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An array of activities this week is topped off with the InMaricopa Town Hall, featuring four time blocks of Primary Election debates. For details on these and other listings, or to add your own, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Healing Rooms, 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Red Cross Blood Drive is at 12:45 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

8-Bits is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Primary Election Town Hall starts at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Performing Arts Center, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

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Scott McKee is the challenger to incumbent Amanda Stanford in the Republican Primary for clerk of the Pinal County Superior Court.

The office of clerk of the Pinal County Supreme Court has been a volatile position within the Republican Party and is again heading for a Primary Election battle as a political newcomer takes on the incumbent.

Scott McKee of San Tan Valley is challenging Amanda Stanford of Florence for the GOP nomination. McKee has worked in accounting and financial management most of his career. Stanford was first elected four years ago and had worked in the clerk’s office since 2007.

No other party placed a candidate on the ballot.

Though the office of Clerk of the Superior Court is mostly administrative, she said, political affiliation can play a part because, “legislation, court rules and administrative orders do impact the responsibilities and operations of the office regarding case flow, fees associated with various court filings, and statistical reports to name a few.”

The candidates provided the following information:

Scott McKee
Residence: San Tan Valley
Age: 49
Occupation: Accounting
Family: Married for 24 years, six children age 11-23
Politics: Lifelong Republican; NRA life member, pro-life, advocate for victims’ rights

Why do you want this position?
My purpose for running is to serve as the statesman for the people of Pinal County. The Pinal County Clerk’s office should be managed with fairness, integrity, and efficiency. Our justice system, judges and all citizens of Pinal County deserve a leader they can trust.

Why are you the right person for this job?
My strong leadership, organizational skills and commitment to you the citizens and our judicial system make me a great candidate for Clerk of the Superior Court in Pinal County.


There are no other candidates for the position of clerk of the Superior Court, so the winner of the Republican primary will have no competition in the general election.

Learn more about this race in InMaricopa’s upcoming Election Guide, and question these candidates in person at the InMaricopa Town Hall Aug. 4 – MaricopaEvents.com.

Amanda Stanford
Residence: Florence
Age: 34
Occupation/previous occupations: Town of Florence – Student worker co-op program during high school approximately 2000-2002; Pinal County Clerk of the Superior Court’s Office (2002) – Part-time permanent Deputy Clerk; Town of Florence (2002-2007) – Cashier, Account Clerk, Accountant; Pinal County Clerk of the Superior Court’s Office (2007-2014) – Accountant II, Business Operations Manager; Pinal County Clerk of the Superior Court (2015-Current) – Clerk of the Superior Court
Family: Three children, Logan, 12; Lola, 9; Mitchell, 7
Years in Pinal County: 20

Qualifications:
I am one class away from obtaining my MSA. I have worked in various positions within the Clerk of the Superior Court’s office for approximately 10 years. I have been accredited by the Administrative Office of the Courts to train Minimum Accounting Standards (MAS) within the Pinal County Clerk of the Superior Court’s office as well as the various courts and justice partners throughout Arizona. I am working towards completing the Certified Court Executive Program through the Administrative Office of the Courts. Once that certification is obtained, I plan to apply to participate in the Fellows program through the Institute of Court Management – a nationally accredited court management program.

Why do you want this position? I have had the privilege of serving the people of Pinal County as the Clerk of the Superior Court for the last four years and would love the opportunity to continue to do so. The office has made many strides and has experienced a multitude of accomplishments since my coming into office such as: successful deployment of eFiling services, kiosk check-in for jurors, various training modules for continued staff development, and many more.

What do you want to change about the office of the Clerk of the Superior Court?
This is an interesting question. The word “change” can sometimes have such a negative connotation to it. That being said, I don’t want to “change” anything within the Clerk of the Superior Court’s office. I want to continue to make “improvements” in all areas and aspects within the office of the Clerk. Staff development is very important to me. By involving my team of about 90 employees in various projects within the office, together, we have significantly reduced waste, continue to analyze and streamline processes, and put measures and goals into place to ensure that resources are being used appropriately and efficiently for the various services the Clerk of the Superior Court’s office provides. Currently, we are working towards making as many functions as electronic as possible. With the various improvements that have been made thus far, we have realized millions of dollars in savings within our various budgets. I have given back to Pinal County $1.6M dollars, saved from my Special Revenue Funds to help supplement the Pinal County General Fund. Fiscal stewardship and effective case flow management ultimately reduce costs, which in turn, reduces the need for tax increases or the need to cut any of the other various important Pinal County programs.

Why are you the right person for this job?
I believe in this office and what it represents. I have only ever worked for the government. I truly have the heart of a public servant. I bring my education and 10 years of experience specifically related to the Clerk of the Superior Court’s office. I would love to have the honor to continue to serve the wonderful citizens of Pinal County.

 

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Pinal County Recorder Virginia Ross is reminding voters and potential voters that the midterm election will be soon upon us.

“Time is running out to register to vote,” Ross stated. “It’s important that if you have any questions about if you are registered or not, to give our Citizen Contact Center a call at (520) 509-3555 or by cell at 3-1-1.” Or check the status of your registration at Voter View https://voter.azsos.gov/VoterView/RegistrantSearch.do

If you would like to register to vote, you can find a voter registration form at most city, county and state offices or libraries. The Recorder’s Office will mail you a form if you call and request it at 520-509-3555. You can also go online to the EZ Voter Registration page https://servicearizona.com/webapp/evoter to complete a form electronically.

If you would like to be on the Permanent Early Voting List (PEVL), you can go to: http://www.pinalcountyaz.gov/Recorder/Pages/PermanentEarlyVotingRegistration.aspx and download a request. You can also fill one out at the Pinal County Voter Registration Office in Florence or at either Pinal County Recorder’s Office satellite locations in Casa Grande and Apache Junction.

Important dates for Upcoming Elections

Primary Election
July 14, Military & Overseas Registered Voters ballots are mailed
July 30, Last Day to Register to Vote
Aug. 1, Early ballots are mailed to the Permanent Early Voting List (PEVL) & absentee voters; early in-person voting begins at the three Recorder’s Office locations
Aug. 28, Primary Election

General Election
Sept. 22, Military & Overseas Registered Voters ballots are mailed
Oct. 9, Last Day to Register to Vote
Oct. 10, Early ballots are mailed to the Permanent Early Voting List (PEVL) & absentee voters; early in-person voting begins at the three Recorder’s Office locations
Nov. 6, Primary Election

Offices on the ballot for the Primary Election
Voters will receive a ballot according to political party affiliation (Republican, Democrat, Green or Libertarian), Independents choose which ballot and may select “Nonpartisan” which will have only city/town contests.
• Federal offices: U.S. Senate and U.S. Representative for Congressional Districts 1, 3, and 4
• Statewide offices: Governor, Secretary of State, Attorney General, State Treasurer, Superintendent of Public Instruction, State Mine Inspector, Corporation Commissioner
• Legislative offices: State Senate (one seat) and House (two seats) for Legislative Districts 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, and 16
• County offices: Clerk of the Superior Court, Justices of the Peace, Constables, Precinct Committee Persons (partisan only)
• Cities/Towns: Primary election for city/town council members and mayor. Runoff in November, only if necessary.
• Special Taxing Districts: There may be some that participate in the primary, but most will be on the November ballot.

Offices on the ballot for the General Election
All voters will receive the same ballot for a given precinct part – all candidates from all parties that won in the primary are listed.
Same offices as discussed for the primary, except cities/towns may not be included if they don’t need runoff elections.
Additional contests:
• County, city/town, school district, special taxing district ballot measures
• School district and special taxing district governing board candidates
• Retention of judges (Arizona Supreme Court, Arizona Court of Appeals and Superior Court)
• Statewide ballot measures

Candidates
If you are interested in who has qualified for the Primary Election, you can click on the following link: http://www.pinalcountyaz.gov/elections/Documents/UpcomingElections/PrimaryCandidates.pdf

#InMaricopaTownHall

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The owner/s of two dogs without collars found in Homestead are being sought.

The dogs, one male and one female, were found Monday at 8:30 a.m. A veterinarian confirmed they are not microchipped. The dogs appear healthy and well cared for.

Contact Cody at 520-252-2210

MONDAY

School begins for Maricopa Unified School District, Sequoia Pathway and Legacy Traditional.

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood meets at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Grief Journey is at 2 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

MUSD Board Meeting is at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Unified School District, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Color Me Calm is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Glennwilde Open House for Agents & Brokers is at noon at DR Horton Glennwilde, 18501 N. Crestview Lane.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

PowerPack Copa Packing Party is at 4:30 p.m. at The Villages Community Center, 20991 N. Butterfield Parkway.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Multigenerational Game Night is at 6:30 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, Multipurpose Room A, 45345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Former Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman, Derek Kennard will host a USA Football FUNdamentals clinic for children ages 7-18 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.  July 21 at Copper Sky Regional Park.

The free event is designed to introduce children to football by teaching basic skills in an exciting and energetic environment and is supported through a grant from the NFL Foundation.

FUNdamentals incorporates a series of drills to teach passing, catching and running skills in a non-contact setting. All skills and drills selected are based on USA Football’s Player Progression Development Model, ensuring children are learning in an age-appropriate manner, based on their cognitive and physical maturity.

USA Football is the sport’s national governing body and is a member of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

Registration starts at 7 a.m. Online registration is available at www.usafootball.com/fun.

Kennard started his pro career in 1984 with the Los Angeles Express of the USFL. In 1986 he landed with the St. Louis Cardinals. He was traded to the New Orleans Saints in 1991. He signed as an unrestricted free agent with the Dallas Cowboy in 1994. With the Cowboys, he played center in Super Bowl XXX, which the Cowboys won over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

More information

By Joan Koczor 

Initially, your primary care provider will be the first step in diagnosing many health issues. He will recommend screening, help you manage chronic conditions and, if needed, refer you to other types of providers or specialists.

A short list of specialists may include cardiologists, oncologists, allergists, psychologists, podiatrists and orthopedists.

Through all this, your life has changed – you’ve become a patient.

Your days are no longer ordinary. There are examinations, medications, diagnosis and treatment options, doctor appointments, hospital stays, decisions to make, endless paperwork, phone calls to health insurers. Who can you turn to in time of an emergency?

Dealing with any illness can be a very stressful time for patients and their families.

Add to that the health care system has become so confusing – think walking through a maze – that some patients may need someone to help them navigate.

A new trend is enlisting a patient advocate.

An advocate may be a member of your family or a close friend. An effective advocate is someone you trust and will act on your behalf as well as work with other members of your health care team.

Another type of advocate is a professional advocate. Hospitals usually have professionals who play this role called patient representatives or patient advocates. Social workers or nurses may also fill this role.

In choosing a patient advocate, it is important to decide what you want help with and what you can handle without assistance.

Do you need a better understanding of options for hospitals, doctors, diagnostic tests? Assurance your wishes are carried out if there comes a time you might not be able to do that yourself? Would you like your advocate to accompany you to tests, appointments, treatments and procedures? Assist you in wading through the never-ending medical bills? Become your representative to health care providers?

It is important to let your physician and those caring for you know who your advocate is and how much involvement they have in your care. Make sure your doctors and nurses have your advocate’s contact information. And the same for your advocate – provide them with numbers for your health care provider, hospital and pharmacy and anyone you wish contacted in case of an emergency.

Not all advocates charge a fee. Not all who do will charge for their services in exactly the same way. The cost may depend on:

  • your location, or your location in relation to where they are located.
  • the advocate’s experience and education.
  • the amount of time you work together.

Additional factors like necessary travel, acquisition of medical records, or others may cause the price to fluctuate.

PatientAdvocate.org, AdvoConnection.com/advocatelocations/arizona

Joan Koczor is a senior advocate and member of the Age-Friendly Maricopa Advisory Committee.


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa Magazine.

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Sponsored content

Aaron Gilbert. Photo by William Lange

By Aaron Gilbert

When life’s already busy, here’s how you can make time to eat better and move more often.

Ask yourself why

Understand exactly why you want to eat better and exercise more gives you the motivation to prioritize it over other things.

Examples:

Q: Why do I want to eat healthier and exercise more?
A: Because I want to fit in smaller pants.

Q: But why do I want to fit in smaller pants?
A: Because when I’m wearing smaller pants, I look better.

Q: But why do I want to look better?
A: Because when I look good, I feel good about myself.

Q: But why do I want to feel good about myself?
A: Because when I feel good about myself, I’m more assertive and confident.

Q: But why do I want to be more assertive and confident?
A: Because when I’m more assertive and confident, I’m in control, my fears won’t stop me, and I can finally go for my dreams.

Identify your top priorities

Think of your time as a jar, which you can fill with a finite number of rocks, pebbles and sand.

Your big rocks represent the stuff that’s most necessary to feel fulfilled in life. They often relate to family, health, and livelihood. Your pebbles add extra fun and satisfaction to life, but aren’t totally necessary. You sand is purely “bonus” activity. It can be enjoyable, but it’s not crucial to your survival or fulfillment

Everyone’s rocks, pebbles and sand will look different. But regardless, if you fill you jar with too much sand first, the rocks and pebbles won’t fit.

Keep a time diary

Your schedule reflects how you’re prioritizing the activities in your life. Track your time in 15-minute increments for a couple weeks to find out if it’s consistent with your goals and values. For example:

7:00-7:15 – Woke up, brushed teeth
7:15-7:30 – Checked Instagram
7:30-7:45 – Still on Instagram

Then analyze it:

Actual
Work 35%
Sleep 20%
Exercise 2%
Time with loved ones 10%
Watching TV 10%
Surfing the Internet 25%
Healthy meal prep 3%

Desired
Work 35%
Sleep 30%
Exercise 5%
Time with loved ones 20%
Watching TV/Internet 2.5%
Time in nature 2.5%
Healthy meal prep 5%

To start to align your schedule with what you want to accomplish, replace low-value activities with high-value ones, little by little.

Aaron Gilbert, CSCS, owns Longevity Athletics and can be reached at 520-261-4661 and Aaron@LongevityAthletics.com.


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa Magazine.

Senior residents and winter visitors learn a thing or two at MAC's AgVenture Tours.

By Rita Bricker 

Rita Bricker

Let’s explore the Master Gardener program as it relates to our fair city of Maricopa.

But first some history and definitions. The Land Grant College Act of 1862 ceded land within each state to establish colleges and universities specializing in the “agricultural and mechanic” (A&M) arts. The University of Arizona is our land-grant college.

The Cooperative Extension Service is a large, informal education system to help people use research-based knowledge to improve their lives. This service is provided by a state’s land-grant university and is administered by county agents. Our Pinal County agent is Rick Gibson.

The Master Gardener program is an adjunct of the Cooperative Extension Service along with other groups such as 4-H. Our mission as Master Gardeners is to provide the public with research-based, home, horticultural information through educational programs and projects. We are all unpaid volunteers.

Our local group is fortunate to have the Maricopa Agricultural Center (affectionately known as MAC) as our home base. The MAC is a University of Arizona experiment station known for its research on cotton, small grains, alfalfa and new, specialty crops. At the MAC, our Master Gardeners maintain a demonstration garden, and we are currently planning a new orchard plot. We utilize these areas as teaching platforms to introduce local homeowners to new plants and planting techniques, as well as best practices in planning, cultivation, irrigation, and garden and tool maintenance.

Another vital service we provide is plant diagnostics. The Maricopa Master Gardeners were commissioned by our county extension agent to act as the go-to plant and insect diagnostic resource for the county in January 2014. In that capacity, we assumed responsibility for logging and resolving the plant and insect questions and issues tendered by home gardeners from all corners of Pinal County. We have a diagnostic lab and comprehensive library in our office, which is also located at the MAC.

Becoming a Pinal County Master Gardener requires some time and dedication, but it’s well worth it, not only for one’s personal knowledge but for the opportunity to share that learning with others. First, one must complete a specialized course in gardening in the low desert. The 50-hour course covers topics such as botany, soils and plant nutrition, problem diagnosis, irrigation, pest management, desert-adapted plants and vegetable gardening.

The next Garden and Landscape course will be offered in Maricopa Aug. 22–Dec.19. 

Upon course completion, Master Gardener applicants must complete a specified number of volunteer service hours to obtain full certification. Typical volunteer projects include our annual plant sale, introducing school children to outdoor gardening, staffing the plant diagnostic office, and presenting information at city-wide events. These volunteer opportunities are fun and gratifying, and they can open up a whole new network of acquaintances and contacts.

Rita Bricker is a Master Gardener in Maricopa.

520-374-6263
MACmastergardener@gmail.com


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa Magazine.

Linette Caroselli (Sunshine and Reign Photography)

By Linette Y. Caroselli

Never in a million years did I think I would ever become a teacher. My dream was to be the next Barbara Walters. I always had a passion for journalism. I would watch the evening news and tell myself one day, I would be on TV. Well, life had other plans.

I graduated from Bloomfield College with a B.A. in English Communications in 1996, a year late. I had a little baby girl. Walking across that stage to get my degree was a huge accomplishment because people told me I wouldn’t be able to finish. Shortly, a chance meeting at a BBQ would change my life forever.

There were five teachers from Newark, New Jersey, in attendance. We began talking about education specifically writing because after all I was going to be the next Barbara Walters. They told me that wasn’t my calling. Teaching kids Language Arts was. The look on my face must have been comical. Me, a teacher?

I was told it was the perfect job given my situation as a young mother. I went to the East Orange Board of Education and applied for a substitute position to give it a try. The lady taking my information saw my hesitation and said, “Don’t worry. The kids will let you know the first day if this is the job for you or not.” She was right.

That day turned into a year. That year turned into 21 years. I have never looked back.

Teaching to me is one of the greatest blessings in my life! I have had the opportunity to positively impact the lives of over 1700 children from all walks of life. I have inspired, motivated, guided, fed, clothed, mentored and most importantly developed future adults into productive individuals. I am so very proud to be in this profession that makes all others possible. I knew I would never get rich doing this but the rewards are priceless. I am more than a teacher; I am a mentor, a confidant, a 2nd mom, and a role model.

As I move into the next venture of my life as a possible city council member, my role as a teacher will play a vital role in the decisions I make. The impact of my decisions is carefully considered because they affect lives. I will now have the opportunity to positively impact an entire city.

 

Linette Caroselli is an eighth grade ELA teacher at Desert Wind Middle School and a candidate for City Council.

Opportunities to get oriented for the new school year, big steps in business development and important community meetings are part of this week’s activities in Maricopa. See details and more events, or add your own, at InMaricopa.com.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Age-Friendly Maricopa Advisory Committee meets at 4 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Healthy Living with Chronic Pain Workshop is at 9:30 a.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Board of Adjustment Hearing is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

City Council Work Session is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

City Council Regular Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood is at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Grief Journey is at 2 p.m. Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Meet the Teacher at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Wells Middle School, 45725 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Blue Star Mothers of Maricopa monthly meeting is at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Veterans Center, 44240 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

THURSDAY

Freshman First Day is at 8 a.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Color Me Calm at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Business Groundbreaking is at 9:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Commerce Center, 12501 N. Murphy Road.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Family Story Time s at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Meet the Teacher Night is at 5 p.m. at Sequoia Pathway Academy, 19287 N Porter Road.

Meet the Teacher at 5 p.m. at Santa Rosa Elementary School, 21400 N Santa Rosa Drive.

Ram Academy Orientation is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Maricopa High School Open House is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Meet the Teacher at 6 p.m. at Saddleback Elementary School, 18600 N. Porter Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

8-Bits is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Business Grand Opening is at 9 a.m. at Ross Dress For Less, 20595 N. John Wayne Parkway.

Annual Youth Football Camp is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

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Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

Magician Kaden Kruz brought his own brand of up-close magic to Maricopa Public Library again to close out this season of the Summer Reading Season on Thursday. An incoming freshman at Maricopa High School in real life, Kaden auditioned for “America’s Got Talent” last season and received two call-backs, and may audition again. He has more than 50 performances under his belt. He told his audience of young readers he learned most of his act from books on magic.

MPD officers discuss a car described as stolen from Tempe. Photo by Mason Callejas

Maricopa Police Department took a man into custody after stopping a vehicle on Honeycutt Road in the Heritage District around 5 p.m. Friday. Area law enforcement agencies were on the lookout for a stolen rental car reported by the Tempe Police Department. MPD spotted a vehicle matching the description and pulled it over after it exited Pershing Street in a high-risk stop. Officers initially had guns drawn. The male driver was taken into custody without incident, according to MPD.

VW employees celebrate their meal-packing effort Tuesday. Submitted photo

The Maricopa location of Volkswagen Group of America was among six sites in the nation with employees packing meals for children Tuesday. The effort was a partnership with the nonprofit Generosity feeds. Given a goal of 35,000 meals, the volunteers totaled 37,200. Generosity Feeds spokesman Brian Bowman said the organization was “over the moon” with the results. The meals go to local schools and food pantries for distribution.

Click on photos to enlarge:

A header of dust travels west at 30 mph south of Maricopa before the larger collection hits the city. Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

The National Weather Service in Phoenix has issued a dust storm warning for Pinal County on Tuesday.

A wall of dust was along the line extending 10 miles south of Maricopa, moving west at 30 mph. Hazard warnings, according to Doppler radar, include less than a quarter-mile of visibility with strong winds at least 40 mph. These hazards could lead to dangerous, life-threatening travel.

National Weather Service warns, “dust storms lead to dangerous driving conditions with visibility reduced to near zero. If driving, avoid dust storms if possible. If caught in one, pull off the road, turn off your lights and keep your foot off the brake.” The dust storm warning will last until 5 p.m.

Panoramic photo by Michelle Chance

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Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

The least expensive home sold in the city of Maricopa from May 16 to June 15 was a manufactured home in the Heritage District. Maricopa’s mixed-use heritage overlay was used a selling point, as homes within the overlay can be used as residential or commercial. The home was in the middle of an 8,000-square-foot lot.

  1. 45004 W. Garvey Ave.

Sold: June 9
Purchase price: $132,250
Square footage: 1,284
Price per square foot: $102.99
Days on market: 95
Builder: unknown
Year built: 1998
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 2
Community: Maricopa Manor
Features: Large lot, remodeled kitchen, new paint inside
Listing agent: Manuel Gauna, My Home Group Real Estate
Selling agent: R.C. Hard, Go Sold Realty

  1. 19220 N. Toledo Ave., Tortosa …………………….. $142,100
  2. 44823 W. Applegate Road, Alterra South ……… $152,000
  3. 46166 W. Sheridan Road, Maricopa Meadows . $153,000
  4. 36536 W. San Clemente St., Tortosa ………….…. $155,000
  5. 18883 N. Miller Way, Maricopa Meadows ….…. $155,000

    This item appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

Clowning, magic, public meetings, a charity event and a political debate are all part of the activities in Maricopa this week. For details on these events, or to add your own, visit InMaricopa.com/Calendar.

MONDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Senior Bowling is at 10 a.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Lovely Buttons performs at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

P&Z Commission Meeting is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Parents of Addicted Loved Ones (PAL) meet at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Behavioral Health Services, 21300 N. John Wayne Parkway, Suite 103.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 7 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

TUESDAY

A meal-packing event for Generosity feeds is at Volkswagen Group of America, 17169 N. Murphy Road.

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Healthy Living with Chronic Pain Workshop is at 9:30 a.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

WEDNESDAY

Creative Sisterhood is at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Babytime is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Grief Journey is at 2 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

S.M.A.R.T. Kids meet at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Sound FX is at 3:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Be Awesome Youth Coalition Monthly Meeting is at 5:15 p.m. at Maricopa Elementary School, 18150 N. Alterra Parkway.

NABI Night Meet-and-Greet Party is 5:30-10 p.m. at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

MUSD Board Meeting is at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Unified School District, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

THURSDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Seniors play Farkel at 9 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Color Me Calm is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Seniors play Canasta at 1 p.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Magic with Kaden is at 3 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Family Story Time is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Healing Rooms are at 6:30 p.m. at 19997 N. Justin Drive.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Seniors play Pinochle at 8:30 a.m. at Santa Cruz Elementary School, 19845 N. Costa del Sol Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Rotary City Council Debate is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa Unified School District, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Volunteers with Generosity Feeds pack meals in Ashburn, Virginia, in June. The organization comes to VWGoA in Maricopa on Tuesday. Submitted photo

Volkswagen’s Maricopa location will be among six sites where employees will team up with volunteers from Generosity Feeds to create 35,000 meals for schoolchildren Tuesday.

“We are thrilled to work with Generosity Feeds to pack meals for those in need as part of our Volkswagen Group of America Get Involved Summer of Service,” said Machelle Williams, senior director of Diversity & CSR for VWGoA.

The Get Involved push started with a Get Involved Week in 2015 that grew into a Get Involved Month in 2016. The inaugural Get Involved Summer was 2017, when 450 employees volunteered 1,400 hours of community service. That included assembling 5,000 meals with the nonprofit organization Generosity Feeds.

“What is so important about Generosity Feeds is that the meals our employees pack go directly to schools and food pantries in the immediate community to support local families. It’s rewarding knowing that our efforts will directly help those in need in our own VWGoA communities across the country,” Williams said.

Generosity Feeds is based in Williamsburg, Virginia.

“We are so grateful to our friends at Volkswagen for partnering with us in this nationwide effort,” said Ron Klabunde, founder and CEO of Generosity Feeds. “Employees from these six sites share an incredible amount of talent and heart. Together, they’ll make a significant, positive difference in every community they touch this summer.”

Besides the Maricopa location on Murphy Road, participating Volkswagen sites are in Belmont, California; Fort Worth, Texas; Herndon, Virginia; Hillsboro, Oregon; and Libertyville, Illinois.

The meals packed in July will be distributed to local children through schools and food pantries.

“A culinary chef created these meals to be nutritious, satisfying and delicious, with sustainable sources of protein and fiber,” said Klabunde. “We’ve come up with a formula that assembles and distributes these meals quickly and efficiently.”

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F.O.R. Maricopa dispersed backpacks and school supplies to qualifying, school-aged children Saturday with help from volunteers of all ages and Maricopa Police Department. The nearly 800 backpacks were part of a community drive to get all students ready for school. The next backpack giveaway will be by The Streets Don’t Love You Back, on July 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Maricopa Wells Middle School’s gym. 

 

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Sponsored content

Homestead construction

By Dayv Morgan

Dayv Morgan

 Maricopa has seen a recent surge in new home construction. Many people find it enjoyable to tour model homes, and soon find themselves contemplating an upgrade to a brand-new house. If you’re looking, perhaps it’s time to contact a Realtor.

Commonly, people believe there is a financial penalty to using a Realtor when buying a new home. That is not the case. It’s cost-free to use your own agent. The commission is paid by the builder. Also, it’s wise to take your Realtor along when you begin looking at models, because typically a builder will not allow you to have an agent once you have completed a registration form.

The seller will not give a lower base price simply because a buyer purchases without an agent. Often with completed spec homes, the opposite is true. Your Realtor can research how long a home has been on the market and help negotiate a reduced price or additional upgrades, such as appliances or landscape packages.

Another misconception is that it’s not necessary to have a Realtor when you buy a brand-new home. Here, it’s important to keep in mind the sales agents at the model homes are employees for the builder. They represent the builder’s best interests, not the buyer’s. A local agent can help point out things about the community, its location, and details such as HOA fees, amenities offered, the home’s orientation and exposure to the sun or proximity to the train tracks, road noise, etc.

Your Realtor may recommend you have a licensed home inspector view the home before closing; another practice that occurs with resales but is often overlooked with new homes.

When I moved to Maricopa in 2006, it was a housing boom and a strong seller’s market. When I decided to buy a new home, I was at the mercy of the builder, and had to agree to all their terms. Waiving a home inspection was one of the requirements. The sales representative convinced me, because the home came with a builder’s warranty, everything would be fine. Twelve months later, the builder was bankrupt, corporate offices were closed, and any possibility of making a warranty claim was gone.

Fortunately, the house had no structural issues. I have heard many examples, however, of home inspectors finding major problems such as missing insulation in walls or attic, disconnected AC ducts, or missing roof tiles. Even national builders and licensed contractors can make mistakes. It is important not to assume everything will be done perfectly. Anything that was installed incorrectly, if not caught during the warranty period, could end up costing hundreds or thousands of dollars when you plan to sell. The average home inspection costs about $350. It is certainly worth the peace of mind to have it done.

 

Dayv Morgan is a Maricopa Realtor and owner of HomeSmart Success. He can be reached at DayvMorgan@gmail.com.

 

 

ADOT photo

Blowing dust forced the closure of State Route 347 in both directions at milepost 184 south of Riggs Road near Maricopa, according to the Arizona Department of Transportation.

There is no estimated reopening time.

Dust blowing from several directions has impacted traffic in town and on SR 347.

The dust also forced the closure of Interstate 10 in both directions at milepost 219 near Picacho.

Southbound Riggs Road has closed as dust plows through. ADOT photo

Laura Logan will be the coach of Maricopa High School's new swim team. Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

By Joycelyn Cabrera

A coach has been confirmed for the newly introduced Maricopa High School swim team, and she’s an award-winner.

Laura Logan, 49, plans to share her experience and training with MHS swimmers.

Logan began swimming at the age of 10, competing in her hometown of Springfield, Illinois, for the next eight years. She qualified to compete in Swimming Junior Nationals in high school, taking her to Orlando, Florida, and earned a full-ride athletic scholarship to Northern Illinois University.

Logan moved to Arizona and in 2004 started Arizona Seals Swimming Academy at Central Arizona College.

“I started the Seals because we moved to Casa Grande, and they don’t have anything,” Logan said.

Her son was one of the biggest reasons for starting a swim team, giving him options to continue after he had been swimming for teams in Illinois.

Logan took over as a high school swim coach in Casa Grande from 2007 to 2015, using the pool at the CAC campus. The school qualified swimmers for state competitions under Logan’s coaching. She trained state-champion swimmers within three years. Logan was also voted “Men’s D2 Coach of the Year” for AIA Swimming.

“I think my greatest success as a coach was when a young man came out his freshman year to swim on the high school swim team, and he shows up, and he does not put his face in the water,” she said. “He puts the biggest sour-puss face you’ve ever seen a kid do. His senior year, he was the freestyle anchor on all the relays and was part of the group that I took to state. We finished fourth.”

The school program came to an end with the closing of the CAC pool. Logan moved Arizona Seals to Copper Sky as a club team no longer affiliated with a school.

Three years later, Maricopa High School, in conjunction with Copper Sky, is introducing a Rams swim team. Logan anticipates 25-30 students for tryouts.

Sophomore Olivia Byers has already trained with Laura Logan for three years. Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

“I’m so excited,” said MHS sophomore Olivia Byers, who has been coached by Logan for three years. “I’m really interested to see who’s going to come out for the team.”

Freshman Connor Schrader has also been a Seal for three years. A multi-sport athlete who doesn’t like “the feeling of sitting around not doing anything,” he’s looking forward to the formation of the high school team.

Connor Schrader comes to the high school team as a freshman. Photo by
Raquel Hendrickson

“It will be a big advantage on the club team,” he said.

While Logan will not have another role at MUSD, her primary focus on the swim team allows her to be limitless in terms of how many students can make the team.

“I never turn anyone away; I’ll work with anybody,” she said.

Logan’s biggest goal in her new position is to teach her athletes lessons through the sport itself, including being goal-oriented.

Logan spends the summer with Arizona Seals Swim Academy and teaches several classes at the Copper Sky pools.

For Olivia, being a swim team member is not just about laps in a pool. “The team is kind of like a family.”

Laura.Logan86@gmail.com


This story appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

Sponsored Content

By Andrew H. Jones
Community Relations Coordinator, Sun Life Family Health Center

Summer break is upon us and in the age of cell phones and video games, it isn’t hard for kids to find something to do on a hot summer day. However, spending too much time with a phone or video game remote control in hand isn’t ideal for anyone, especially when there is plenty of good old-fashioned fun to be had. Here are a few fun and safe activities for children of all ages, to keep them free from boredom and turn a boring day into an amazing fun day.

1. Make a Family Flag — Cut a large rectangle from an old white sheet or pillowcase. Use markers and/or paint to make your own family flag.

2. Make a Puppet Theater — Turn a card table on its side or us a large cardboard box. Make your own paper bag or sock puppets, or simply use dolls and stuffed animals.

3. Paint Rocks — Find rocks and paint funny replicas of your family. Make sure to add googly eyes.

4. Play Tabletop Soccer — Pick teams and have teams sit at opposite ends of a table. Use a ping-pong ball for the soccer ball. Players move the ball by blowing it. To score a goal, a player must blow the ball off the opponent’s edge of the table.

5. Indoor Campout — Hang sheets or blankets over tables or chairs. Let children hangout, snack, and nap in the “tent.”

6. Measure Things — How tall are you? How long is the table? How big around is the tree? How wide is the sidewalk? Give your child a tape measure and work together to find out.

7. Make Paper Airplanes — Look up instructions online on how to make different types. Fold some paper airplanes and hold a contest to see which flies the farthest or stays afloat the longest.

8. Neighborhood Watch — Using old boxes, build a giant robot to protect the neighborhood from “Aliens from Outer Space.”

9. Bowling — Maybe it’s the simple nature of the sport and the obvious lack of tension in the building that puts everyone at ease. Laugh at the gutter balls, and cheer for each other’s strikes.

10. Water Balloon Baseball — My favorite, and even teens will have trouble resisting this silly task of trying to hit a wobbly water balloon with a bat. Your yard will be littered with broken balloon pieces afterward, so entice clean up by offering an ice cream treat to each kid who helps out.

11. Play a Classic Card or Board Game — Playing cards is not only fun, it is a great way to keep kids thinking. A few of my kid’s favorites include; war, slap jack, 21, Rummikub, Monopoly, Catch Phrase, or even pull out the old school domino set.

12. Cook Off or Bake Competition — Anything involving food are always a hit with kids. Putting together a lunch or dinner is also a great way to practice teamwork. Better yet, try a food-tasting contest and have Mom or Dad choose the best tasting dish without knowing whose is whose. Loser does the dishes.

13. Library Story Time — Check with your local library for fun activities, they typically do several for each age group and you can find the ones that are of interest to your child.
14. Movie Marathon — Select a movie series to watch. A few suggestions that my kids love are, the Avengers, Batman, or the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Get everyone’s favorite ice cream and/or make popcorn. Make it a special event (Tip: check your local library for movie rentals).

15. Volunteer Work — Whether it’s helping at a food bank, or the public library, volunteers are always in need. It is important your children learn that the world really does not revolve around playing video games or silly apps on their phone. There are plenty of fun and rewarding opportunities to volunteer your time. Working side by side with your teen that involves sacrifice for the benefit of another will provide work experience, making new friends, and fun!

Take advantage of summer break and have fun spending quality time with your children. Let your children decide what they would like to do as an activity. You may learn something new about them, and possibly even yourself. Let them take control and participate with enthusiasm! If you can create an experience that includes just one of these activities you will be off and running to fun filled moments and creating memories.

Sun Life Family Health Center wishes you and your family a fun, safe and healthy summer break. To learn more about our office locations and hours, visit www.sunlifefamilyhealth.org.

REFERENCES
1. Lauren Piro. (2017). 40 Boredom-Busting Activities to Do With the Kids. Retrieved from www.goodhousekeeping. com/home/craft-ideas/how-to/g1389/diy-kids-activities/?slide=24
2. The Myria Editors. (2017). 33 fun summer activities for kids and families. Retrieved from https://myria.com/33-fun-summer-activities-for-kids-and-families
3. Woman’s Day Staff. (2018). Fun Summer Activities That Won’t Break the Bank. Retrieved from www.womansday.com/life/work-money/tips/g1212/summer-activities/?slide=2

TIP OF THE MONTH
Children have a lot of energy to release, be active with them! #OneSmallChange

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The sun will be baking this weekend.

Thursday is predicted to be the hottest day of the year, to be followed by a scorching, humid weekend. But a semblance of “monsoon” weather behavior may be on the horizon.

Today will be sunny with temperatures expected to hit 114 degrees F. Get safety tips for the excessive heat warning. There will be little letup overnight as the low will be 92 under partly cloudy skies, though a 15 mph breeze could gust to 20 mph.

Friday, too, will likely be sunny and hot, with the high reaching 113. Winds are expected to increase to 20 mph, bringing gusts of 30 mph. The night will be partly cloudy with a low around 85.

Saturday is forecast to be sunny and hot with a high near 112 and light winds. Overnight, there will be partly cloudy skies with a low of 85 and a 10-percent chance of showers.

Sunday comes with a 10 percent chance of showers in the afternoon and a high near 111. The chance of rain increases to 30 percent overnight, with the low around 82 and calm winds.

The triple digits continue into next week, as do the daily chances of rain or thunderstorms.

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Thousands of Maricopans were at Copper Sky – or just outside of the park – to watch the Fourth of July fireworks display Wednesday night. Inside the park there was entertainment, kids’ games and vendors. Nearby, Ak-Chin Indian Community also fired off fireworks that were also easily seen from Copper Sky. The City of Maricopa produces the Great American 4th annually.

The American Legion hosted its annual softball game against city staff, elected officials and community members the morning of the Fourth of July at Copper Sky. Just for fun, the game included Legion baseball players, police and fire officials and current and former mayors while giving the Be Awesome Coalition a spotlight.

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In Congress, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,
When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.–Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.

He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers.

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance.

He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures.

He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power.

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:

For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:

For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury:

For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies:

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments:

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation.

He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our Brittish brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.

We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

Georgia
Button Gwinnett
Lyman Hall
George Walton

North Carolina
William Hooper
Joseph Hewes
John Penn

South Carolina
Edward Rutledge
Thomas Heyward, Jr.
Thomas Lynch, Jr.
Arthur Middleton

Massachusetts
John Hancock

Maryland
Samuel Chase
William Paca
Thomas Stone
Charles Carroll of Carrollton

Virginia
George Wythe
Richard Henry Lee
Thomas Jefferson
Benjamin Harrison
Thomas Nelson, Jr.
Francis Lightfoot Lee
Carter Braxton

Pennsylvania
Robert Morris
Benjamin Rush
Benjamin Franklin
John Morton
George Clymer
James Smith
George Taylor
James Wilson
George Ross

Delaware
Caesar Rodney
George Read
Thomas McKean

New York
William Floyd
Philip Livingston
Francis Lewis
Lewis Morris

New Jersey

Richard Stockton
John Witherspoon
Francis Hopkinson
John Hart
Abraham Clark

New Hampshire
Josiah Bartlett
William Whipple

Massachusetts
Samuel Adams
John Adams
Robert Treat Paine
Elbridge Gerry

Rhode Island
Stephen Hopkins
William Ellery

Connecticut
Roger Sherman
Samuel Huntington
William Williams
Oliver Wolcott

New Hampshire
Matthew Thornton