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By Michelle Chance

A local group is thinking outside the box when it comes to traditional libraries.

MOMS Club of Maricopa will utilize the help of a boy scout to construct three “little free libraries” in local subdivisions by June.

The concept and design plan are inspired from the non-profit organization of the same name.

The little library is a small, wooden structure fixed atop a post. A hinged door swings open to reveal books on shelves. A latch secures the door and literature inside.

The local group of stay-at-home moms considers it a way to build a sense of community where “people come in and are able to give something and take something as well,” said MOMS Club Secretary Jomarie Bradt.

The book swap operates on an honor system, according to members. There is no sign-out list or time limit. A book should be returned or replaced by another. And it’s all done free to the reader.

Club President Jessica Holmes said the project is not meant to replace the public library but provide children even more access to books.

A Boy Scout from Troop 993 will organize the construction and installation of the group’s first three libraries as part of his Eagle Scout project.

The first will be mounted near a playground at Lousandra Drive and Kristal Lane in Senita. Supplies will likely be donated from area hardware stores. His project will also include a book drive.

MOMS Club of Maricopa Board Members meet at Pacana Park to discuss the future of little libraries in local neighborhoods. (From left): Treasurer Sophia Ruiz, Secretary Jomarie Bradt, Vice President Emily Marney and President Jessica Holmes. Not pictured: Member Vice President Ashley Wallace-Crutchfield. Photo by Michelle Chance

Other libraries could pop up in Cobblestone and Alterra South before next summer, given funding and approval from homeowners associations, members said.

It’s the group’s goal to install more than 10 little libraries in Maricopa neighborhoods – three every year, Holmes said.

Other funding will come directly from the club. Members will monitor the libraries in weekly rotations to ensure books are stocked and clean. Members plan to host book drives to keep the supply steady.

The local moms’ group has been a charter of MOMS Club International since 2005. Members offer support to fellow mothers through playdates for children from birth to school age. The club initiates several service projects every year and donates annually to local nonprofit organizations.

The charter has also recently launched its Just Us Moms Play (JUMP) group which comprises of outings with stay-at-home mothers of school-aged children.

MomsClubOfMaricopaSouth@gmail.com

 

 

 

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How do you like your judges?

At the end of the General Election ballot, voters are asked whether to retain some current Superior Court, Court of Appeals and Supreme Court judges. The Judicial Performance Commission, getting feedback from attorneys, jurors, litigants and witnesses through surveys, found the four Pinal County Superior Court judges on the ballot meet the standards.

Judges Delia Neal, Daniel Washburn and Kevin White each received 27 votes of “meets judicial standards” and none against.

Judge Steven Fuller received 19 votes of “meets judicial standards” and four votes of “does not meet judicial standards.” Six members of the commission did not vote on Fuller. He was the only judge up for affirmation in the state to receive more than one vote of “does not meet judicial standards.” However, his overall average score was still a high 97.75 percent.

Fuller and Neal received their lowest marks among attorneys in “judicial temperament,” with Neal scoring 91 percent and Fuller scoring 85 percent. On the other hand, Washburn scored 100 percent in judicial temperament, and White 99 percent.

Washburn’s lowest marks came from attorneys rating his communications skills at 92 percent. White’s lowest score came from litigants/witnesses rating his integrity at 93 percent. His lowest mark among attorneys was also in integrity (96 percent).

Washburn and Neal scored 100 percent across all categories with litigants and witnesses.

Average survey ratings
Fuller – 97.75%
Neal – 98.3%
Washburn 98.1%
White – 98%

Arizona Supreme Court judges Clint Bolick and John Pelander III are also on the ballot for retention, and both received 27 votes of “meets the standards” and no votes of “does not meet standards.” Bolick had an average score of 94 percent. His lowest score was in judicial temperament at 83 percent. Pelander’s average score was 99.6. His lowest score was a 98 in communication skills.

In Divisions I and II Court of Appeals, four judges are up for retention. All were found to meet the standards, and none received a ruling of “does not meet judicial standards.”

In Division I, Judge Peter Swann had an average score of 96.1. His lowest mark came in “legal ability” with 91 percent. In Division II, Peter Eckerstrom averaged 97.25 percent. His lowest mark was in “legal ability” at 84 percent. Philip Espinosa’s average was 92.7 percent. His lowest mark, too, was in “legal ability” at 82 percent. Christopher Staring scored 98.86 percent, with the lowest mark of 96 percent coming in “legal ability” and “administrative performance.”


This information appears in the October issue of InMaricopa.

© 2013 Richard Schultz/Courtesy of 50 Eggs, Inc.

By Angela Askey
Executive Director Public Relations and Marketing

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, Central Arizona College’s Phi Theta Kappa, Student Government Association, The Center for Cultural & Civic Engagement and The Visual and Performing Arts Division will host a special viewing of the documentary, Underwater Dreams.

Underwater Dreams, narrated by Michael Peña, chronicles the story of how four Phoenix-area high school students, the sons of undocumented Mexican immigrants, learned how to build underwater robots and compete against MIT in the process.

The viewings are free and open to community members, students and staff.

The local showing is Oct. 15, 3-5 p.m. in room A102 on the Maricopa campus, 17945 N. Regent Drive.

 

The annual Mud Run, live musical theater and Hispanic Heritage Month activities are part of the activities this week n Maricopa. For details on these events and others, or to add your own, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Kids Bilingual Story Time is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

MUSD Governing Board Special Meeting is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Unified School District, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

Kids Bilingual Story Time is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood is at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

“Cabaret” is by Maricopa Community Theatre at 7 p.m. at Leading Edge Academy, 18700 N. Porter Road.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Explore the Works of Frida Kahlo at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

“Cabaret” is performed by Maricopa Community Theatre at 7 p.m. at Leading Edge Academy, 18700 N. Porter Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

“Cabaret” is performed by Maricopa Community Theatre at 7 p.m. at Leading Edge Academy, 18700 N. Porter Road.

SATURDAY

Maricopa Mud Run is at 7 a.m. at Copper Sky Regional Park, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Blvd.

Coffee with the Chief is at 8 a.m. at Copper Sky Police Substation, 17985 N. Greythorne Drive.

“Cabaret” is performed by Maricopa Community Theatre at 2 p.m. and at 7 p.m. at Leading Edge Academy, 18700 N. Porter Road.

SUNDAY

Narcotics Anonymous meets at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

By Barry R. Goldman

Barry Goldman

The race for constable in the Republican Primary for the Maricopa-Stanfield Justice Court Precinct was a close and hard-fought election, but it’s not over. The General Election in November has yet to determine the final winner.

Most people would expect a Republican to throw support to the winning candidate of that party. But I can’t.

Believe me, it’s not sour grapes. I got to know each of the Republican candidates, and, unfortunately, the winner left a sour taste left in my mouth from my experience with him during the course of the primary campaign. I believe Bill Griffin took the high road during the campaign, and is an honest man. I can’t say the same for the other. That’s why I cannot support him.

The constable candidate should be ethical, honest and fair dealing in every way. I believe at the least, the Republican primary winner exaggerated his experience and abilities trying to gain political advantage. He’s unqualified, in my opinion. Being truthful about oneself matters.

The duties of the constable are to serve and execute papers for the Justice Court, and once in office, they must receive mandatory training per statute. Just because someone is a member of the Sheriff’s Posse does not give him the training or experience to be a constable. I should know – I’ve been a process server for over 31 years and am a qualified Continuing Legal Education instructor for process servers. We do many of the same things that constables do.

The duties of the constable cross party lines, regardless of who holds the office – it’s not a legislative position. I therefore have to look at the person who is the best fit for the job, regardless of their party affiliation. Whether you are a Republican or Democrat, pick the person whom you want to hire, not the party. For the constable, party affiliation really doesn’t mean anything, because everyone can get served.

Barrry R. Goldman is a process server and resident of Maricopa.

 

By Vincent Manfredi

Vincent Manfredi

When you go to vote this coming election, I think the choice for constable in Maricopa and Stanfield is clear.

Glenn Morrison is my choice and I ask you to also support him. Glenn puts his life on the line to protect you and I every time he puts on his Pinal County Sheriff Office Posse uniform. He has volunteered thousands of hours in the last 7 years patrolling communities in Pinal County ensuring the safety of the residents. Glenn does not get paid to be a Posse member but does it as a service to his community. What could be a better example of community service?

Glenn has been part of the community for years well before he decided to run for office. It is hard to think of someone more suited to hold the office of Constable. Glenn is endorsed by Pinal County Supervisor and former Maricopa Mayor Anthony Smith, Current Maricopa Mayor Christian Price, Current Vice Mayor Peg Chapados, Council Member Nancy Smith, Current Constable Bret Roberts, State Sen. Steve Smith, State Representatives Mark Finchem and Vince Leach, Pinal County Deputy Association, Firefighters Local and others. With that much support it’s a good bet he is known to be involved and active, in Maricopa and beyond.

So, whether you vote on election day or early ballot, vote Morrison for Constable.

Vincent Manfredi is a Maricopa Council Member.

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The General Election is Nov. 6. The following are candidates for office that affect Maricopa. In purple are candidates you will see at Saturday’s Town Hall in Maricopa. Learn more at MaricopaEvents.com.

Ready to vote?
Last day to register to vote: Oct. 9
Early ballots mailed: Oct. 10
Early in-person voting at three Recorder’s Office locations begins: Oct. 10

U.S. Senate
Democrat Kyrsten Sinema
Green Angela Green
Republican Martha McSally
Write-ins: Sheila Bilyeu (Democrat), Michael DeCarlo (independent), Robert Kay (Republican), Jonathan Ringham (other), Benjamin Wirtz (Republican)

Kyrsten Sinema (left) and Martha McSally

U.S. Congressional District 1
Democrat Tom O’Halleran*
Republican Wendy Rogers
Write-in: David Shock (independent)

Tom O’Halleran (left) and Wendy Rogers

Governor
Democrat David Garcia
Green Angel Torres
Republican Doug Ducey*
Write-ins: Arthur Ray Arvizu (other), James “Marvelman” Gibson II (other), Christian Komor (independent), Patrick Masoya (independent)

David Garcia (left) and Doug Ducey

Secretary of State
Democrat Katie Hobbs
Republican Steve Gaynor

Katie Hobbs (left) and Steve Gaynor

Attorney General
Democrat January Contreras
Republican Mark Brnovich*

January Contreras (left) and Mark Brnovich

State Treasurer
Democrat Mark Manoil
Republican Kimberly Yee

Mark Manoil (left) and Kimberly Yee

Superintendent of Public Instruction
Democrat Kathy Hobbs
Republican Frank Riggs
Write-in: Matthew Harris (Democrat)

Kathy Hobbs (left) and Frank Riggs

Mine Inspector
Democrat William “Bill” Pierce
Republican Joe Hart*

Bill Pierce (left) and Joe Hart

Corporation Commission (vote for 2)
Democrat Sandra Kennedy
Democrat Kiana Maria Sears
Republican Rodney Glassman
Republican Justin Olson*
Write-in: Neil DeSanti (Republican)

Sandra Kennedy (from left), Kiana Sears, Rodney Glassman and Justin Olson

State Senate District 11
Democrat Ralph Atchue
Green Mohammad Arif
Republican Venden “Vince” Leach

Ralph Atchue (left) and Vince Leach

State House District 11 (vote for 2)
Democrat Hollace Lyon
Democrat Marcela Quiroz
Republican Mark Finchem*
Republican Bret Roberts

Hollace Lyon (from left), Marcela Quiroz, Mark Finchem and Bret Roberts

Clerk of Pinal County Superior Court
Republican Amanda Stanford*

Maricopa/Stanfield Justice of the Peace
Republican Lyle Riggs*

Maricopa/Stanfield Constable
Democrat Andre LaFond
Republican Glenn Morrison

Andre LaFond (left) and Glenn Morrison

*incumbent


This item appears in the October issue of InMaricopa. Photos of Attorney General candidates have been corrected from the printed version. We apologize for the error.

Dana Lynn Helton

Dana Lynn Helton Sr. died peacefully in his sleep at home surrounded by family and his beloved dogs on Sept. 29, 2018, just as he wished.

Dana was born on Dec. 2, 1953, in Winchester, Kentucky. He grew up in and around Conway and Berea, Kentucky. He was loved by anyone he met. He was a very soft-spoken man without a mean bone in his body. He was forever pulling jokes and pranks on friends and family alike, but it was mostly his family.

Dana was married to Debra (Day) Wallace for 18 years. They had the amazing boys, Derrick, Dana Jr. and Dale. He then married Karin (Heady) Helton, whom he was married to at the time of his passing. They had three amazing children as well, Joshua, Rebecca and Charles. Dana’s family was his world; he lived for his children.

Dana is preceded in death by his father, Willard Clayton Helton (1995), his mother, Dora Elizabeth (Sharkey) Helton (2011) and his brother-in-law, Randall Mink.

He is survived by his wife Karin (Heady) Helton, son Derrick (Sarah) Helton, son Dana (Roberta) Helton Jr., son Dale (Billie )Helton, son Joshua Helton, daughter Rebecca Lynn Helton, son Charles Helton, daughter Sandi Wilk (adopted), daughter Jolysa Helton, brother Roger (Peggy) Helton, brother Willard (Judy) Helton, sister Eva (Brownie) Mink, sister Cindy (Rick Beasley) Hylton, 25 grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, many nieces and nephews and hundreds of friends.

Services are Friday, Oct. 5, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 45235 W. Honeycutt Ave., across from Maricopa High School. Viewing is at 1 p.m., and the funeral is at 2 p.m.

Pall Bearers: Derrick Helton, Dana Helton, Jr., Dale Helton, Seanavon, Davian Helton, Chandler Helton, Christopher Helton, Nick Yzaguirre. Honorary : Roger Helton, Willard (Sonny) Helton, Joshua Helton, Charles Helton, Doug Riley, Tommy Thompson, Raymond Carroll, Wyatt Haardt, Jason McKee, Eva (Brownie) Mink, Cindy Hylton, Rebecca Helton.

In lieu of flowers, donations to help with funeral expenses can be sent to Horizon Funeral Care, 480-338-1497.

Photo by Bruce McLaughlin

This week’s damage caused by flash flooding in Hidden Valley, specifically through Vekol Wash, is still being determined. Flowing water blocked some roads and destroyed others. Land, homes and outbuildings were damaged. Ralston Road, Amarillo Valley Road and Louis Johnson Road all had sections washed out. Pinal County estimates 20 affected homes. The rushing water moved north and flooded Ak-Chin Southern Dunes Golf Course with “catastrophic” results, causing more damage and forcing the course’s closure until at least next week. Bruce McLaughlin of McLaughlin Air shared photos of what he witnessed, including Greg McLaughlin rescuing his 4-year-old Arabian colt from the corner of Warren and Papago roads, where the Vekol crested and flowed into homes.

Photo by Bruce McLaughlin
Photo by Bruce McLaughlin
Photo courtesy Ak-Chin Southern Dunes
Photo by Bruce McLaughlin
Photo by Bruce McLaughlin
Photo by Bruce McLaughlin
Photo by Bruce McLaughlin
Photo by Bruce McLaughlin
Photo by Bruce McLaughlin

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Arizona has five propositions on the ballot for the General Election. They range from solar power to education, and most are very divisive. Learn more about the propositions at the InMaricopa.com General Election Town Hall on Saturday.

Prop 125
The Arizona Constitution prohibits diminishing public retirement system benefits. Prop 125 would create an amendment to permit adjusting benefits for retired corrections officers and elected officials as an answer to underfunded pensions. The Legislature already passed Senate Bill 1442 and House Bill 2545 to permit the adjustments; the proposition allows the legislation to go into practice and replace cost-of-living increase with a new, compounding cost-of-living adjustment. The adjustment cannot exceed 2 percent of the base benefit.

For

Public Safety Personnel Retirement System Board of Trustees: “Proposition 125 also will shore up the state’s underfunded Elected Officials’ Retirement Plan and the Corrections Officer Retirement Plan.”

Pinal County Supervisor Anthony Smith: “High pension costs are burdening local taxpayers and crowding out available resources for vital public health, criminal justice and road maintenance responsibilities… These reforms will help rein in costs and protect the taxpayer, while providing a sustainable benefit for existing retirees and a private sector-type defined contribution program for future employees.

Against

Eric Hahn, Tucson: “Corrections officers who are retired fulfilled their employment agreement with their employer and the retirement plan. They should get all the benefits that they were promised and successfully worked for. The Arizona State legislature should not be proposing changes to retiree pensions after the fact. The Corrections Officer Retirement plan is the strongest in Arizona. No changes need to be made except for the Arizona State Legislature to stop raiding all the trust funds and using that money for other areas.”


Prop 126
A proposed constitutional amendment would prohibit the taxation of any service that was not taxed as of Dec. 31, 2017, and prohibit the state, counties and cities or towns from imposing new or increasing existing sales tax or any transaction-based fee.

Backers include Citizens for Fair Tax Policy, Arizona Real Estate.

For

Holly Mabery, chair, Citizens for Fair Tax Policy, Cottonwood: “Sales taxes hit low-and middle-income families hardest. The Protect Arizona Taxpayers Act protects those who are least able to afford new taxes, including senior citizens, the disabled and others on fixed incomes.”

Chad Heinrich, state director, National Federation of Independent Business: “Imagine paying more for childcare services, rent, installations or repairs in your home, or automotive service for your car. These are just a few services provided by small businesses that could someday be taxed if we don’t act to prevent it… This proposition provides certainty and a simple protection for Arizona citizens and businesses against tax-and-spend politicians and bureaucrats who may seek to extract a new tax from us.”

Against

Grand Canyon Institute: “Currently the state foregoes about $12 billion by exempting services from taxation. GCI does not advocate applying sales taxes broadly to services, but Prop. 126 would prevent consideration of possibly taxing select services, say advertising, at even a rate as low as 1 percent.”

Michael Shelton, retired Foreign Service Officer, Tempe: “Our modern economy is becoming a service-based economy. The Arizona Department of Revenue estimates that the value of services sold already exceeds the value of goods sold in this state. If we started a sales tax on some of those transactions, it would be possible to lower the state’s sales tax rate.”


Prop 127

A constitutional amendment would require electric companies (but not government utilities like Salt River Project) to sell increasing amounts of renewable energy by increasing the portion of their retail energy sales generated from renewable energy to 50 percent by 2030.

Backers include Clean Energy for a Healthy Arizona, Natural Resources Defense Council and Conservative Alliance for Solar Energy.

For

David Garcia, governor candidate Phoenix: “The Clean Energy for A Healthy Arizona initiative will position Arizona as the solar superpower it should be by increasing the amount of our energy that comes from renewable sources to 50 percent by 2030.

William Mundell, Paradise Valley, and Sandra Kennedy, Phoenix, former Corporation Commissioners: “APS/Pinnacle West has unethically spent millions of customer dollars to elect and control the Commission. The result has been to fall behind other states in the use of solar energy. Arizona should be the Solar Capital of the world.

Chris Herstam, former president of the Arizona Board of Regents: “By using millions in ratepayer money, APS has established complete control over the very regulatory body established to keep them in check. Perhaps that is why only 6 percent of Arizona’s power comes from solar despite the fact that we are the sunniest state in the country.”

Kris Mayes, former Arizona Corporation Commissioner: “As a Republican former Arizona Corporation Commissioner, I support increasing the amount of renewable energy produced or purchased by our state’s utilities to 50 percent… By utilizing more solar, wind, biomass and landfill gas, Arizona will tap into what is now the cheapest form of energy available – this will reduce rates for utility customers by more than $4 billion.

Against

Cesar Chavez, Arizona House of Representatives, Phoenix: “As a Democrat, I recognize my opposition to this initiative puts me at odds with some of my colleagues. We all share a common goal of cleaner air and increased reliance on renewable energy, but it’s important we do it the right way… This proposal is being forced on our voters by somebody who has no one’s interests in mind but his own.

Bas Aja, executive vice president, Arizona Cattle Feeders’ Association, Phoenix: “Make no mistake: this California-conceived energy initiative is not about improving our air quality or making Arizona a healthier place to live. In fact, study after study has shown that – not only will this proposal do more harm than good for the environment – it will also result in lost jobs, cause irreparable economic damage and hurt hardworking Arizona families and business owners – including the industry men and women we represent.

Victor Riches, president/CEO, Goldwater Institute, Phoenix: “The debate is not whether we should or should not be looking to renewable energy for our state’s future — the issue is with forcing Arizona’s taxpayers to implement a program that is not fiscally sound.”

Vince Leach, State Representative LD 11, SaddleBrooke: “The consequences of complying with these unrealistic mandates would be catastrophic to Arizona – electric bills would skyrocket, tens of millions of dollars in tax revenue would be lost, thousands of jobs would go away.”



Prop 305

This proposition would enact Senate Bill 1431, expanding the eligibility for Education Empowerment Scholarship Accounts for kindergarten through 12th grade and more funding for low-income students for tuition, textbooks, tutoring, educational therapies at a private or home-based school.

Backers include The Bishops of the Arizona Catholic Conference and Arizona Free Enterprise Club.

For

Cathy Parisi, Tucson: “As Arizona’s population continues to grow, the few of us who choose private schools provide a relief for growing school districts, not a drain.”

Matt Simon, former teacher, Tucson: “Prop 305 has strong accountability and transparency requirements to ensure that these dollars are being spent in accordance with the law and on the student. This is more transparency and accountability than exists for the traditional school system.”

Jason Bedrick, Phoenix: “Our public education system should be designed to meet the needs of children, not the other way around. Students are not mere funding units, but individuals with varied aptitudes, interests and preferences. Different children advance in different subjects at difference paces, and some learn better in certain environments than others. ESAs empower families with greater access to a variety of learning options that best meet their child’s unique needs.”

Against

Charles Siler, former external affairs manager, Goldwater Institute, Scottsdale: “While I am a believer in the ESA program, Proposition 305 is not well thought out. They could have written the bill in a much more responsible way that fixed existing flaws in the ESA program and made accessing ESAs more just.”

Susan Collins, Kingman: “Even if money is not taken directly from your local district and charter schools (both publicly funded), money is taken from the education budget on the state level. That effects every public district, charter, school, teacher and student in the state of Arizona.”

Susan Edwards, ESA Family Network, Tempe: “Those in favor of Prop. 305 are exploiting our children to crack open the funding door for private religious education. Our children were paraded around as the justification for a voucher expansion for those seeking a private religious education. ESA benefits will not go away for children with disabilities if Prop. 305 is rejected.”


Prop 306

This change to the Citizens Clean Elections Act would prohibit clean-election candidates from transferring any money from their campaign funds to a political party or other tax-exempt organization that influences elections.

Backers include Stop Taxpayer Money for Political Parties and Americans for Prosperity.

Henry Ritter, Scottsdale: “Of all the problems I have heard people complain about in Arizona, I have never once heard someone say the political parties need more money. That is why it is strange that the Arizona Clean Elections Commission voted to give government money — your money — to political parties so they could afford to send you campaign advertisements and robo-calls.”

Mark Finchem, House of Representatives LD11, Oro Valley: “In 2016, it was discovered that several Clean Election candidates had contributed over $100,000 to the State Democrat Party. This was an obvious abuse of the system and opens up the possibility that both state parties could look to place candidates on the ballot for the sole purpose of providing Clean Election funds to the party. Even more interesting, Clean Elections included language in the rule to permit participating candidates to contribute to 501(C) organizations. The practical effect of this change is that a candidate is now allowed to give money to a nonprofit (for example, a labor union) that could use the money to support and oppose candidates for office. This activity is far afield from the intentions of the voters to fund individual candidates, not political machines.”

Against

Katie Hobbs, Senate minority leader, Phoenix: “Clean Elections is an independent, bipartisan guardian for our elections. Its job is to protect democracy for all of us, not just billionaires and greedy corporations. It’s part of what makes Arizona great – most states don’t have anything like Clean Elections to hold their politicians accountable. Prop 306 would put Clean Elections under the control of a group of political insiders chosen by the governor. That’s a recipe for less transparency in our state government, and more corruption.”

State legislative contingent from LD26: “Arizona’s democracy is in trouble. We see it every day at the state Capitol. Lobbyists for greedy corporations get the special favors they want from a political establishment that benefits from maintaining this unequal status quo. Meanwhile pleas from students, teachers and parents for well-funded schools go unheard, and working-class families struggle to find good-paying jobs in an economy whose rules are rigged in favor of the elite. Prop 306 is their latest trick to undermine Clean Elections. Don’t fall for it. We fought against Prop 306 as the politicians at the state Capitol passed it (literally) in the middle of the night, because you deserve better.”


This story appears in the October issue of InMaricopa.

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Maricopa City Council marked October as Domestic Violence Awareness Month with a proclamation by Mayor Christian Price. The entry to City Hall was also lighted in purple symbolic of the event.

Whereas, domestic violence is prevalent throughout the region, and more than 90 people lost their lives due to domestic violence in Arizona in 2017, with at least 53 deaths occurring within the Maricopa Association of Governments region; and
Whereas, every 44 minutes in Arizona, one or more children witness domestic violence, and up to 60% of perpetrators of intimate partner violence also abuse their children, according to an Arizona Department of Health Services report; and
Whereas, the trauma and suffering caused by domestic violence destroys families, threatens the safety of neighborhoods, and weakens the ability of communities to thrive; and
Whereas, the City of Maricopa works collaboratively with community agencies to effectively address, prevent, and eradicate domestic violence; and
Whereas, the City of Maricopa is dedicated to ensuring the safety of domestic violence survivors and holding abusers accountable; and
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Christian Price, Mayor of the City of Maricopa, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2018, as DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH in the City of Maricopa.

Dated this 2nd day of October, 2018

An inch and a half of rain has accumulated in Maricopa. Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

Maricopa has accumulated more than 1.5 inches of rain since Monday, according to numbers from the National Weather Service. Some roads were closed and several streets were down to one lane due to flash flooding.

Vince Leach and Ralph Atchue. Photo by Angelica Ramis

There’s something to do for everyone this week in Maricopa. For details on these and other listings, or to add your own, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Kids Bilingual Story Time is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Maricopa Historical Society Meeting is at 5:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Kids Bilingual Story Time is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

City Council Work Session is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

City Council Regular Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

After the Fire is at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Mad Hatter Tea Party is at 3 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.\

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

InMaricopa Town Hall for the General Election is at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Performing Arts Center, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Bark for Life (fundraiser for Relay for Life) is at 10 a.m. at Copper Sky Regional Park, 55345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

All-Maricopa Poetry Slam is at 6:30 p.m. at Honeycutt Coffee, 44400 W. Honeycutt Road, Suite 109.

SUNDAY

Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

By Merry Grace

Merry Grace

The election of our next constable is not one to be taken lightly.  This elected position is for a peace officer tasked with the execution of orders from the Justice Court. These orders can include, but are not limited to, evictions, protection, seizure of property, service of criminal and civil subpoenas and summonses, orders to collect judgments, and more.

As a mom, I am endorsing Mr. Andre LaFond as he brings with him a strong commitment to service and community while using his skills and experience to carry out those orders and tasks. Andre LaFond brings with him 14 years of private law enforcement, experience as an Army veteran, leadership experience as an Eagle Scout and various community outreach training, service and collaborative ethics to put service before self.  Mr. LaFond hopes to further his impact as constable by offering resources and support to people such as evictees or domestic violence victims and expand support programs. He holds this position in the highest regard and will work hard to ensure the safety of our citizens while collaborating with law enforcement.

Most important to me is his desire and commitment to work with the City of Maricopa Police Department to bridge the gap and build a partnership. I have seen Mr. LaFond at school safety meetings, community meetings and various events. Not only does he engage in the discussions and works to become a part of the solutions but he goes the extra step to provide information and resources by way of posting recaps on social media especially when it comes to safety.  We need continued support from our elected officials to lead by example while increasing community engagement and involvement.

I see Mr. LaFond holding this position with the utmost respect while working hard to develop community support and increase partnerships to better our community.  Creating and developing a partnership with local and county law enforcement while bridging the gap with city organizations, schools, citizens and leaders will only lead to a thriving community all while serving and protecting our citizens.

Join me in electing Andre LaFond as our next constable.


Merry Grace is a resident of Maricopa.

Pierre Deck had some frights as a child in Mobile. Photo by Michelle Chance

By Michelle Chance

Have you experienced paranormal activity in Maricopa? Tell us about it at Facebook.com/InMaricopa.

Maricopa’s history is chronicled well into the mid-19th century, when much of the American Southwest was still frontier land.

Most structures and relics from that period have been lost – whether from disaster, vandalism or purposeful destruction in the name of progress with new construction. The romanticized wild west, and the ghost stories that accompany it, however, live on.

Woman in white mourns in the wash

A summer storm lingered above Maricopa as a group of teenagers returned from church camp one evening in 1974.

Brent Murphree, who would later grow up to become vice mayor, was 14 at the time when his mother stopped at Headquarters Café to drop off campers. Inside, Murphree reunited with two friends from school. He waved his mother on for a chance to hang out with buddies.

After dinner, a slow drizzle met the teenagers outside; low-hanging clouds kept the air damp and the August evening cool.

“It’s a perfect setup for a scary story,” Murphree recalled. “It was a dark and stormy night.”

The friends piled in a vehicle and headed east on Honeycutt Road. The unpaved path, illuminated only by headlight beams, was crowded with outstretched branches belonging to pecan groves lining each side.

There was no bridge back then preventing Santa Rosa Wash from carving into the rural road. To continue to the other side, the geography forced motorists down a narrow, steep dip through the wash.

This monsoon, different from the usual, quick-moving, violent storms of its kind, produced a steady stream of runoff water that night.

“The wash was running so we took it really slow and as we got closer to the top, there was a lady standing there and she was all in white,” Murphree said.

An unfamiliar face tends to stick out in rural towns. This fair-haired stranger shook the psyches of the passengers who discovered her standing near the bank, drenched in water from her feet to her thighs.

Murphree thought she must be stranded, lost or even hurt. His attempt to open the door to assist her was met with immediate resistance from the driver, his friend, whose instinct was to place foot to accelerator at the ghostly sight.

“Her face was blank. She didn’t wave. There was no reaction whatsoever,” Murphree said.

The teens had heard the legend of La Llorona before, a woman in white who haunts the river where she killed her children and then herself. But the Mexican folktale and others like it never phased a skeptic like Murphree – until that night.

“That’s how I got really interested in the legend and doing a little bit of research on La Llorona and the white lady,” Murphree said.

The mystery of the woman in white hasn’t been solved, but Murphree said classmates claimed witness to other sightings of La Llorona in other areas where washes run.

 

Mobile’s ‘Ghost House’ spooks neighbors

Spirits reportedly haunt many parts of the Maricopa area beyond the banks of its running waters.

Longtime Maricopa resident Pierre Deck spent most of his childhood living in Mobile, a neighboring community 14 miles west of Maricopa. In the early 1960s, he and his brother entertained themselves by hunting rabbits and exploring the desert.

One day, the teenaged siblings took on a new expedition, one that took them into the bowels of a grand, abandoned house made of wood in their neighborhood. Inside, a grand staircase arched upward to a second story, the ceiling polished with a dusty but still-glistening chandelier.

“We went upstairs and all of a sudden that door shut, and the chandelier started going around,” Deck said.

The boys quickly left the home on their bicycles and later told the experience to a friend down the street. Come sundown, it was time for the Deck brothers to return home.

“We started riding, and all of a sudden the lights come on in the house,” Deck said, adding there was no electric service running to the estate. “Boy, you should have seen us tear them bikes up; we burned rubber.”

The ‘ghost house,’ as residents called it, was later demolished.

The late Suzie Smith at her home, which was south of the railroad tracks. (Maricopa Historical Society)

Haunted homestead south of the tracks

The 1950s in Maricopa were a simpler time, according to Maricopa historian Patricia Brock in her book “Reflections of a Desert Town.” However, it wasn’t without some aspect of paranormal terror.

Many of Brock’s notes are archived by the Maricopa Historical Society. One describes an old adobe home that provided a thrill for many school children.

The “Old Perry Williams and Dallas Smith House,” built in 1884, was a large, 10-room home that once stood south of where the business barn is today. Cactuses, shrubs and trees protected otherwise unobstructed views of the homestead. However, curious kids did get a glimpse from time to time.

“As we approached the house, we would gradually ease out toward the road so we did not disturb anyone or anything that might be beyond the sentinels. We knew it would be death before dawn if we did. One dare devil could not leave well enough alone and just had to push the button. He took a quick peek through the bushes, jumped back and screamed all the way to school. We never did find out what he saw,” Brock’s note alleged.

The home was occupied by Maricopa pioneer Susie Smith until the mid-1950s.

Brock’s book said Maricopa lost its ‘haunted house’ in 1960 when two boys playing with matches near the property accidentally set a blaze that brought the home down.


This story appears in the October issue of InMaricopa.

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Seaman Brianna Barnes with her proud mother Jennifer Alicoate. Submitted photo

Brianna Barnes, a 2018 graduate of Maricopa High School, graduated from U.S. Navy basic training.

She was a cadet in the MHS Air Force Junior ROTC program. She will be a U.S. Navy corpsman. She is training to be a hospital corpsman.

Navy hospital corpsmen provide medical treatment for Sailors and Marines. They may serve as an operating room technician, operate X-ray equipment, construct dental crowns and bridges, administer preventive care, provide emergency medical or dental treatment to Sailors and Marines in the field including working with Navy SEALS, perform clinical tests and more.

  

 

 

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Submitted photo

The Maricopa High School Marching Rams and the MHS Chamber Orchestra both performed before judges during the past week, both collecting strong feedback.

The Marching Rams performed Saturday at the Arizona Marching Band Association (AzMBA) Millennium Show in Goodyear and finished in second place in the 3A class. The band earned praise for establishing solid musical and visual performance fundamentals in the first part of the year, significant contributions from all sections of the band, and growth in percussion and color guard performance.

“We will be using this feedback to build the objectives for our Fall Band Camp for our students Oct. 8-12 and the band will return to competition on Oct. 13 at University of Arizona Band Day,” Director Ivan Pour said.

The band finished just ahead of a very good Verrado High School program and trailing Chandler Perry. Based on judge’s comments, the Marching Rams are off to one of their best starts in recent years.

Friday, the MHS Chamber Orchestra traveled to Campo Verde High School in Gilbert to participate in the ABODA (Arizona Band and Orchestra Directors’ Association) Fall Orchestra Festival. The orchestra performed well, receiving top-notch feedback from a judging panel including Margaret Schmidt, Ph.D., professor of music education at Arizona State University, Cayce Miners, director of orchestras at Tucson Magnet High School in Tucson, and John Haggard, director of orchestras at Mesa Red Mountain High School.

The orchestra received praise for their work in the classroom on musical interpretation, contrasting styles and dynamics. Following their performance, the orchestra enjoyed a 30-minute clinic with Arizona State University Associate Director of Bands Jason Caslor, Ph.D., where they worked on maintaining intensity in their musical performance and bringing out the main musical ideas in their repertoire.

In addition to their performance and clinic, the orchestra was proud to support the Desert Wind Middle School Orchestra in their first ever Fall Festival Performance.

“It was so great to see the huge DWMS orchestra take the stage and to hear these budding musicians perform,” Pour said. “We can’t wait until we see all of them as Maricopa High School Orchestra Rams.”

The orchestra will be performing in the MHS Instrumental Music “Pass in Review Concert” on Dec. 4 along with the MHS Symphonic Band and the MHS Marching Rams. The show begins at 7 p.m. and admission is free.

Submitted photo

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Submitted photo

 

Desert Wind Middle School Orchestra participated for the first time in the ABODA (Arizona Band and Orchestra Director’s Association) Fall Orchestra Festival on Friday.

The event was at Campo Verde High School in Gilbert. Desert Wind Orchestra gave a quality performance and earned praise for their fundamental skills and energy. They received excellent feedback for continuing to develop technique for beginning and intermediate players.

These sixth, seventh and eighth grade students followed their performance with a clinic from Cindy Petty, the artistic director and conductor of the East Valley Youth Symphony, artistic director and conductor of the Oregon Arts Orchestra, and managing director of Concert Productions for Music Celebrations International. The clinic focused on continuing to develop fundamental skills in intonation and styles of bowing.

Roger Wagner, Desert Wind Orchestra director, received direct feedback on what students were doing well and what to continue to focus instruction on.

“Fall Orchestra Festival was a great opportunity for our students to hear other orchestras, perform on a fantastic stage and receive feedback from Arizona’s best string teachers,” Wagner said. “This was also a first for our program. Our students put in a tremendous amount of work to prepare and perform for Festival in Quarter 1.”

In addition to their performance, Desert Wind Orchestra was able to listen to Maricopa High School Chamber Orchestra’s performance.

Orchestra will be joining Tiger Band and Symphonic Band for the Desert Wind Winter Instrumental Music Concert on Thursday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m. in the Maricopa High School Performing Arts Center. The first concert of the year will feature a reprise Orchestra’s music prepared for Fall Festival. Admission is free, but the memories are priceless. Thank you for supporting Desert Wind Performing Arts.

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Submitted photo

For the third year, the Maricopa Wells Middle School Dance Team performed at Arizona Diamondbacks Dance Day on Sept. 23.

“The students danced with excellence and positively represented Maricopa Schools with their performance and with their behavior etiquette,” instructor Yvonne Palm said. “I am so proud of the students on this dance team and their accomplishments in this performance.”

The student also enjoyed the baseball game as the Diamondbacks hosted the Colorado Rockies. The MWMS Dance Team is comprised of 21 members.

By Nancy Smith

Nancy Smith (submitted photo)

The constable for the Justice Court Precinct #4 is an important position for our voters to spend time researching.  In my research I believe Glenn Morrison is the best candidate for the job.

It is important for the elected constable to have qualities of trust, relationship and team building skills, and it’s a plus if the candidate has experience in public law enforcement. Glenn Morrison has all these skills. More importantly, the constable must have skilled experience in conflict resolution and de-escalation. This job can be very challenging, and having these skills and experience will benefit our residents.

Glenn Morrison has 7+ years of experience in dealing with the public in stressful and potential life-altering situations. He has served in the Pinal County Sheriff’s Patrol Posse and he is trained by the Arizona Constables Association. He is trained and ready to serve.

I encourage you to strongly consider supporting Glenn Morrison as Constable for the Justice Court Precinct #4.  I do.


Nancy Smith is a member of the City of Maricopa Council.


Meet the constable candidates

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Stephen F. McCarville, presiding judge of the Superior Court in Pinal County, has appointed two Superior Court Commissioners to fill vacancies created by the gubernatorial appointments of Robert Carter Olson and Patrick Gard to the Pinal County Superior Court bench.

Barbara A. Hazel, a former hospital administrator who currently works as a principal attorney for the Pinal County Public Defender’s Office, was selected for one of the two vacancies left by Olson and Gard earlier this week.

Karen F. Palmer, who currently works for the Pinal County Attorney’s Office as deputy county attorney prosecuting major crimes, was selected to fill the other vacancy.

McCarville thanked McDermott, Kelly Neal and Megan Weagant, who were included in the five candidates identified by the Superior Court’s Judicial Selection Committee to move forward for the judge’s consideration.

Hazel and Palmer are expected to begin their new roles as commissioners Oct. 22.

Photo by Michelle Chance

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Narcotics Anonymous meets at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors After Hours is at 5:30 p.m. at Breez Casuals, 43366 W. Little Drive.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.. at Maricopa Healing Ministry, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Game Night is at 6:30 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Church Rummage Sale is at 7 a.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Movies Under the Stars is at 6 p.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

SUNDAY

Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

State Rep. Vince Leach (left) and Democrat opponent Ralph Atchue at a feisty debate in August, are scheduled to appear in an Oct. 6 InMaricopa.com Town Hall for the General Election. Photo by Angelica Ramis.

 

The InMaricopa.com General Election Town Hall is set for Oct. 6 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Maricopa High School’s Performing Arts Center.

State and local candidates will discuss the issues with their opponents and take questions from the public ahead of the Nov. 6 election. The event is free to attend. RSVP at MaricopaEvents.com.

In a survey of attendees after the Primary Election Town Hall, more than 90 percent said the event affected the way they would vote.

“The opportunity for political candidates to engage with prospective voters about issues the voters care about is a priceless element of our democracy,” InMaricopa Editor Raquel Hendrickson said. “So, we encourage voters and candidates to bring thoughtful discussion points to help highlight the differences between the campaigns.”

The morning block starting at 10 a.m. will have candidates for state house and senate for Legislative District 11. The afternoon block starting at noon will have candidates for Arizona Corporation Commission, constable and more offices.

The rules for candidates and audience alike are simple: Be respectful, be succinct and stay on topic.

The town hall is in partnership with Maricopa High School and Be Awesome Youth Coalition.

Doors open at 9:45 a.m. A LEGO pool supervised by Be Awesome Youth Coalition volunteers will be available for children whose parents wish to attend.

520-568-0040
Raquel@InMaricopa.com, MaricopaEvents.com.

Bernard Schober, The Klute, serves as slam master.

 

The third annual All-Maricopa Poetry Slam is planned for Oct. 6. The Maricopa Arts Council event featuring Maricopa poets of high-school age and older is an artistic competition for performance of original poetry where poets perform their own work before an audience.

A poetry slam is like a series of high-energy, tiny one-person plays, and all types of poetry are welcome onstage, from street-wise hip-hop and narrative performance poems, to political rants and introspective confessionals. Slams can be an intense theatrical experience, and because these are adult slams they are free speech events.

To compete, poets will need three original poems, each lasting no longer than three minutes. No props, costumes nor musical accompaniment are permitted.

Only the first 14 poets who show up at 5:45 p.m. to register will have the chance to perform, and performances will be carved down in each round, from 14 to nine to the final five. The top two poets will be awarded the prize of a spot to perform at the larger All-Arizona Poetry Slam Championship, also held in Maricopa, Feb. 2.

Plus, the two finalists will earn the opportunity to present at the All-Arizona championship slam as sorbet poets, performing a single poem in intermission between the official competition rounds.

The slam master for all MAC performance poetry events is poet Bernard Schober, who writes and performs as The Klute. A veteran of the annual National Slam, author of a dozen poetry collections and recognized worldwide as a shark conservationist, he is well-known throughout the Southwest for fiery, gripping performances of his own poetry.

The All-Maricopa Poetry Slam will return to its roots at Honeycutt Coffee, 44400 W. Honeycutt Road, Suite 109. The event begins at 5:45 p.m., when participants register and audience members can purchase refreshments and mingle. The competition proper will take place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. During the preliminary period, audience members can enjoy a “slam prelude” – on-the-spot art created by Maricopa visual artists. There is a $5 event entrance fee.

MACmaricopa@gmail.com; Facebook.com, search Maricopa Arts Council


This story appears in the September issue of InMaricopa.

 

By Joan Koczor

Older adults need to be extra careful of overheating and heat stroke. As we age, our bodies cannot adjust to high temperatures as well.

Our sense of thirst decreases, which can cause seniors to not realize they are thirsty and face the dangers of dehydration. Common medications, such as those for blood pressure, flush water from the body. Diuretics or low-salt diets could also affect the way your body regulates temperature. Side effects from some medications can cause excessive sweating and diarrhea.

A daily intake of about six 8-ounce glasses of water is about average. Medications you are taking are also a consideration, so talk to your doctor about how much water you should be drinking each day.

A few simple steps can make a difference in how you handle these excessive temperatures.

Schedule a checkup for your home or car air conditioner – make sure both are running properly.

Keep the shades/blinds closed during the hottest part of the day. Eat light, cold meals like salads and chicken.

Drink plenty of cool water throughout the day. A body that is hydrated feels cooler and can regulate temperatures better. Lessen your caffeine intake. Take a cool shower. Put a cold cloth on the back of your neck. Wear loose-fitting clothing. Fans help circulate the air and can make an air-conditioned house feel cooler. Freeze plastic bottles of water, take one with you when you go outside. As the ice melts, you will have a supply of cold water.

Visit a shopping mall, library or coffee shop. Go see a movie.

Drinking enough water every day is one of the smartest, simplest ways to keep the body functioning properly. Be aware of the signs of dehydration – dry mouth/skin, lightheadedness, low blood pressure, rapid heartbeat – and use these tips to keep cool throughout the summer. And don’t forget to take that water bottle wherever you go.

Remember, pets also need to be protected from dehydration and many heat-related illnesses.

Joan Koczor is a senior advocate and member of the Age-Friendly Maricopa Advisory Committee.


This column appears in the September issue of InMaricopa.

By Al Brandenburg

Al Brandenburg

Fall planting can be very productive as temps cool and we get ready to plant cabbage, lettuce, brussels sprouts, escarole, beets and, my favorite, swiss chard.

First things first. Remove all tomato and other plants that have died (peppers, if healthy and getting enough water, will start to produce again as temps cool). Add more humus and plant scraps to your soil and turn it over to loosen it.

Swiss chard reaches a mature height of 1-2 feet and is relatively easy to sow from seed or transplants. You can grow chard anywhere that lettuce and spinach will grow. It can be planted early in the season, as the seedlings are tolerant to frost. Swiss chard likes organic-rich, well-drained soil and plenty of sun. Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young and tender (smaller than 4 inches) or after maturity. Plant swiss chard seeds 2-3 weeks after Labor Day. Sow seed 3 inches apart and thin as necessary. Continue planting seeds at 10-day intervals for a month. Once you have begun your Swiss chard harvest, the plants can be continually harvested through February.

Beets, with earthy sweetness and rich colors, are a delicious addition to your garden. They don’t require much room, and they like cool weather. Plant the seeds 1-2 inches apart in the row. Cover the seeds lightly with loose soil, and then sprinkle it with water. You should see the plants sprouting in seven to 14 days. Thin to assure good bulb growth. You can plant beets in partial shade, but you want their roots to reach a depth of at least 3-6 inches, so don’t plant them under a tree where they might run into tree roots.

Cabbage thrives in cool weather. In most areas, you can plant an early crop for fresh eating and a late crop — usually the more problem-free and tasty of the two — primarily for winter storage. Choose early varieties such as Primax for summer harvest; midseason and late-season cultivars for storage. Mini cabbages such as Gonzales, harvested when only 6 inches in diameter, are perfect for small gardens. Sow seeds indoors, ¼-inch deep and 2 inches apart, around mid-December. Place in a sunny spot or under lights with temperatures between 60 and 70 degrees F, and keep the soil uniformly moist. When daytime temperatures reach 50 degrees and seedlings have three leaves, plant them outdoors. Plant seedlings in the garden slightly deeper than they grew in flats. Space 6-12 inches apart in rows 1- 2 feet apart. Wide spacings produce bigger heads, but young, small cabbages are tastier.

For more in-depth info on how best to choose and plant, go to mac-pinal-mastergardener.org.

So, good luck and good eating. I know I will.

Pinal County Master Gardener Al Brandenburg is a resident of Maricopa.


This column appears in the September issue of InMaricopa.

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Photo by Brady Stamps

Maricopa High School photographer Brady Stamps captured images from the deconstruction/construction of the new dugouts for the baseball field. The project removes and replaces the dugouts on the main field as part of off-season improvements.

Murray Siegel

By Murray Siegel

The school year has started, and many 12th-grade students and their families are experiencing the college admission application process.

If a student waits until the senior year of high school, he or she has waited too long. The process should begin in elementary school where the student can develop a productive work ethic. Completing all homework assignments, studying for tests and starting early on assigned projects and reports will develop behaviors that will maximize grades in high school.

Once the student arrives in ninth grade, a folder should be maintained listing all activities (both in-school and off-campus – athletics, music, academic competitions and student government are prime examples), including a description of the efforts made by the student. A similar folder should be created for each grade level in high school. Colleges are very interested in activities as well as grades. A student who has participated in time-consuming activities and who has good grades has learned to budget time and will most likely be successful in college.

Starting in 11th grade, the student should start examining possible colleges. Some questions that should be asked about each school are:

  1. Is the school’s location what I want? Some students may wish to be close to home while others may want to be far away.
  2. What size student population is desired? Will a student be happy with a campus of 1,000 students? How about 30,000 or 50,000?
  3. Is there an academic program that covers the student’s career interests?
  4. If the student should change his or her mind about the major, are there diverse majors available?
  5. How likely is the student to receive sufficient financial aid?

There is help available, starting with the high school counselor’s office. Ultimately, the student should visit the campus of each school that appears to be a good choice. Ideally, visit the campus on Friday and attend classes. Stay over to Saturday to see what type of activities exist for those residing on campus.

It is wise to invest time in seeking financial aid. There are all types of scholarships. Students who have a parent who served on a U.S. Navy submarine are eligible for a special scholarship, as are those whose parents or grandparents worked in the shoe industry. Many church-based colleges offer financial aid to students who are active members. An excellent scholarship program is the ROTC Scholarship, which pays academic costs and provides a monthly stipend to help with room and board.

Financial-aid research is an important part of early preparations for college.

Murray Siegel has a PhD in MathEd and 42 years of teaching experience. He lives in Maricopa.


This column appears in the September issue of InMaricopa.

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By Chris Cahall

Chris Cahall

HBO’s hit show “Game of Thrones” generates its network a billion dollars annually. One of the better scenes is in season two when Petyr Baelish faces off with Cerci Lannister. He hints at knowing a secret she didn’t want divulged and proclaims, “knowledge is power.” She bests him with her soldiers and shows him she can bring about his demise and tells him “power is power.”

SPOLIER ALERT: Baelish was right. We find out later that the whole war was orchestrated by him, he has been manipulating events to produce kingdom chaos with one goal: to take over. He only loses when another player gains knowledge of his scheme, defeating him and claiming his bannerman as her own because, knowledge is power.

Which brings me to my point. This subtle (yet game-changing) plot point is a universal truth that has taken a niche genre and developed it into a multi-billion-dollar franchise. And it isn’t lost on the players at the Be Awesome Youth Coalition. They have adopted this philosophy and will be focusing on it this fall by educating parents and community members on topics relevant to our youth. Kids and teens are facing a slew of issues, and if we don’t make it a priority to educate ourselves on the realities facing them, then we run the risk of falling into the trap of false security. Here are three ways in the month of September you can get involved with Be Awesome and increase the knowledge (aka power).

1). Swag Bags. Be Awesome is currently using fun swag for decorative bags to share with community members that also provide valuable information for parents and community members about adults. We could use help with collecting items, putting them together, and passing them out at events. Or grab one for your-self.

2). Social Media. Like and share the Facebook Page. Be Awesome will be publishing valuable information on their page alongside of other fun and motivating posts. Take the time to like the page, read the posts, and share them.

3). Talk-O Tuesdays. Be Awesome will be providing speakers and information on tough topics relevant to the health and wellness of kids and teens over a taco dinner with the partnership of Ultra Star. After a long drive home on the 347 you don’t have to decide between making dinner and participating in a workshop with valuable information. Your community has you covered.

www.beawesomeyouth.life
520-428-7750


This column appears in the September issue of InMaricopa.