community and is a member of the Arizona Constables Association.

I truly believe Glenn Morrison will make an outstanding constable and hope you give him your vote too.


Anthony Smith is a resident of Maricopa and a Pinal County Supervisor.

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By Dayv Morgan

Dayv Morgan

Traditionally, a down payment on a home is 20 percent of the sales price. This allows a buyer to avoid paying a monthly fee for private mortgage insurance. But saving up 20 percent is often a struggle for potential homebuyers. The median sales price in Maricopa is around $210,000, which would require $42,000 down.

This is why down-payment assistance (DPA) programs remain in demand. In 2016, the Pathway to Purchase (P2P) program allowed Maricopans to receive a grant of 10 percent of the price, up to $20,000, to be used towards the down payment. The P2P program returned last month for selected zip codes, including most of Casa Grande, but unfortunately Maricopa was not on that list.

There are still other DPA options for homebuyers in Maricopa. And DPAs are not just for first-time homebuyers.

Administered by the Arizona Industrial Development Authority, the HOME Plus Home Loan Program provides a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage combined with DPA up to 5 percent. The assistance is provided in the form of a three-year, no interest, no down payment, second mortgage, completely forgiven at the end of three years. The DPA can be used toward the down payment, closing costs or a combination of the two. Active military and veterans can receive an additional 1 percent.

For those who do not qualify for these programs, there is still a standard 3.5-percent down FHA loan program, which is the most common in Maricopa. The 0-percent down USDA loan program also still exists, but is only for specific geographical areas, and not an option within the city limits of Maricopa.

A 620 credit score is often thought to be the minimum to qualify for financing. Many renters don’t begin to even think about looking for homes until their score is in the 600s. FHA actually sets a minimum score of 580, but mortgage companies often will add their own “overlays” on top of the federal guidelines, bringing it back up to a 620.

Fortunately, there are some lenders with niche programs available to help potential buyers with less-than-great credit.

Carrington Mortgage Services, for example, has options for VA and FHA loans with a credit score as low as 500. The FHA loan requires a higher down payment of 10 percent, but the VA product does not require any down payment at all.

The previously mentioned HOME Plus program has a 620 credit score with most lenders, but there are several companies that will accept scores under 620, including Flagstar, Carrington, Bank of America and Quicken Loans.

Every lender will likely have different requirements for qualifying. In addition to credit score and down payment, other factors such as debt-to-income ratios and cash reserves will come into play. Based on your personal situation, your real estate professional and lender can direct you to the best financing programs available.

 

Dayv Morgan is a Maricopa Realtor and owner of HomeSmart Success.
844-811-7653
DayvMorgan@gmail.com


This column appears in the September issue of InMaricopa.

By Henry Wade

Henry Wade

First of all I would like to take a moment to say thank you for re-electing me for a second term on the Maricopa City Council. I am excited and look forward to working with the new council.

I am sincerely humbled by your confidence and support and will continue to work hard to ensure our community has the best representation possible. Having said that, I would greatly appreciate your vote for Mr. Andre LaFond to become our next constable for the Maricopa-Stanfield Justice Court. Andre will bring a new and fresh approach to this critical position of trust and respect.

I have personally observed Andre’s calm yet firm demeanor which are much needed traits to successfully support the court and community at large.  And I am convinced that Andre will serve Maricopa-Stanfield with respect and honor.

After serving our country in the U.S. Army, Andre chose a career as a private law enforcement professional where he’s spent 14 years sharping his investigative and interrogation skills. This experience has provided him with the very important interpersonal skills needed to enforce court orders safely and effectively. Andre can do the job.

So, remember, voter registration ends 10/09/2018. Early Ballot Mail Date is 10/10/2018. Final date to mail back early ballots is 10/31/2018.

General Election Date is 11/06/2018 – Please vote for Andre – Constable.


Henry Wade is a recently re-elected member of Maricopa City Council.

Commemorations of Sept. 11 and Homecoming activities mark this week’s events in Maricopa. For details on the following events and others, or to add your own, go to InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Planning & Zoning Commission meets at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Circle Plaza.

MHS Staff v. Students Football Game is at 7 p.m. at Ram Stadium 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Sept. 11 Remembrance Ceremony is at 6:30 a.m. at Copper Sky Police Substation, 17985 N. Greythorne Drive.

Patriot Day Flag Raising is at a.m. at Maricopa Veterans Center, 44240 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Highway.

Patriot Day Flag Raising is at 8 a.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Patriot Day Ceremony is at 8 a.m. at Legacy Traditional School, 17760 N. Regent Drive.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood is at 9 a.m.at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Caregiver Support Group meets at 10 a.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Maricopa Small Business Education Series Kickoff is at 11 a.m. at Central Arizona College – Maricopa Campus, 17945 N. Regent Drive.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Freshman Football Game is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

MUSD Governing Board meets at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Unified School District Office, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Highway.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Ramfest is at 6 p.m. at Copper Sky Regional Park, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Homecoming Football Game is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Sequoia Pathway Football hosts South Point at 7 p.m. at Pacana Park, 19000 N Porter Road.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Copa Shorts Film Fest Free Filmmaking Workshops are at 9:30 a.m. at Central Arizona College – Maricopa Campus, 17945 Regent Drive.

Kids Day Maricopa is at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Wells Middle School, 45725 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

Desert Wind Middle School’s Blended Learning students weren’t just playing around. Since the start of school, they have been brainstorming, designing, marketing and analyzing the cost of an original toy. Thursday, they displayed their creations for a packed house at Toy Expo 2018, where family members and other visitors voted on their favorites.

 

MONDAY

Labor Day, government offices, banks and many other businesses closed.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

City Council Work Session is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

City Council Regular Session is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 N. Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

THURSDAY

Real Estate Roundtable is at 8 a.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time is t 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at Healing Rooms Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

8-Bits is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Pinal County NAACP State Conference is at 9 a.m. at the MPD Substation, 17985 N. Greythorne Drive.

Parent Support Group for special needs families meets at 4 p.m. at Desert Sun Performing Arts, 19756 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 107.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

By Rich Vitiello

Rich Vitiello (submitted photo)

Dear Maricopa:

Thank you. It will be an honor and privilege serving you, the residents of Maricopa, when I take the oath of office in December. I would like to thank you for your support not only during the campaign, but in the voting booth. Every vote counts and every vote is special. I pledge to be the best council representative I can be – for you and for all of Maricopa.

My family, friends and supporters know that I am a man of my word, and I am as committed to serving this city as I am in caring for our home. This is where we live, and this is where we are.

I am forever grateful for the unwavering encouragement and strength I have received from my wife, family and close friends. Without you, I could never have done it. You, especially, Joann, you are my rock.

Again, thank you, Maricopa.


Rich Vitiello was elected outright to the Maricopa City Council in Tuesday’s Primary Election and was the top vote-getter.

The ninth annual Copa Crew Hype Back to School basketball Tournament is Sept. 28-30 in the Sequoia Pathway Academy high school gym.

The competition is for high school girls and seventh grade (13U) boys from in-state and out-of-state teams.

“Coach Jesse and I have been working with our local businesses for the past eight years to bring you an event that will not only bring teams together from all over for a weekend of competitive basketball, but to also encourage all of our participants, families and followers to shop and dine locally while visiting our town,” said Dee Estrada.

Entry fee is $250 per team. Deadline to enter is Sept. 15.

There will be first, second and third place awards in each division, T-shirts, MVP and all-tourney awards, full concession and raffle prizes.

For more information, contact the Estradas 

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submitted photo

As Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino continues its multi-million-dollar expansion, it has opened The Spa.

The business within the complex offers massage, waxing and facial treatments and a full-service nail salon. Its grand opening was announced Tuesday.

“Our customers have told us over the years that one of the amenities that they would like to see on property is a full-service spa,” said Robert Livingston, general manager and regional president of Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino. “We are excited to bring this luxury experience not only to our guests but to local visitors as well.”

The spa features four treatment rooms including one couple’s suite.  Features include adjustable beds, complimentary LED Light Therapy in each treatment room, a dedicated Esthetics Room with back bar feature, and the Signature Hungarian Face Massage. The spa uses Eminence and Farmhouse Fresh treatments.

The Spa at Harrah’s Ak-Chin is open Monday–Saturday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.  Reservations are required at 480-802-3340.

Sponsored content

By Aaron Gilbert

Aaron Gilbert. Photo by William Lange

Create systems that make health and fitness faster and easier, such as:

  • Keep fresh, whole foods in plain sight.
  • Reduce or eliminate “treat” foods.
  • Establish a morning or weekend routine to chop veggies and prepare protein+complex carbs in bulk.
  • Sign up for a CSA box or healthy meal delivery.
  • Keep berries and greens in freezer (for quick Super Shakes).
  • Join a gym or personal training studio close to home or work.
  • Keep a packed gym bag in your car or by the front door.
  • Leave weights and resistance bands lying around for quick, convenient workout.
  • Hold gatherings and meetings at parks and gyms.

Put meal prep and movement in your calendar. If we waited until we “felt like it,” a lot of important things would get neglected. Schedule it in, and stick to it.

Review at the end of each week: Did I use my time to support my health and fitness?

Yes
Explore what worked and keep doing that.
Celebrate! You deserve it.
Add 15 more minutes of health food prep and movement next week.

No
What do you do instead?
If it was low-priority stuff, combine those activities with fitness+nutrition. For example: Watch TV while prepping food.
If it was high-priority stuff, does it happen often? That’s OK! Life happens. Return to your goals and keep practicing. Set small weekly health+fitness goals and keep improving your systems. Get coaching to develop better systems and realistic goals.

As you can see, “being healthy and fit” is like an iceberg. Eating well and workout out is only the tip of the iceberg and it’s supported by all the thinking, prioritizing, strategizing and planning underneath.

Aaron Gilbert, CSCS, owns Longevity Athletics and can be reached at 520-261-4661 and Aaron@LongevityAthletics.com.

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Houses for sale saw a lot of activity around Maricopa in May. Photo by Adam Wolfe

By Brian Petersheim

Brian Petersheim, Realtor. Photo by Victor Moreno

The Villages? Rancho El Dorado? Tortosa? Alterra? Everyone that is introduced to the city of Maricopa asks, “Which is the best subdivision?” When shopping subdivisions, amenities can play an important role in determining whether a community is the right fit or not. Buyer should begin their search by asking themselves a few questions…

  1. How important are amenities?
  2. How important is drive time into Phoenix/Chandler?
  3. How important is the monthly HOA fee?
  4. What does that monthly HOA fee provide?

Read on, my friends….



Acacia Crossings

750 Homes/lots: Subdivision is completed

HOA: $71.50/month. Basic cable OR credit toward Internet included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, basketball courts.

Fun Fact: The HOA actually modified a walkway from the center of Acacia to be able to walk to the stores in the Basha’s center, so resident wouldn’t have to walk or bike all the way around the subdivision to shop!

 

Alterra

862 Homes out of 1005 lots: No current building in the subdivision

HOA: $62.92/month. Basic cable not included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas.

Fun Fact: Much of Alterra was underwater in 1983 due to a flood. Since then, many changes have been made to the “wash system” to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

 

Cobblestone Farms

884 homes on 892 lots: Last homes being completed now.

HOA: $278.45/quarter (92.82/month). Basic cable included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, pool, horseshoes, basketball court, lake, sports field.

Fun Fact: All the homes were built by Fulton homes, while most other subdivisions have multiple builders.

Fun Fact 2: Cobblestone/Fulton built the only basement homes in Maricopa, which are approximately 4,000 square feet.

 

Desert Cedars

418 homes/lots: Subdivision is completed.

HOA: $60/month. Basic cable not included HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas. Desert Cedars is the closest subdivision to Maricopa’s Copper Sky Multigenerational and Aquatic center, which means not only an easy walk to the festivities, but an up close and personal view of the Fourth of July fireworks from your house.

 

DESERT PASSAGE (aka Smith Farms)

548 homes of 705 home sites: Currently building.

HOA: $109/month. Basic cable included in HOA

Amenities– Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, pool, basketball court, sports fields, baseball/softball field.

Fun fact: Desert Passage has a pool, but many people forget about it when talking about subdivisions with pools.

 

GLENNWILDE GROVES

1,412 homes on 1,948 home sites: Currently building

$88.75/month.  Basic cable included in HOA

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, 2 heated pools, tennis, basketball, soccer, baseball/softball, stocked fishing lake.

Fun fact: Some of the sporting fields actually belong to the city’s Pacana Park, but since Glennwilde surrounds the park, they are part of the amenities.

 

HOMESTEAD NORTH

1,568 homes on 2,295 home sites: Currently building,

HOA: $48/month. Basic cable not included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, basketball courts, and lake subdivision.

Fun Fact: DRHorton was supposed to be the only builder in Homestead, so they named the main thoroughfare DRHorton Drive, but when other builders came in and started building, the name was changed to Homestead Drive.

 

MARICOPA MEADOWS

1,537 homes on 1,626 home sites: No current building in the subdivision.

HOA: $219/quarter ($73/month). Basic cable included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, basketball court, outside workout trail, pickle ball court and lake.

Fun Fact: Maricopa Meadows is home to Maricopa’s only full disc golf course.

 

PALO BREA

113 homes on 525 home sites: No current construction.

HOA: $55/month. Basic cable included in HOA

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, basketball courts and home of one of the few Sand Volleyball courts in Maricopa.

Fun Fact: Palo Brea only has homes on about 20 percent of the lots. Beazer Homes was the only builder there. The remaining lots have been for sale by the developer for several years.

 

PROVINCE (Villas or Gemini homes 55+ community)

1,323 homes on 2,124 lots: Currently building

HOA: $917.61/quarter ($305.87/month). Basic cable included in HOA

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, lakes, shuffleboard, tennis, pickle ball, indoor/outdoor pools, full workout facility, craft rooms, poker room, clubhouse, library & BBQ areas

Fun Fact: The smaller Villa or Gemini homes cost more per month on the HOA than the stand alone homes because it includes a roof insurance policy since 2 separate units share a common roof.

 

PROVINCE (Single Family detached 55+ community)

1,323 homes on 2,124 lots – currently building.

HOA: $603.76/quarter ($201.25/month). Basic cable included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, lakes, shuffleboard, tennis, pickleball, indoor/outdoor pools, full workout facility, craft rooms, poker room, clubhouse, library & BBQ areas.

Fun Fact: The entire subdivision of Province is comprised of single story homes only.

 

RANCHO EL DORADO (not Villages or Lakes)

Maricopa’s largest subdivision with 3,381 homes/lots: Subdivision is completed.

HOA: $127.90/quarter ($42.63/month). Basic cable not included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, lake, driving range, restaurant/bar (at the golf course). Maricopa’s only golf course subdivision.

Fun Fact: Rancho El Dorado was Maricopa’s first master planned community; some of the homes were completed in 2002.

 

LAKES at RANCHO EL DORADO (Rancho El Dorado Phase 3)

643 homes on 1,594 home sites: No current construction.

HOA: $62.92/month. Basic cable not included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, lake and water feature.

Fun Fact: It is permissible for residents to use non-motorized boats like canoes or paddle boats on the lake.

 

RANCHO MIRAGE

280 homes on 2,163 home sites: 1 builder currently constructing homes.

HOA: $91.67/month. Basic cable included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, lake with walkout pier and water feature.

Fun Fact: Of the 4 builders that were originally scheduled to build in Rancho Mirage, 2 of them never broke ground and 4 more came in and started building.

 

SANTA ROSA SPRINGS

160 homes out of 788 home lots: 2 builders currently constructing homes.

HOA: $68/month. Basic cable not included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas.

Fun Fact: The original builders in that community used extra insulation for noise reduction because of the proximity of the train tracks.

 

SENITA (Maricopa Groves)

1,375 lots/homes built: Subdivision is completed.

HOA: $65/month. Basic cable INCLUDED in HOA

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas

Fun Fact: Senita 1 and 2 are the parcels west of the bridge over the wash while Senita 3 is the parcel East of the bridge.

 

SORRENTO

366 homes out of 821 lots in the subdivision: Current construction

$63.30/month. Basic cable not included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, lake, splash pad, water feature, tennis courts.

Fun Fact: There are currently 2 new builders quickly putting up homes in Sorrento.

 

TORTOSA

1,055 homes out of 2,462 total home lots: No builders currently constructing homes

HOA: $91.00/month. Basic cable included in HOA.

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, water feature.

Fun Fact: There were several streets in Tortosa with partially built homes, but no builder! The builder ran out of money and went under. Some of the homes were sold unfinished, but eventually the bank came in, finished and sold the homes.

 

VILLAGES at RANCHO EL DORADO

2,086 homes out of 2,104 total lots in the subdivision: Last lots being built on now.

HOA: $86.00/month Basic cable OR credit toward Internet INCLUDED in HOA

Amenities – Walking/biking/jogging paths, children’s playgrounds, BBQ areas, 2 pools, clubhouse w/kitchenette for resident use, workout facility, basketball & tennis courts.

Fun Fact: The original owners of the land where the Villages is located still live in the same house in the villages that they lived in when the subdivision was just farm land. If you look closely driving around Butterfield parkway, you will see a lovely, older home behind a gate with large mature trees! The home was built in 1956.



Please keep in mind that there are specific costs when buying a home in Maricopa’s HOA communities that are not listed here. Each subdivision may have its own fees for community improvement, reserve contribution or working capital that will need to be addressed in the offer to purchase a home. HOA disclosure paperwork costs approximately $400 and that specific fee must be paid by the seller. The rest are negotiable.

If you are considering buying or selling a Maricopa property and have questions, please reach out to a Maricopa real estate expert.

 

Brian Petersheim is a Realtor with Homesmart Success. He can be reached at 602-206-9644 or  BrianPetersheim@gmail.com

By Hollace Lyon 

Hollace Lyon (submitted photo)

You’ve probably heard about the recent increase in secondary property tax rates in Maricopa as a result of the Legislature’s change to desegregation-related school funding. There’s been a lot of good talk about the merits of the funding, but I’d like to talk about process and priorities.

I believe real fiscal responsibility means not only protecting taxpayer dollars, but actually providing taxpayers what they are paying for, and that’s been a chronic problem with our Legislature. Yes, we should care whether the deseg dollars are being spent wisely, but we should also care that all students have an opportunity for equity and access. To that end, I’d rather see our Legislature stop encouraging the siphoning away of over $1 billion in vouchers and private school tax credits with no accountability, instead of chasing down $200 million state-wide in desegregation funds. How about taking a serious look at the almost $14 billion in annual tax giveaways increased every year since the 1990s, now nearly 1.5 times the state budget.

Don’t get me wrong, I believe there are legitimate reasons for tax incentives. But those incentives should deliver a return on investment— a principle that should guide our expenditure of all precious taxpayer dollars.

Instead, Senator Steve Smith decries desegregation funds as “unfair to taxpayers.” What is “unfair to taxpayers” is diverting the funding they pay to improve schools and roads, not fixing those schools and roads, and then forcing the counties and cities to raise more taxes to actually get it done. Prop. 301 inflation funding and Highway User Revenue Fund (HURF) monies are just two examples. Another is the Legislature’s “funneling of $25 million away from our 911 center fund” and, you guessed it, forcing funding responsibility down to localities. You’re now paying twice for the same service.  Maricopa Councilwoman Nancy Smith noted recently, “I have a big concern with the common practice that our legislators have of balancing the budget on the backs of cities and counties,” when she was talking about yet another example.

Rather than looking for more ways to cut funding to our district schools, state lawmakers ought to be finding ways to provide them stable, dedicated funding. After all, one of their primary constitutional responsibilities is to “provide for the establishment and maintenance of a general and uniform public school system” across the state. Yes, they must also balance the budget. But they have many tools at their disposal without continually shifting costs down onto the backs of our small businesses and citizens, the ones who ultimately end up paying for it.

Imagine if instead of dictating from on high, our state lawmakers believed in collaborating with schools districts, cities, and counties. Imagine, if they did their jobs without concern for who got the credit.  Imagine…then vote with that end in mind.  Rewarding their behavior just emboldens it.  Send them the signal that it’s time for a new approach.

Hollace Lyon is a Democrat candidate for LD11 House of Representatives.

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The family of Sen. John McCain released his farewell statement Monday, two days after his death at the age of 81:


My fellow Americans, whom I have gratefully served for sixty years, and especially my fellow Arizonans,

Thank you for the privilege of serving you and for the rewarding life that service in uniform and in public office has allowed me to lead. I have tried to serve our country honorably. I have made mistakes, but I hope my love for America will be weighed favorably against them.

I have often observed that I am the luckiest person on earth. I feel that way even now as I prepare for the end of my life. I have loved my life, all of it. I have had experiences, adventures and friendships enough for ten satisfying lives, and I am so thankful. Like most people, I have regrets. But I would not trade a day of my life, in good or bad times, for the best day of anyone else’s.

I owe that satisfaction to the love of my family. And I owe it to America. To be connected to America’s causes – liberty, equal justice, respect for the dignity of all people – brings happiness more sublime than life’s more fleeting pleasures. Our identities and sense of worth are not circumscribed but enlarged by serving good causes bigger than ourselves.

“Fellow Americans” — that association has meant more to me than any other. I lived and died a proud American. We are citizens of the world’s greatest republic, a nation of ideals, not blood and soil. We are blessed and are a blessing to humanity when we uphold and advance those ideals at home and in the world. We have helped liberate more people from tyranny and poverty than ever before in history. We have acquired great wealth and power in the process.

We weaken our greatness when we confuse our nationalism with tribal rivalries that have sown resentment and hatred and violence in all the corners of the globe. We weaken it when we hide behind walls, rather than tear them down, when we doubt the power of our ideals, rather than trust them to be the great force for change they have always been.

We are three-hundred-and-twenty-five million opinionated, vociferous individuals. We argue and compete and sometimes even vilify each other in our raucous public debates. But we have always had so much more in common with each other than in disagreement. If only we remember that and give each other the benefit of the presumption that we all love our country, we will get through these challenging times. We will come through them stronger than before. We always do.

Ten years ago, I had the privilege to concede defeat in the election for president. I want to end my farewell to you with the heartfelt faith in Americans that I felt so powerfully that evening.

I feel it powerfully still.

Do not despair of our present difficulties but believe always in the promise and greatness of America, because nothing is inevitable here. Americans never quit. We never surrender. We never hide from history. We make history.

Farewell, fellow Americans. God bless you, and God bless America.



Lying in State at the Arizona State Capitol, Aug. 29

At 10 a.m., a private, formal ceremony inside the Rotunda of the Arizona State Capitol will take place to honor Senator McCain’s life and service to the State of Arizona and the nation. Following the conclusion of the ceremony, the public is welcome to pay their respects to Senator McCain in the Arizona State Capitol Rotunda starting at 2 p.m.

Ceremony
Invocation by Father Edward A. Reese, S.J.
Remarks by Sen. Jon Kyl
Remarks by Gov. Doug Ducey
Presentation of Wreath by Congressman Jim Kolbe
Benediction by Sen. Jeff Flake



Arizona Memorial Service at North Phoenix Baptist Church, Aug. 30

A memorial service to celebrate the life of Sen. McCain will occur at the North Phoenix Baptist Church at 10 a.m. Doors open 8 a.m. local time. All guests need to be in their seats no later than 9:30 a.m. There are no more tickets available.

Ceremony
Prelude
Processional
Welcome and Invocation by Senior Pastor Dr. Noe Garcia
Hymn, “Amazing Grace,” performed by the Brophy Student Ensemble
Reading, Ecclesiastes 3:1-2, read by Bridget McCain
Tribute by Grant Woods
Tribute by Tommy Espinoza
Hymn, performed by Jonah LittleSunday, Navajo flutist
Tribute by Larry Fitzgerald, Jr.
Tribute by Vice President Joe Biden
Reading, 2 Timothy 4:6-8 by Andrew McCain
Song, “Arizona,” performed by the Brophy Student Ensemble
Message by Father Edward Reese
Hymn, “Going Home,” performed by Bryan Jeffries on bagpipe
Benediction and Dismissal by Senior Pastor Dr. Noe Garcia
Recessional, “My Way,” original music by Frank Sinatra

At the conclusion of the ceremony, Sen. McCain’s motorcade will depart North Phoenix Baptist Church for Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. If so inclined, flowers may be sent to your local VA Hospital.



Lying in State at the U.S. Capitol, Aug. 31

At approximately 11 a.m. ET, a ceremony will take place in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C., honoring the life and service of Sen. McCain.

Ceremony
Prelude
Invocation by Reverend Patrick J. Conroy, S.J., Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives
Remarks by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
Remarks by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
Remarks by Vice President Mike Pence
Presentation of the Senate Wreath by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer
Presentation of the House Wreath by Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
Presentation of the Administration Wreath by Vice President Mike Pence
Benediction by Rear Admiral Barry C. Black, Chaplain of the U.S. Senate
Postlude

At the conclusion of the formal ceremony, Mrs. Cindy McCain will be escorted to view the casket and lead the procession. At 2 p.m. ET, doors will open for the public to pay their respects to Senator McCain as he lies in state in the Capitol with a Capitol Police Guard of Honor in attendance. All visitors must enter through the Capitol Visitor Center and will be directed to the Rotunda to pay their respects to Senator McCain 2-8 p.m. ET. The Guard of Honor will remain throughout the night.



Washington National Cathedral Ceremony, Sept. 1

At approximately 8:30 a.m. ET, Sen. McCain will be carried with ceremony from the U.S. Capitol by Armed Forces Body Bearers, secured and moved by motorcade to Washington National Cathedral. The motorcade will pause at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial where Mrs. Cindy McCain will lay a ceremonial wreath honoring all whose lives were lost during the Vietnam War. At 10 a.m., a national memorial service celebrating the life of Sen. McCain will take place at Washington National Cathedral. Sen. McCain’s family, friends, congressional colleagues and staff, as well as U.S. and international leaders have been invited to attend and participate in the service.

Ceremony
Anthems in Procession by The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Bishop of Washington
Welcome by The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, Dean of Washington National Cathedral
Hymn 608, “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” (The Navy Hymn), sung by the congregation
Tribute by Meghan McCain
Reading of Poem, “The Requiem,” by Jimmy McCain
Anthem, “My Country Tis of Thee,” sung by the congregation
Tribute by Senator Joseph I. Lieberman
Tribute by Dr. Henry A. Kissinger
Anthem, “Battle Hymn of the Republic”
Tribute by President George W. Bush
Tribute by President Barack H. Obama
Anthem, “Battle Hymn of the Republic”
The Collect for Burial by The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, Dean of Washington National Cathedral
Prayer for Those Who Grieve by The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, Dean of Washington National Cathedral
Reading, Wisdom 3:1-5, 9, by Senator Kelly Ayotte
Anthem, “The Lord is my Shepherd,” led by the Washington National Cathedral Choir
Reading, 2 Corinthians 5:6-8, read by Sidney McCain
Hymn, “How Great Though Art,” sung by the congregation
Gospel, John 15:12-13, read by Senator Lindsey Graham
Homily by Father Edward A. Reese, S.J.
Musical Reflection, “Danny Boy,” sung by Renee Fleming
The Lord’s Prayer
The Prayers
Concluding Prayer, led by The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Bishop of Washington
Anthem, “America the Beautiful”
The Commendation, led by The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, Dean of Washington National Cathedral; The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Bishop of Washington; and Father Edward A. Reese, S.J.
The Blessing by The Right Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, Bishop of Washington
The Dismissal by The Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, Dean of Washington National Cathedral
Postlude, “Final,” from Symphony I, OP.14 and Piece d’orgue, BWV 572

Pallbearers
Vice President Joseph Biden
Actor Warren Beatty
Bloomberg CEO Michael Bloomberg
Secretary William Cohen
Sen. Gary Hart
Businessman Stephen Dart
Pegasus COO Richard Davis
Eudy Company President Carla Eudy
Sen. Russ Feingold
Sen. Phil Gramm
Boris Nemtsov Foundation for Freedom Chairman Vladimir Kara-Murza
Gov. Tom Ridge
Former Chief of Staff Mark Salter
FedEx President Fred Smith
Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse



He will be laid to rest at the U.S. Naval Academy Cemetery in Annapolis, Maryland.

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Submitted photo

Saturday, the Maricopa High School Marching Rams traveled to Chase Field as part of the annual Diamondbacks Band Night. The Marching Bands performed the National Anthem among bands from Tombstone High School, Desert Mountain High School, Ironwood High School, Raymond S. Kellis High School and Rancho Solano Prep. The massed band was led by Rebecca Robinson, band director from Tombstone High School. Following the performance, the band enjoyed watching the first-place Dbacks take on the Seattle Mariners.

The Maricopa High School Band was honored to be part of this event and would like to thank Rebecca Robinson for her leadership of the group as well as Tom Demeter and the Arizona Diamondbacks for coordinating this event and making this opportunity possible.

The Marching Rams will be back for Homecoming on Sept. 14 and open their competitive season at the AzMBA Millennium High School Show on Sept. 22.

By Julia R. Gusse

Julia Gusse (submitted photo)

It is with great pleasure that I provide Leon Potter with my full endorsement as he seeks election onto the City of Maricopa’s Council. Mr. Potter is running as a write-in candidate and I have had the pleasure of serving with him on our City Council. I am of the belief that our city is headed in a good direction, but has stalled along the way. Furthermore, it is my opinion that change is needed to push and accelerate our progress. He has proven to me, and to this community, that he does not go along to get along and does not subscribe to the status quo of our current leadership. For those reasons, I am happy to provide him with my endorsement and I wish him nothing but luck and good will as he pursues a seat on our city council.

Julia R. Gusse is a member of the Maricopa City Council.

This week’s activities include Game Night and a Labor Day Pool Party. Below is a reminder that Tuesday is Primary Election Day. For details on these and other listings, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Election Day, polls open 6 a.m.-7 p.m.

Seniors play Pinochle at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

MHS Boys’ Golf is at 3 p.m. at Ak-Chin Southern Dunes, 48456 W. Hwy. 238.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

MHS Volleyball is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Art & Sip is at 6:30 p.m. at True Grit Tavern, 20800 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 101.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood is at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Multigenerational Game Night is at 6:30 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Pathway Football starts at 7 p.m. at Pacana Park, 19000 N. Porter Road.

SATURDAY

Labor Day Weekend Pool Party is at 6 p.m. at Copper Sky Aquatic Center, 44345 W Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

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Senior Isaiah Crawford takes the ball downfield for the Maricopa Rams.

In a messy, dusty Game 2, Maricopa High School’s football team lost at Millennium, 26-21. That evened the Rams’ record at 1-1. The Tigers took a 12-7 lead over Maricopa in the first quarter. After pushing that to 26-7 in the third, Millennium did not score again. With both offensive lines showing vulnerability, the quarterbacks were under pressure all game and Maricopa coach Brandon Harris began rotating his QBs, Jordan Huddleston and Daxton Redfern, with mixed results. In the third quarter in the middle of a full-blown dust storm, Maricopa used a 70-yard kickoff return by Isaiah Crawford to set up a 12-yard touchdown run by Jacob Cowing. With time running out near game’s end and little official attention to the play clock or game clock, Mister Chavis ran in from the 6 for the final score. Harris told the Rams he was proud of them for never quitting despite being down. Maricopa next plays a non-region game at Apollo Friday at 7 p.m.

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Jeff Kramarczyk is closing the doors of Crate Coffee this week but will still be in business. Photo by Mason Callejas

By Fran Lyons

While many home-based businesses in Maricopa are trying to build their way into a storefront, others are taking the opposite route.

Crate Coffee Market, the highest-rated coffee shop in Maricopa according to Yelp reviewers, had a retail space for five years on Hathaway Avenue. But owner Jeff Kramarczyk has opted to close the doors Aug. 26.

“The virtual marketplace has presented an opportunity to expand more globally while still meeting and developing our goals,” he said.

In a press release announcing the closing, Kramarczyk said Crate had fallen short in one of five goals: “Build a wholly unique, economically viable, retail business on word of mouth only.”

The primary reason for leaving the storefront is to focus attention, time and effort on the virtual side of the business.

“For many customers, locally and across the U.S., Crate Coffee has only ever been a virtual market,” Kramarczyk said. “Our business began in 2013 with 60-70 percent focus on the distribution side and 30-40 percent on the retail storefront side.”

Photo by Mason Callejas

The expanded business plan does not lessen the number of hours he works. “I don’t consider hours to be relevant in the virtual market,” he said. “It’s 24/7.”

The biggest challenge, he said, “is to continue the relationship aspect with people and the personal experience they had in the store and translate it into the virtual experience. We want to engage people and enable them to interact socially online.”

Despite closing the storefront, his business plan, he said, remains the same.

Echoing that are the co-owners of CrossFit Stand & Battle, which also left its storefront space with its high overhead to literally go home in what was termed a restructuring.

Natalie Richardson and Nate Maxcy of CrossFit Stand & Battle opted to move into garage gyms. Submitted photo

“Bringing it home has its benefits,” said Natalie Richardson, co-owner and director of operations. Her garage in The Villages was converted into a CrossFit gym in July.

The change allows the team to provide the classes and hours to meet the needs of their schedules as well as the clients they coach, she said.

Their business is an affiliate of CrossFit, Inc., an internationally known elite fitness regime designed to define fitness in a measurable way. The workout goal is fitness and health through functional movement and stability.

The business plan, structured on the CrossFit model, is unchanged. It’s just the location that is different.

“Our members are our community,” said co-owner Nate Maxcy, director of coaching. “We truly believe that the relationships we develop and the care and consideration of each other is how we motivate and support each other. We work together as a group.”

Formerly CrossFit 347, Stand & Battle operated out of Suite B102 at 21576 N. John Wayne Parkway. Richardson began her fitness career in pre-natal and post-natal fitness for moms with Stroller Strides. Maxcy has trained as an athlete with CrossFit for years and is also a captain with the Maricopa Fire Department.

When asked why they left the brick-and-mortar store, Maxcy and Richardson said it fit their lifestyle and budget, and the garage gym concept aligned with their philosophy of hands-on instruction. Making the decision to take the business home came as they were approaching a deadline for a new lease agreement. They were no longer willing to put their families at financial risk.

One challenge of moving from a storefront to a virtual or home-based site is convincing customers to come along, too.

Maxcy told clients he would understand if some of them were not comfortable with a garage-gym format while he knew others were introduced to CrossFit in a home gym.

Crate Coffee’s clientele was also disappointed to lose their community spot.

“Many folks are sad that our familiar location will no longer be available,” said Kramarczyk, who, though excited about the new business platform, described his own feelings as mixed. “Thank you to everyone that has crossed Crate Coffee’s threshold. My hope is that we take our shared experiences with us for the rest of our lives and look back on them fondly.”

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Murray Siegel

By Murray Siegel

Sequoia Pathway has two principals, one for the elementary grades and one for the secondary grades.

Last year’s high school principal, Dr. Alfonso F. Alva, was promoted to assistant superintendent. The new secondary principal is Diane Silvia, who grew up in New York and started her career in retail management. Seeking a slower pace and better climate, she and her family moved to Arizona, where she discovered a passion for teaching. She earned a master’s in educational leadership and joined Pathway in 2009, holding various teaching and administrative positions.

Last year, Pathway piloted several new programs to enhance the quality of curriculum and instruction, such as Galileo and Alpine Data Management Systems. Silvia believes these programs will continue to improve the school’s effectiveness. When asked about the new school year, she stated, “I am excited about spearheading our mission at Pathway, which is to cultivate a community of excellence through pride and appreciation for our surroundings, education and self.”

The elementary principal is Rachael Lay, who grew up in Houston, Texas, and holds a bachelor of science degree in elementary education from NAU and a master’s in administration and supervision from the University of Phoenix. She has been in education 13 years and has been principal at Pathway for seven years.

Lay points to the introduction of the Galileo set of academic tools and assessments this year, which has enhanced the daily classroom instruction. She looks forward to the new academic year due to the departmentalization of teaching in grades four through six and the addition of intramural sports.

Mat Reese is the principal at Leading Edge Academy (LEA) and was raised in Niagara Falls, New York. He left New York to attend ASU and received his undergraduate degree there. He received a master’s degree in administration from NAU. Reese was a teacher, coach and principal in public schools for 32 years. He joined LEA as its first principal in 2008.

He points with pride to the student- and parent-friendly nature of the campus, and he has an open-door policy that allows parents to see him without an appointment. His excitement for the new school year is the same anticipation he has each new year, watching students grow academically.

At Legacy Traditional School (LTS), the principal is Amy Sundeen. She grew up in Chicago and received a B.S. from Northern Illinois University. She moved to AZ in 2006 and decided to pursue a career in education through the post-baccalaureate program at Rio Salado College and obtained a master’s degree in educational administration. Joining LTS in 2008 as a special education teacher, she became school principal in 2016.

Sundeen believes in the success of the back-to-basics curriculum which is combined with a fine arts program. She is looking forward to continued success with the new VEX Robotics program this year.


This column appears in the August issue of InMaricopa.

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Lucy Everingham and Rick Gibson, Governing Board President cut the ribbon at the Mel A. Everingham Student Union. Submitted photo

 

By Angela Askey, Executive Director Public Relations and Marketing

Central Arizona College officially celebrated the opening for the new Science Building and Mel A. Everingham Student Union at the Signal Peak Campus on Tuesday, Aug. 21. A ribbon cutting ceremony was held at each building.

CAC welcomed Lucy Everingham, wife of the late Mel A. Everingham, and her family for this special occasion. Everingham served as CAC president from 1973-1984.

Jackie Elliott, CAC President stated, “Students will experience TRUE Learning opportunities in the state of the art learning spaces of our science building and the Mel A. Everingham Student Union will be a destination for our students and community members.”

The new science building features nine teaching labs and associated prep spaces, a Maker Space/STEM classroom, faculty offices, support spaces and student gathering areas.

Austin King with DPR Construction shared unique features of the building. “Prefabricated panels were used for the exterior skin, providing greater quality control and faster construction times than conventional methods.”

Daniel Childers of Architekton exclaimed, “The efficient and functional learning space of the science building is designed to draw and engage students in a 21st Century education atmosphere.”

The Mel A. Everingham Student Union is home to the Vaquero Lounge, meeting rooms, campus bookstore, public safety offices, a café and dining hall, and outdoor stage that opens to the green space.

Childers said, “The Student Union’s centralized location and easy access will make it an icon on campus; a welcoming home to all students, faculty and athletes to socialize and relax.”

 

 

The Maricopa Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and City of Maricopa host the first roundtable luncheon and open discussion on current challenges small-business owners face growing their business.

The event is Sept. 12 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Central Arizona Community College. Deadline to RSVP is Sept. 10.

The luncheon is free.

“Small businesses are important influencers of economic growth keep our economy moving,” Business Development Specialist Ayesha Maxwell said. “Maricopa has a large population of small businesses and we would like to focus on scaling those businesses to capacity and working with organizations like SBDC to help facilitate technical assistance.”

Organizers want stories and feedback from Maricopa business owners regarding their goals and obstacles they face. A better understanding of the experiences of Maricopa small-business owners will help to create strategic programming and educational workshops specifically designed to develop businesses.

The college is at 17945 Regent Drive. Click to register

Stay tuned for workshops on:

  • Marketing
  • Access to Capital
  • Financial Business Planning
  • Capacity Building Training
  • Business Planning
  • Business Certifications
  • Google: Get your business online

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Christine Dickinson

 

By Christine Dickinson

In November of 2016, the voters of Maricopa passed a maintenance and operations override for our school district. Voters were educated on the three main goals of this override:

1. Lower class sizes through the hiring new educators

2. Increase instructional technology

3. Allow for expanded instructional programs including an alternative high school program at Maricopa High School.

No one worked harder on the override campaign than Councilmember Vincent Manfredi.

Vince arranged for weekly meetings, which were often attended by fellow Councilman Henry Wade and Constable Bret Roberts (candidate for LD11 House seat), but meetings were just the tip of the iceberg for this campaign. Councilmember Manfredi organized fundraisers, phone banks, social media coverage and neighborhood canvassing. Vince sacrificed time with his family to help Maricopa organize and run an effective campaign.

The override positions were filled prior to the beginning of the 2017 school year and helped to lower the class sizes in MUSD and provide for support positions within the District. Nearly 600 student laptops were purchased and ready to use on the first day of the school year. RAM Academy was also up and running for students seeking an alternative program for graduation within Maricopa Unified.

None these accomplishments would not have been possible without the hard work of Councilman Manfredi and the team.

I was proud to be the staff liaison for the election that year and see the countless hours that Vince put into the campaign. I am proud of the partnership that City Council has formed with our schools to strengthen community involvement in our schools. I am also proud to see Councilmember Wade at nearly every School Board meeting I attend.

With all of this said I am so proud to see two of our councilmembers being so involved in our schools in so many facets. In case you did not know, they have also served on our annual MUSD20 District Budget Committees, attend many extra-curricular activities and donate time to our schools.

I am proud to vote for incumbents Henry Wade and Vincent Manfredi for Maricopa City Council and ask everyone to do the same.

Christine Dickinson is a technology integration specialist at MUSD.