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InMaricopa

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Photo by Penelope Cooper

The trailer of a semi-truck rig caught fire just south of Riggs Road on State Route 347 Thursday morning.

Though the rig itself did not initially block southbound traffic, law enforcement re-routed cars to eastbound Riggs Road in order for Gila River Fire Department and Sun Lakes Fire Department to respond to the scene and extinguish the blaze.

The contents of the trailer were destroyed.

Photo by Penelope Cooper

Chrystal Allen-O'Jon

Chrystal Allen-O’Jon is planning the second Maricopa Music Fest, set for April.

 

Hometown: Los Angeles, California

Maricopan since: 2011

Occupation: Music & Arts , emphasis in Entertainment Marketing – supposedly retired

Family: Husband: Kent O’Jon retired this year after 32 years in three branches of the U.S. Military; 3 adults sons in California and one in Texas and one grandson

Pets: Fritz, a 5-year-old service German shepherd, Lupita, a 3-year-old grey Multipoo, and Sasha, a young cat

Cars: BMW, Mercedes and SUV….want an electric Tesla

Hobbies: Music, movies, swimming, crafts and now gardening

Pet peeve: Self-righteousness

Dream vacation: Greece

Like most about Maricopa: Small-town family feel

Like least about Maricopa: Heat

 

Favorite …

Charity: Anything VA related

Book: Writing one…

Movie: Eve’s Bayou

Actor: Idris Alba

Song: Blessed, Jill Scott

Musician: Jill Scott

Athlete: Stephen Curry

Food: Tacos

Drink: Red wine

Meal: Cabbage chicken wraps

Restaurant: P.F. Chang

Website: www.maricopamusicfest.us

Quote: Take Lemons and make….

Words to live by: “Fools Multiply – When Wise Men Are Silent” – Nelson Mandela

Anything else we should know? Attended Pacific Palisades College Prep High School in California and was in a Theater Group with Forest Whitaker and Roy Fegan. Worked at and attended S.D.S.U, UOPHX, then Capella. A love for music, entertainment and advertising developed into a premier marketing director position at LA Focus Newspaper, owned by Lisa Collins of Billboard & Jheryl Busby, formerly of DreamWorks Records and Motown Records. Advanced to Marketing Director for Eye on Gospel Music Magazine, also owned by Lisa Collins.

Founder/Owner of Urban Royalty Ent. (U.R.E.) AND Co-Owner of ES & URE LLC., establishes and directs most aspects of the companies Entertainment Relations activities.

Family Business: O’Jon Enterprises – Property Management & Investment Company http://www.ojonenterprises.net.

Current Movie/TV scripts and treatments written and registered include: Next Great Drummer, Chasing the Ice Cream Truck, The Vampire Slayer Parody

Past Projects – Worked on or Produced: Ladies of Gospel – City of Refuge, California – 8,000 attendees
Next Great Drummer Nationwide Search – at Sam Ash Music Stores Nationwide w/Finale at Knott’s Berry Farm – 5,000 attendees
Maricopa Music Fest 2014 – Est. attendees – 3,500,
www.maricopamusicfest.us

 

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Photo by Mason Callejas

After pool play, the Ak-Chin boys’ basketball team had a 1-2 record in the Native American Basketball Invitational being played in Maricopa and surrounding communities. The boys lost to Cheyenne Dogmen 102-53, defeated Commod Nation in a forfeit and lost to Otoe Ascend 66-59. That places Ak-Chin in the bracket matched with 0-3 Team Winnebago, which forfeited all its games. The Ak-Chin girls’ team went 0-3 in pool play. They lost to Apache Outlaws 60-31, to Lady NS 81-14, and to Court Divas 52-37. In bracket play, they are matched with 1-2 Lady Gunz on Thursday at 11 a.m. at Maricopa High School.

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American Legion Baseball - Maricopa. Submitted photo

The Maricopa American Legion Baseball team, sponsored by Post 133, finished first in the region to qualify for the state championship tournament. Round 1 of state starts Saturday.

IF YOU GO
What: American Legion #133 Baseball vs. Maricopa/Ak-Chin Leaders
When: July 13, 7:30 p.m.
Where: Copper Sky Regional Park

In the meantime, the community is invited to watch the Maricopa team take on City of Maricopa and Ak-Chin elected officials, police and fire and community business leaders in a softball game set for Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at Copper Sky. Helen’s Catering will have dinner items for sale for those who want to make a night of it.

Managing this year’s team are Maricopa High School graduates Jordan Gusse and Jesus Orci-Vega, who are undergraduates at Arizona State University, and Mountain Point graduate Jorge A. Romero.

Andres Gusse and Steven Gonzales led the team with batting averages of .571. Marcos Cano threw a perfect game and Andrew Talness was the team-leader in steals. Talsness, Gonzales, Andrews Gusse and Taylor Belcher all hit home runs during the season.

The team also included Kevin McDill, Mason Williamson, Jose Leyva, Elijah Compton, Jackson Stensgard, Joseph Talsness, Noah Huffaker, Renzo Silva, Tyler Belcher and Larry Tran.

American Legion Baseball was founded in 1925 and has taught hundreds of thousands of young Americans the importance of sportsmanship, good health and active citizenship. The program is also a promoter of equality, making teammates out of young athletes regardless of their income levels or social standings.

submitted photo

A dust storm warning is in effect for Maricopa until 8 p.m. tonight.

Winds are expected to gust up to 40 mph, and visibility may be cut to less than a mile, according to the National Weather Service.

If you encounter blowing dust or blowing sand on the roadway or see it approaching, pull off the road as far as possible and put your
vehicle in park. Turn the lights all the way off and keep your foot off the brake pedal.

The affected area is northern Pinal County and southern Maricopa County.

 

Lots of basketball is coming to Maricopa this week as well as a public hearing on the school budget and a Chamber of Commerce event featuring Apex Motor Club. Below, the Ak-Chin girls’ basketball team talks about competing in this week’s NABI tournament. For details on these and other events, or to post your own, visit http://www.inmaricopa.com/calendar/

SUNDAY

NABI Tournament Opening Ceremony is at 6:30 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Complex, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

MONDAY

Ronald McDonald visits Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road, at 10 a.m.

Color Me Calm is at 12:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Planning & Zoning Commission meets at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

MONDAY-THURSDAY

SES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Saddleback Elementary School, 18600 N. Porter Road.

MES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Maricopa Elementary School, 18150 N. Alterra Pkwy.

Teen Summer Volunteer Program is 1-5 p.m. at various locations.

Maricopa Children’s Theatre Summer Camp is at 6 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

MONDAY-FRIDAY

Native American Basketball Invitational Tournament runs from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at various locations in Maricopa, Stanfield, Bapchule and Talking Stick Resort.

TUESDAY

Daytrip to Colossal Cave leaves at 9 a.m. from Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Coffee with Friends of the Maricopa Library is at 1:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road. 

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

WEDNESDAY

CAC Chef’s Farmer’s Market is at 8 a.m. at Central Arizona College – Maricopa Campus, 17945 N. Regent Drive.

Lapsit for ages 0-12 months is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

Public Safety Personnel Retirement System Board Meeting is at 4 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

MUSD Governing Board Meeting is at 6:30 p.m. at Maricopa Unified School District, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

THURSDAY

Chamber Breakfast Mixer is at 7 a.m. at Elements Event Center at Ak Chin Circle, 16000 N. Maricopa Road.

Movers & Shakers for ages 1-2 years is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Li’l Explorers for ages 2-3 years is at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Magic with the Amazing Kaden is at 2 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY 

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

NABI Championship Games start at 10 a.m. at Talking Stick Resort.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

 

Misty Newman

By Misty Newman

Having a focus on outdoor recreation and activities creates a healthy and vibrant culture in communities. Culture includes the beliefs, customs, ways of life and behaviors that exist in a place or organization. ­­

An outdoor culture has a direct correlation with the types of recreation offered, the number of active people, mental and physical health, conservation, social aspects and even the types of restaurants and businesses in the area.

Take Sedona for example. Uptown is lined with tour companies, jeeps running everywhere and cyclists riding up Oak Creek. There are many bikes shops, like Bike & Bean, where you can stop for coffee and buy a bike and bike parts. Now, I fully realize the terrain of an area can be a natural draw for tourism and outdoor exploration. We don’t have to be a Sedona or Flagstaff, though, to still embrace an outdoor culture.

From my experience, Maricopa is a place that has already implemented a variety of activities and events throughout the years that contributes to a culture geared toward the outdoors.

We have fun runs, farmers markets, and festivals that provide residents with opportunities to be active and eat healthy. As Maricopa grows, it’s important to cultivate this culture so we’ll have even more chances to bring in businesses and recreation that contributes to this culture.

An outdoor culture also creates a social community. For example, the Salsa Festival is rooted in Maricopa’s culture; I could not imagine having a year go by without this festival. I’m sure many residents would be disappointed if this event no longer took place. The Salsa Festival provides opportunities to have great food, spend time with family, meet new people and see to top-notch entertainers.

Also, the Outdoor Recreation Program at Copper Sky established and operated by Josh Bowman, has set a high standard for how outdoor recreation programs. This program provides accessible, fun and affordable ways for residents to see our great state. The trips include camping, hiking, caving and even museum visits. Participation in these trips contribute to a healthy, active and engaged community.  

We are setting the stage now for how we want our city to operate 20 years from now. Establishing outdoor-related businesses, implementing trails that meander throughout the city and creating more outdoor-related events will be influenced by how residents perceive the importance of outdoor activity and recreation. Like many of you, I want my kids active and outdoors as much as possible.

I strongly believe having a community focused on the outdoors creates a place where people are proud to live and sustains a healthier and happier community overall.

Misty Newman is the owner of Maricopa Outdoor Adventures.


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

Murray Siegel

By Murray Siegel

Many high school students are advised to consider a four-year university education following high school graduation to prepare for adult life. For some this is great advice, but, for many, a four-year degree may not provide opportunities for a high-paying job.

Add the outstanding debt accrued to pay for that education, graduates (and those who could not complete a four-year program) may find that upon reflection, a university degree was not the proper path. University graduates with degrees in liberal arts typically find the job market for those degrees limited to positions that are not known for their outstanding starting salaries.

Thanks to a leader with real experience, Central Arizona College (CAC) offers residents of Maricopa an opportunity to obtain leading-edge training to prepare students for high-paying jobs with a real future. Dr. Jackie Elliott, the new CAC president, knows Pinal County has great potential for young people with the right technological education. She brings 27 years of experience as a senior-level community college leader.

The college has an Advanced Manufacturing program, which has started training students for immediate positions requiring knowledge in modern technical skills. Abbott Nutrition and Frito Lay, each of which has a major production facility in Casa Grande, have signed on as advisory board members for the program. These corporations will insure the graduates of CAC’s program will have the skills to enter their employ.

Lucid Motors is opening a plant to construct electric cars in Casa Grande in 2019, and this company is coordinating with CAC to guarantee that Advanced Manufacturing Program graduates will be ready to enter the line at their plant.

Engineering and Technology Department Chair Kristen Benedict has gathered an instructional staff with the knowledge to give students what they need to be successful in the world of modern manufacturing. One program in Advanced Manufacturing is a two-semester sequence leading to a certificate in one of three pathways: Production technician, production maintenance and industrial maintenance. These certificates are stackable, which means that they can lead to a two-year associates degree and to a four-year degree through Northern Arizona University. 

CAC is providing the education that will assist Maricopa in recruiting new high-tech manufacturing facilities to our city.

Murray Siegel has a PhD in MathEd and 42 years of teaching experience. He and his wife Sharon are volunteer teachers of advanced math classes at Butterfield Elementary School.


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa. 

Aaron Gilbert. Photo by William Lange

By Aaron Gilbert

Whether vegan or paleo, some carbs or no carbs, almost all “health-conscious diets” agree on one thing: You should eat your greens!

Despite unique taste preferences, almost anyone can learn to love their veggies daily with this easy 3-step formula. It creates flavor combos that balance out the bitterness and taste great.

Step 1 – Challenge Yourself

Choose a vegetable you’ve avoided in the past or have been a little afraid to try. Research shows veggie distaste is reduced with exposure. It can take 3-4 tries to start liking something you previously didn’t.

Least Bitter to Most Bitter

1 – Spinach

2 – Asparagus

3 – Broccoli

4 – Brussels Spouts

5 – Belgian Endive

6 – Swiss Chard

7 – Collard Greens

8 – Kale

9 – Chicories

10 – Rapini

11 – Radicchio

12 – Dandelion Greens

 

Step 2 – Complement Your Greens

Select 1-3 complementary items for your veggie from these categories:

Spice:

Crushed red pepper

Chopped fresh chilies

Smoked paprika

Black pepper

Chopped garlic

Ginger

Cumin

Sour:

Fresh lemon juice

Fresh lime juice

Vinegar (wine, cider, or rice)

Preserved vegetable (pickles, chilies, etc.)

Fermented vegetables (sauerkraut, kimchi, etc.)

Wine

Salty:

Dijon mustard

Salt

Capers

Anchovies

Olives

Seaweed

Brined cheese (feta, etc.)

Complements create flavor harmony, pushing several taste buttons at the same time. This covers up the certain “veggie flavors” you may not enjoy.

 

Step 3 – Buffer the Bitterness

Select 1-2 buffering items for your veggie.

Sweet:

Maple syrup

Honey

Cooked onions

Fortified wine

Berries

Oranges, tangerines, mandarin

Mirin

Fat:

Tahini

Chopped Walnuts

Olive oil

Cooked bacon

Avocado

Soft cheese (goat, etc.)

Sliced almonds

Butter

Don’t freak out if these buffers sound calorie-dense. It only takes a little bit to balance out bitterness, not a cup of oil or a pound of bacon.

 

Step 4 – Pick your method

Wash your vegetable thoroughly. If cooking, chop them into equal-sized pieces.

Raw:

Cut veggies to desired size and arrange them on your plate.

Top with complements and buffers.

Recommended veggies:

Spinach

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Belgian endive

Kale

Chicories

Radicchio

Steam:

Place veggies in a single layer in steam pot with 1 inch of water.

Cook over high heat for 3 min.

Garnish with complements and buffers.

Recommended Veggies:

Spinach

Asparagus

Broccoli

Sauté:

Place damp veggies in single layer in sauté pan with a drizzle of cooking oil.

Cook on medium-high for about 10 min.

Add salty, sweet and/or spice midway through cooking.

Garnish with sour and/or fat.

Recommended veggies:

Belgian endive

Swiss chard

Collard greens

Dandelion greens

Kale

Chicories

Rapini

Braise:

Place veggies in single layer in large pot over medium heat; drizzle with cooking oil.

Add salty, spice and/or sweet along with enough water to half-submerge veggies.

Lower heat, cover and cook until tender but still firm, 15-45 min.

Garnish with sour and or fat.

Recommended veggies:

Belgian endive

Swiss chard

Collard greens

Dandelion greens

Kale

Chicories

Rapini

Aaron Gilbert, CSCS is founder/owner of Longevity Athletics.

520-261-4661

Aaron@LongevityAthletics.com


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

 

The driver of a Civic was injured when the vehicle rolled over on a dirt road. Photo by Mason Callejas

One person was hurt this afternoon when a Honda Civic rolled on a dirt road near the intersection of Farrell Road and High Lonesome Road, east of White and Parker Road.

The driver, reportedly a pizza-delivery employee, was injured when the vehicle flipped over at least once. It came to rest on all four tires on an embankment.

Maricopa Fire/Medical responded to the scene. The driver was transported by ambulance with an apparent cut to the head.

 

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Expected and unexpected traffic delays have resulted from prep work near the intersection of Sate Route 347 and Maricopa-Casa Grande Highway.

Though groundbreaking for the construction of the overpass is expected in autumn, preparation work has been obvious along John Wayne Parkway from Hathaway Avenue to Alterra Parkway. That has already impacted traffic, and the City of Maricopa launched a webpage to keep residents apprised of road activity.

OverpassTracker.com offers updates and maps and links to the project page hosted by Arizona Department of Transportation.

Work this spring included relocating utility lines on portions of State Route 347, Honeycutt Road and Maricopa-Casa Grande Highway. Workers moved the fire administration building off its site in the path of the overpass to its temporary location on Edison Road. Parking shelters were also removed. Much of the work affecting traffic was done at night, but some utility work unexpectedly clogged daytime traffic as well.

The overpass webpage and a hotline (520-316-6910) were created to keep citizens informed of such changes.

The $50 million project creates six lanes on a bridge over the Union Pacific Railroad tracks to relieve the convergence of more than 31,000 cars and 40 trains a day.

Crews did night work to lessen some of the impact on traffic flow. Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

This article appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

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Photo by Ron Bernier

By Ron Bernier

Ron Bernier

The good news in the low desert of Arizona is that there are two growing seasons. That means you can grow a wide variety of vegetables during the course of the year. The bad news is the growing seasons are short, and we have to plan to get the most production from our home gardens in this short amount of time.

We are currently in the warm growing season. The season ends when the temperatures get too high for plants to produce viable pollen and the pollinators (mostly bees) are less active.

Warm season plants are typically those that have edible fruits – corn, cucumber, eggplant, tomatoes, melons, squash, peppers, pumpkins, jicama and okra. For a detailed vegetable planting schedule for Maricopa, visit the Master Gardeners’ page on the University of Arizona web site.

You can make the warm growing season longer by following these tips:

TIPS

It is not early to start thinking about what you want to plant for the cool season. Cool season plants typically have edible leaves, stems and roots. Examples include beets, cabbage, broccoli, asparagus, carrots, lettuce, mustard, parsley, radish, turnips and peas. The cool season runs from August, when temperatures start to fall, and runs until the first frost. You can start planting seeds in August while the ground is still warm enough to encourage germination. Transplants usually go in starting in September. You will be able to harvest until the first frost. Use the Vegetable Planting Schedule mentioned above to help select plants and timing for your own garden.

  1. When possible, plant varieties that can be started from transplants. Plants that are started indoors from seed or in a greenhouse can give you a great head start on days to harvest.
  2. Monitor your plants daily for heat stress. Plants show stress by leaves withering and stunted growth. Use a moisture meter daily to ensure your plants have the right amount of water as the days grow longer and hotter. Adjust watering durations as required.
  3. Make sure your plants have sufficient nutrients available. Many vegetable plants are heavy feeders and will require additional applications of fertilizer during the growing season. Follow the recommendations on the package when applying fertilizer. Remember that as you increase the amount of water required in the hot months, you will also have to shorten the time between feedings as water will leach nutrients from the planting bed.
  4. Use shade cloth to protect plants from overheating and sunburn. Install shade cloth to protect plants from both mid- and late-day sun (west side of garden). Shade cloth comes in varying degrees of sunlight filtering. Use cloth that offers 60-70 percent protection. Don’t completely block the sun as this will really slow down growth and production.

 

Ron Bernier is a Master Gardener and a resident of Maricopa.

Extension.Arizona.edu/master-gardeners


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa

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Photo by Mason Callejas
The most expensive home sold in Maricopa from May 16 to June 15 is a waterfront lot in Province with four bedrooms and an in-laws quarters. Selling for its list price of $400,000, the 11-year-old house was on the market more than a year and sold for 10.6 percent less than its previous sale two years ago. The property first sold in 2010 for $269,000.
1. 42463 W. Blue Suede Shoes Lane

Sold: June 15
Purchase price: $400,000
Square feet: 3,173
Price per square foot: $126
Days on market: 441
Builder: Engle
Year built: 2006
Bedrooms: 4
Bathrooms: 4
Community: Province
Features: Two master suites, three-car garage, covered back patio with gas fire pit, four bathrooms, upgrades
Seller’s agent: William G. Menkhus, HomeSmart
Buyer’s agent: Chris Levally, Launch Real Estate

2. 21884 N. Olson Court, Rancho El Dorado, $379,500
3. 2226 N. Reinbold Drive, Rancho El Dorado, $370,000
4. 40955 W. Hopper Drive, Homestead North, $355,000
5. 22129 N. Cline Court, Rancho El Dorado, $352,500


This article appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

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Photo by Mason Callejas

The least expensive home sold in Maricopa from May 16 to June 15 went for 21.7 percent above its previous sale price but $20,000 below its asking price. The three-bedroom home in Homestead has an open design for a spacious feel. The 1,500-square-foot house sits on a 6,000-square-foot lot and sold the day it went on the market.

 1.       40740 W. Sanders Way

Sold: May 19
Purchase price: $125,000
Square feet: 1,527
Price per square foot: $81.85
Days on market: 0
Builder: DR Horton
Year built: 2010
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 2

Community: Homestead
Features: Covered patio, kitchen appliances, vaulted ceilings, marble bath tops, birch cabinets, master bath with double sinks
Seller’s agent: Kum Ran Han, HomeSmart Success
Buyer’s agent: Marc Montgomery, HomeSmart Success

2. 42551 W. Colby Drive, Rancho El Dorado, $129,000
3. 36516 W. La Paz St., Tortosa, $130,000
4. 19271 N. Toledo Ave., Tortosa, $130,000
5. 21272 N. Duncan Drive, Rancho El Dorado, $130,000


This article appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

Scott Bartle hiking The Narrows in Zion National Park last month.

Scott Bartle has been the publisher of InMaricopa since 2004, when he founded the company.

Hometown: Wanamaker, Indiana

Maricopan: 2004-2016

Occupation: Publisher, InMaricopa

Family: Wife, 2 stepsons, mom, dad, brother, sister, 5 nieces, 3 godchildren

Pets: Indy, a 12-year-old lab/shepherd mix, and stepdog Dixie, a white schnauzer

Car: Lexus

Hobbies: Chasing toddlers, traveling, hiking, golf, physical therapy

Pet peeves: Distracted driving, Round 1 NCAA Tournament losses, ear hair

Like most about Maricopa: Knowing everyone

Like least about Maricopa: Everyone knowing you

 

Favorite …

Movie: Top Gun

Celebrity: Justin Timberlake

Musician/Band: Straight No Chaser

Concert: Whodini

Team: Indiana Hoosiers

Nonprofit: Hospice

Meal: Filet, asparagus, baked or sweet potato, red wine

Drink: Chocolate milk

Restaurant: See www.InMaricopa.com/Directory

Vacation spot: Bloomington, Indiana

Website: www.InMaricopa.com, followed by www.ESPN.com

Words to live by: Do unto others as you’d have done unto yourself.

Joke: Three men walked into a bar. The fourth one ducked.

SG Rho-Maricopa members (from left) Javai Harris, Linette Caroselli and Yolanda Ewing. Submitted photo

By Linette Y. Caroselli

Linette Caroselli

The Be Awesome Youth Coalition has many local partners to assist in its mission of educating youth about the dangers of drugs and alcohol. Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. is proud to be a consistent partner. Sisterhood, scholarship and service are the pillars of this 94-year-old service organization.

It is the mission of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc., which has 85,000 members, to enhance the quality of life for women and their families in the United States and globally through community service, civil and social action.

Currently, there are three active graduate members in Maricopa, and they have been extremely busy upholding the sorority’s motto of “Greater Service, Greater Progress.” Yolanda Ewing is the executive program director for Families First CDC in Maricopa. Javai Harris is an administrative secretary at Maricopa Community Colleges for Healthcare Education and President of Global Peacemakers Corps. I am a veteran middle school teacher in the Maricopa Unified School District 20. Together, we bring a wealth of experience and knowledge to the city of Maricopa.

The following programs have been implemented thus far:

  • Operation Big Book Bag – Members supplied students with school supplies 2x a year
  • Human Trafficking Parent Workshops – Educating parents on how to protect their kids from Internet predators
  • Cancer Awareness Workshop – Taught students what cancer was and what they can do to help prevent it
  • Youth Symposium/Run Jump Throw Event – Day dedicated to youth at Santa Rosa and Maricopa Elementary Schools promoting the sorority’s national program Project Reassurance’s H3: It’s All About Me – Healthy Living, Healthy Choices and Healthy Generations along with track and field activities
  • Co-Sponsored the Families First CDC sixth annual Fashion Show Fundraiser
  • Swim 1922 – Partnered with the Arizona Seals for a swim clinic teaching water safety and swimming
  • Hosted a Mother’s Day Dinner & Show – Featuring NFocus the Band

Would you like to serve with us? New members of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. are accepted on the undergraduate and graduate level. Potential graduate members must hold a degree from a four-year accredited college/university. Contact Yolanda at maricopasgrho@gmail.com.

 

Linette Y. Caroselli is a teacher and a member of Families First CDC.

Joby Thompson

Joby Thompson has been selected to attend the “Business Perspectives for Creative Leaders” program at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, July 23-28.

The conference is a week-long executive education program for design professionals in partnership with Yale University’s School of Management. The curriculum features case studies, lectures, hands-on activities, and group work to give creative leaders a more complete understanding of business and design.

Maricopa High School is a member of the Central Arizona Vocational Institute of Technology (CAVIT), which is paying all expenses for the training.

Thompson is currently the MHS Career and Technical Education (CTE) Department chairperson where he teaches graphic design classes.


This item appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

Photo by Raquel Hendrickson

Maricopa Music Circle chamber orchestra invites city musicians to grab their instruments and stands and sit in starting in mid-July as the orchestra resumes preparations for fall and winter performances.

The ensemble’s rehearsals on July 17, 24, 31 and Aug. 7 will serve as “open auditions” for interested players, as it begins preparations for the upcoming season. Its planned performances over the 2017-2018 concert season include the Winter Serenade event also featuring Maricopa Chorus as guest artists.

Now in the midst of its eighth season, Maricopa Music Circle is considered the city’s premier performing ensemble. It has partnered with every other hometown performing-arts organization in dance, theatre and music and has also performed at a number of City special events, for Art on the Veranda, and for special Star Wars and Oscars events at UltraStar Multi-tainment Center. The orchestra is well-known for its joy in performance and its commitment to presenting music in many styles from cultures all around the world, composed over the span of four centuries.

MMC players range from professional musicians to enthusiastic amateurs, and often include high-school musicians in the mix. Musicians are expected to be able sight-readers and be comfortable playing standard orchestral parts at the level of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite.

Rehearsals are 7-9:45 p.m. on Monday evenings at private homes around the city and are always lively experiences. There is no fee to join. Interested musicians should e-mail MMC by Thursday of the preceding week to indicate their instrument and playing level to get details of the upcoming rehearsal site and for music to be rehearsed. MaricopaMusicCircle@yahoo.com

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"The Declaration of Independence" by American artist John Trumbull

In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America,

 

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.

He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their Public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.

He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness of his invasions on the rights of the people.

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected, whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.

He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.

He has obstructed the Administration of Justice by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary Powers.

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.

He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people and eat out their substance.

He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures.

He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil Power.

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

For protecting them, by a mock Trial from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:

For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:

For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:

For depriving us in many cases, of the benefit of Trial by Jury:

For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences:

For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies

For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments:

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.

He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.

He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation, and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & Perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation.

He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.

We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these united Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

Signed

John Hancock, Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry, Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery, Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott, William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris, Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark, Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, James Wilson, George Ross, George Read, Caesar Rodney, Thomas McKean, Samuel Chase, William Paca, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton, William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn, Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton, Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton

Cool drinks in a cool pool under the night sky help guests at Harrah's Ak-Chin beat the heat. Submitted photo

Maricopa summers are inevitably among the hottest in the state, so finding ways to stay cool is a high priority for residents. The heat can have a negative impact on some business, but many adjust to create different ways to keep their customers refreshed. For some business owners, in fact, summer is the busiest time of the year. Following is a sampling of Maricopa businesses meeting the challenge of summer head on.

 

Bet on it

Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino

Director of Marketing and Operations: Michael Kintner

Products/Services: Entertainment, hospitality, gaming and dining

In Maricopa since: 1994

How does summer impact your business: We say goodbye to our winter visitors, but we are excited to continue to host our loyal Total Rewards members. Everyone knows everyone and we enjoy spending time with our local friends.

Most frequent request at your business during summer: It doesn’t matter if it’s summer; our guests always enjoy cool drinks and hot games… and a jackpot or two doesn’t hurt!

What is your favorite part of summer: Enjoying time with my family and friends. Camping and taking out the new RV and staying cool with the dogs.

 

Water and Ice. Photo by Victor Moreno

Creamy Coolness

Maricopa’s Water and Ice

Owners: Tonya Thompson and Michael Thompson

Products/Services: Best tasting purified water and ice through extensive reverse osmosis, alkaline water, water bottles/crocks/stands, Thrifty Ice Cream, real fruit smoothies, wall of nostalgic candy, over 100 Hawaiian Shaved Ice Flavors, Advocare “We Build Champions” products, soft-serve ice cream – shakes, sundaes and biggest banana splits.

In Maricopa since: 2004

How does summer impact your business: Business doubles! We cool off twice as many people in the summer as we do in the winter with cool treats.

Most frequent request at your business during summer: Hawaiian Shaved Ice and Thrifty Ice Cream

What is your favorite part of summer: Seeing all the smiling faces coming through the front door to cool off!

Arroyo Grille at Ak-Chin Southern Dunes. Photo by Anita McLeod

Some light refreshment

Arroyo Grille at Ak-Chin Southern Dunes Golf Club

Executive Chef: Neil Magbanua

Products/Services: Breakfast, lunch and dinner

In Maricopa since: 2005 (original clubhouse restaurant)

How does summer impact your business: Summer slows down dramatically because of the heat; as a result, we are more diligent with scheduling and product ordering.

Most frequent request at your business during summer: Milkshakes, salads and light, refreshing meals

What is your favorite part of summer: There is more time to spend with friends and family and vacations.

Native Grill & Wings. Photo by Anita McLeod

A nice cold beer

Native Grill & Wings

Owner: Pat Kieny

Products/Services: Family restaurant and bar

In Maricopa since: 2005

How does summer impact your business: During June and July as customers are vacationing, it is slower. The rush at night starts later because of the heat.

Most frequent request at your business during summer: Make sure the AC and the beer are cold.

What is your favorite part of summer: I like that the roads, golf courses and shopping are not as congested.

 

Something in the air

McLaughlin Air Conditioning and Heating Service

Owner/Operator: Bruce McLaughlin

Products/Services: Air conditioning and heating repairs, installation and new-build construction for homes and businesses located within 100 miles of Maricopa.

In Maricopa since: We have had family here in Maricopa since 2004 and started McLaughlin Air full time at the end of 2014.

How does summer impact your business: Summer time for any air conditioning company can be challenging and very demanding. The smile on a happy customer who now has a working AC makes it worthwhile.

Most frequent request at your business during summer: The most common call we get is, “The AC has been running great for years and we never serviced it but now has stopped cooling.” The misconception on an AC unit is that if it’s running and cooling it must be OK.

What is your favorite part of summer: Any water sport is a must, and nothing beats stopping into the local Water and Ice store for some ice cream or shaved ice. I really enjoy the skies at night and the electric storms with the monsoon season. As someone who enjoys the heat when below 110, summer is very enjoyable and the rest of the time we make do and drink lots of water.

Absolute Companies, LLC. Photo by Anita McLeod

Cool down bug-free

Absolute Companies, LLC

Owners: Shane and Brennan Phillips

Products/Services: Air conditioning service, pest control and pool services

In Maricopa since: 2010

How does summer impact your business: The higher temperatures create more demand for all our services. Air conditioning maintenance and repair is in high demand due to the increased wear and tear placed on the equipment. Summer also brings out the ticks, bedbugs and bark scorpions. Pools are in full use in summer.

Most frequent request at your business during summer: We are a growing company, but the air conditioning repair is currently our busiest segment.

What is your favorite part of summer: I always enjoy the monsoon lightning shows. Some nights can have hundreds of lightning flashes.

Yogurt Jungle. Photo by Anita McLeod

The frozen treat

Yogurt Jungle

Owners: Bo Johnson and Michelle Harl

Products/Services: Frozen yogurt, smoothies, banana splits, shakes and floats

In Maricopa since: 2011

How does summer impact your business:  A nice cold treat and nice cold AC draw a crowd.

What is your favorite part of summer: Swimming and eating frozen yogurt, of course

Copa Craze. Photo by Anita McLeod

Shake it up

Copa Craze

Owners: Lisa and J Curtis

Products/Services: Energy drinks plus smoothies packed with Herbalife Nutrition, coaches to help people get great health results

In Maricopa since: 2012

Most frequent request at your business during summer: Icy drinks, smoothies and teas, also ice cream sandwiches

What is your favorite part of summer: I love the extra family time in the summer months.


This article appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

Air Force Airman 1st Class Jonathan Sheaffer of Maricopa removes a bolt from a water separator filter on an R-11 refueling truck at Goldwater Air National Guard Base in Phoenix. Sheaffer is a vehicle maintenance apprentice in the Arizona Air National Guard's 161st Air Refueling Wing. Arizona Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Matkin

By Tech. Sgt. Michael Matkin, 161st Air Refueling Wing

Airman 1st Class Jonathan Sheaffer wears a fireman’s helmet as a hazardous material technician for the City of Maricopa Fire/Medical Department, a coach’s cap as an assistant high school football coach and a duty cap as a vehicle maintenance apprentice in Arizona’s KC-135 Stratotanker unit.

In April, he was named Airman of the Year for the entire Arizona Air National Guard – an honor bestowed only upon the most well-rounded, high-performance junior leaders.

“The military, fire department and football organizations are very similar,” Sheaffer said. “You can put them side by side and they will match up. The titles may be different, but there is still an organizational chart and chain of command. You still need a certain amount of people and special tools, but the structure of it is set up the same way and someone is delegating authority, whether it’s the head coach, the wing commander or [fire department] captain.”

Tailored Leadership

He said in each of these structures there’s a leader shaping the organization, but, in his opinion, the most effective leaders are those who can tailor their leadership style to the individual.

“Knowing people interpret situations differently, your leadership style will also affect them differently,” Sheaffer said. “Everyone’s going to have a difference in perspective and leaders should take those perspectives in consideration.”

As a football coach, Sheaffer learned first-hand the nuances of customizing leadership styles. He said some kids can be pushed hard, while yelling at others may cause them to break down; and then he has failed them.

“I’m not just coaching them to be good football players, I’m coaching and educating them to be good people,” he said. “If I cause a kid to crumble, they’ll be less receptive.”

Having these leadership skills helped Sheaffer when he entered Air Force basic training and was chosen as his flight’s dorm chief during the first week of training; a position he held through graduation. He said his prior experience as a leader, and as a follower, made it easier to talk and listen to his fellow Airmen – urging them to do their best.

“Everyone’s background and situation isn’t the same, especially in the military,” Sheaffer said. “There are people from all over the country with diverse cultures, so the same leadership style won’t work for everyone.”

He said customizing leadership and listening to subordinates is one of the great things he has learned as a junior firefighter. Firefighters have all had the training and they all know ways to complete their tasks; however, when they are on scene of an accident Sheaffer’s leaders seek input from the team to come up with an incident action plan.

‘Someone else may have a better plan’

“The captain will tell us ‘OK, we are going to do these three steps and meet these benchmarks,’” Sheaffer said. “If we don’t meet those goals we pull back and re-evaluate as a team and ask ‘do we need to change strategies and do something else?’ I’ve learned that even if you are the guy in charge sometimes someone else may have a better plan. You have to consider other’s perspectives even if it’s not the right way to do it or the way things need to be done. They will appreciate you having openly acknowledged their insight.”

Sheaffer said he witnessed this dynamic leadership in the vehicle maintenance shop during his first day of on-the-job training after having returned from Air Force technical school.

“We were removing the cab off one of the Security Forces trucks, and I was amazed at all the hands involved completing the task and how everyone’s input was valued,” Sheaffer said. “We were each assigned an area of responsibility; making sure all the lines and hoses were clear as the cab was lifted. Leadership made it known if anyone saw something snagging or any other kind of problem, you had carte blanche to halt the removal.”

Sheaffer said his shop leaders’ example showed him they truly care about each Airman.

“If a message needs to be conveyed that a behavior or a process needs to be changed, it is directed in a constructive manner,” he said. “Just like the football player, they present it in a way that I don’t internalize the message and feel criticized.”

Sheaffer said he hopes as he grows in his roles as an airman and as a citizen that he can utilize the lessons he’s learned from his current and past leadership.

“I won’t have personal contact with everyone in my different roles, whether at a city, state or national level,” he said. “However, if I conduct myself in certain way, my small part in the big machine can ultimately impact everyone. Even if it’s just marginally enough that they feel safer, have a sense of pride for the nation and feel peace because we military members have done the best we can.”

Sheaffer replaces an engine oil filter on an R-11 refueling truck at Goldwater Air National Guard Base. A hazardous material technician for Maricopa Fire/Medical Department, he is also a high school assistant football coach. Arizona Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael Matkin

This story appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

Vincent Manfredi

A New Jersey native, Vincent Manfredi has been a Maricopan for seven years. He was elected to city council in 2014.

Resides in: Maricopa Meadows

Maricopan since: 2010

Occupation: Director of Advertising and Maricopa Councilmember

Family: Wife and 3 Daughters

Pets: Oreo a mixed bread terrier we adopted.

Cars: Honda Pilot

Hobbies: Motorcycle riding, politics and coaching softball

Pet peeve: Liars

Dream vacation: Rome

Like most about Maricopa: The community and the overall cost of living

Like least about Maricopa: The 347

Favorite …

Charity: Streets Don’t Love You Back

Book: 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Movie: Zombieland

Actor: Clint Eastwood

Song: All time is My Way by Frank Sinatra, currently Humble by Kendrick Lamar

Musician: Frank Sinatra

Team: Chicago Bears or whatever teams my daughters are playing on at the time!

Athlete: Tie between Daisy and Amelia (my daughters)

Food: Italian, followed by Cuban

Drink: Coke Zero

Getaway: My computer room to play some video games

Website: http://www.inmaricopa.com

Quote: “The most terrifying words in the English language are: I’m from the government and I’m here to help.” – Ronald Reagan

Words to live by: All that matters is what you do, not what you planned or dreamed about doing.

Joke: The health service in this country is a disgrace. My doctor told me to run 3 miles a day for a month. I’m now completely lost and 90 miles away from home.

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Pat Lairson

By Pat Lairson

Whether renting or owning, everyone needs a place to live. With the price of rents soaring across the Valley, why do people choose to still rent over buying?

The average rental amount in Maricopa is $1,200 a month, and the average rental price in Chandler is $1,811 a month. It takes about three years from the time you purchase your home to gain enough equity to sell it again and have some equity left to put in your pocket. If you know you will live in a certain area for up to three years or are OK to become a landlord should you move, then buying a home now should be on your to-do list.

If you choose to proceed to buy a home, the first step is to get prequalified. The three most typical loan types are conventional, FHA and VA. All require different criteria and different amounts of a down payment.

Any loan where a buyer does not put 20 percent of the purchase price down usually results in PMI, or a private mortgage insurance cost added to your monthly loan amount. In the state of Arizona your taxes and home insurance are impounded into your escrow account so the monthly mortgage you pay will include these two items.

There is still a No Down Payment Assistance program available for buyers who have little or no down payment or simply want to use this program instead of their own funds. It is called Home Plus, and here are some of the qualifications for this program:

  1. AZ E-housing gift amount is between 3 percent and 5 percent, depending on the type of loan, that can go toward down payment or closing costs.
  2. Maximum annual income limit of $92,984.
  3. Maximum purchase price $371,936.
  4. No first-time buyer requirements. Buyers can own other real estate.
  5. Seller concessions are allowed.

This is an awesome way to become a homeowner, and the funds do not have to be paid back.

There are approximately 280 available homes for sale in Maricopa. The current price range starts at $144,000 and goes up to $480,000.

 

Pat Lairson, Realtor
The Maricopa Real Estate Company
520-280-5862
Patlairsonrealtor@gmail.com


This column appears in the July issue of InMaricopa.

The Fourth of July provides a mid-week national holiday among Maricopa’s upcoming activities, and that means a big celebration with fireworks at Copper Sky. But that’s not all. Below, Ak-Chin Southern Dunes General Manager Brady Wilson invites the community to a golf scramble that morning, followed by a barbecue. For details on these and other events, or to add your own, visit http://www.inmaricopa.com/calendar/

MONDAY

Color Me Calm is at 12:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

MONDAY-THURSDAY (except Tuesday)

SES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Saddleback Elementary School, 18600 N. Porter Road.

MES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Maricopa Elementary School, 18150 N. Alterra Pkwy.

Teen Summer Volunteer Program is 1-5 p.m. at various locations.

Maricopa Children’s Theatre Summer Camp is 6-8:30 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

TUESDAY

July 4 Scramble golf tournament starts at 7:30 a.m. at Ak-Chin Southern Dunes, 48456 W. Hwy. 238.

Great American 4th is 6-10 p.m. at Copper Sky Regional Park, 44345 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

WEDNESDAY

CAC Chef’s Farmer’s Market is at 8 a.m. at Central Arizona College – Maricopa Campus, 17945 N. Regent Drive.

Lapsit for ages 0-12 is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Free seminar on financial statements is at 11 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

THURSDAY

Movers & Shakers for ages 1-2 is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Li’l Explorers for ages 2-3 is at 10 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

Paddlesports Education Course is at 6:30 a.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Atlas PET Rescue Fundraiser is 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at Copper Sky Recreation Complex, 44345 W Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Guided LEGO Build is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

SUNDAY

NABI Basketball Tournament Opening Ceremony is at 6:30 p.m. at Copper Sky Recreation Complex, 44345 W Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

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Donna McBride, CASA supervisor

By Donna McBride

At a time when our country is celebrating its independence, hundreds of kids in Arizona’s foster care system are trying to find theirs without the guidance and direction that traditionally comes from parents.

Teens who enter the foster care system are at a disadvantage when it comes to independence. They are more likely than younger children to be placed in a group home or shelter situation with up to a dozen other youth and limited opportunities for personal growth. This hits hard at a time when most other kids their age are getting ready to drive, graduate high school and date.

There are thousands of teens in foster care in Arizona and every six months more than 500 of them reach the age of 18 and head out into the world on their own. The community can help. Studies have shown one caring, consistent adult can have a life-changing impact on a child in foster care. That’s why the Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) Program is so important.

CASA advocates ensure not only that a child in foster care has a consistent adult presence but that they have the services and support they need to thrive. CASA advocates are appointed to one case and visit the children involved with that case regularly. They gather vital information which is shared in a court report with the judge who will ultimately make decisions regarding the child’s living situation.

Children with a CASA volunteer assigned to them are more likely to receive services and resources; twice as likely to find a safe, permanent home; and half as likely to re-enter the foster care system. Unfortunately, very few children get the support of a CASA volunteer.

There are currently more than 1,000 CASA volunteers serving children all over Arizona. Pinal County has nearly 80 CASA advocates serving but with roughly 1,200 children in foster care, we need help.  CASA of Pinal County encourages more people to get involved. To learn more about the program, contact Community Outreach Coordinator Ashley Flores at 520-866-7080 or AFlores@courts.az.gov.

 

Donna McBride is a program administrator for Pinal County Juvenile Court Services and supervisor of the CASA unit.

Events this week include puppet theater, baseball camp and a Grammy-winning musician.

It’s mostly light fare for activities this week, and mostly aimed at the kids. Below, MHS coach Andrew Pollak invites third graders through eighth graders to the Rams Youth Baseball Camp. For details on these and other listings, or to add your own, visit http://www.inmaricopa.com/calendar/.

MONDAY

Great Arizona Puppet Theatre is at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Color Me Calm is at 12:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting is at 6 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W Honeycutt Ave.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

MONDAY-THURSDAY

SES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Saddleback Elementary School, 18600 N. Porter Road.

MES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Maricopa Elementary School, 18150 N. Alterra Parkway.

Teen Summer Volunteer Program is 1-5 p.m. at various locations.

Maricopa Children’s Theatre Summer Camp is at 6 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

TUESDAY

Coffee with Friends of the Maricopa Library is at 1:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Meet the new chamber director at 5:30 p.m. at Maricopa Chamber of Commerce, 44480 W. Honeycutt Road, Suite 106.

Celebrate Recovery Large & Small Group Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

WEDNESDAY

CAC Chef’s Farmer’s Market is at 8 a.m. at Central Arizona College – Maricopa Campus, 17945 N. Regent Drive.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

Anime for Teens is at 5:30 p.m., part of the Summer Reading Program at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

MUSD Governing Board meets at 6:30 p.m. at 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Hwy.

WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY

Rams Youth Baseball Camp for third through eighth grade is at 8 a.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

THURSDAY

Lapsit for ages 0-12 months is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Movers & Shakers for ages 1-2 years is at 9:30 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Li’l Explorers for ages 2-3 years is at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Jungle Jill Animal Encounters is at 2 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Sunny Sauceda, Grammy-winning Tejano artist, will a free concert at 7 p.m. at The Lounge at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 N. Maricopa Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Multigenerational Game Night is at 6:30 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

 

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Bret Roberts. Submitted photo

Bret Roberts is the latest candidate to announce a run for a House seat in Legislative District 11. A Republican, Roberts is the constable of the Maricopa/Stanfield Justice Court.

He will be running as a team with current representative Vince Leach and Mark Finchem. State Sen. Steve Smith announced he intends to run for U.S. Congress. Leach then announced he would run for Smith’s seat in the Senate, leaving his House seat without an incumbent.

“Having Steve Smith, Vince Leach, and Mark Finchem at the Capitol has been great for our district, and they’ve set the bar very high in terms of their voting record and constituent service,” Roberts stated in his announcement.  “I’m honored that Vince and Mark have agreed to support me, and I promise to work hard to meet the high standards they have set.”

Roberts is not the first Maricopa Republican to file his committee paperwork to run for the House in 2018. Bridger Kimball, a former city councilmember, announced his candidacy earlier this month. Barry McCain, a Democrat, has also filed to run for the House seat.

Roberts has lived in Maricopa since 2009. Married with three grown children, he has been a loan processor and a detention officer. He was elected constable in 2014.

This week’s activities are mostly inside, with some notable exceptions. Below coach Derrick Warford and his players talk about Saturday’s AZEA Wellness Tour. For details on these and other listings, or to add your own, visit http://www.inmaricopa.com/calendar/

MONDAY-THURSDAY

SES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Saddleback Elementary School, 18600 N. Porter Road.

MES Summer Fun & Fitness is 1-5 p.m. at Maricopa Elementary School, 18150 N. Alterra Parkway.

Teen Summer Volunteer Program is at 1 p.m. at various locations.

Maricopa Children’s Theatre Summer Camp is at 6 p.m. at Copper Sky Multigenerational Center, 44345 W. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

MONDAY

Fairytale Princesses appear at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Color Me Calm is at 12:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Alcoholics Anonymous Meeting is at 6 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 18700 N. Porter Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

TUESDAY

Coffee with Friends of the Maricopa Library is at 1:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Maricopa Police Explorer Post Meeting is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Celebrate Recovery Coffee & Karaoke is at 5 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Open House – Bike & Pedestrian Crossing of UPRR is at 5:30 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

City Council Work Session is at 6 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

City Council Regular Session is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa City Hall, 39700 W. Civic Center Plaza.

WEDNESDAY

CAC Chef’s Farmer’s Market is 8-11 a.m. at Central Arizona College – Maricopa Campus, 17945 N. Regent Drive.

Harrah’s Club 777 Toastmasters meet at 3 p.m. at Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, 15406 Maricopa Road.

Navy Care Packages will be packed by Blue Star Mothers at 6 p.m. at Maricopa Center for Entrepreneurship, 20800 N. John Wayne Pkwy, Ste. 108.

THURSDAY

Lapsit for ages 0-12 months is at 9 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Movers & Shakers for ages 1-2 years is at 9:30 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Li’l Explorers for ages 2-3 is at 10 a.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

Step Up Clydesdale will be horsing around at 2 p.m. at Maricopa Public Library, 41600 W. Smith-Enke Road.

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Ak-Chin Social Services, 48227 W. Farrell Road.

FRIDAY

Strength & Hope Al-Anon Meeting is at 7 p.m. at Community of Hope Church, 45295 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SATURDAY

AZEA Wellness Tour and Prove It 7 on 7 & Skills Combine starts at 9 a.m. at Ram Stadium at Maricopa High School, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave.

SUNDAY

A Ray of Hope meeting of Narcotics Anonymous is at 7 p.m. at Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave. 

Raquel Hendrickson

Raquel Hendrickson has been the editor of InMaricopa.com since November 2014.

 

Hometown: Snowflake, Arizona

Resides in: Rancho El Dorado

Maricopan since: 2014

Occupation: Journalist

Cars: Ford F150

Hobbies: Storytelling, art, theater, sports

Pet peeve: New technology that only works for about a month

Dream vacation: The Curragh

Like most about Maricopa: People who participate in the process

Like least about Maricopa: Aggressive drivers

 

Favorite …

Charity: Children’s Miracle Network

Book: “Great Expectations,” by Charles Dickens

Movie: Lawrence of Arabia

Actor: Alec Guinness

Song: Too many to choose from – something Gershwin or Carmichael

Musician: Wynton Marsalis, Billy Joel, Gene Krupa

Team: St. Louis Cardinals

Athlete: Billy Mills

Food: Chimichangas

Drink: Mint lemonade

Meal: A full Irish breakfast

Restaurant: Cunetto House of Pasta, St. Louis

Getaway: Utah Shakespeare Festival

Website: NASA.gov

Quote: “How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.” — George Washinton Carver

Words to live by: Be yourself

Joke: “I haven’t slept for 10 days, because that would be too long” — Mitch Hedberg

Anything else we should know? Seventh-generation Arizonan, but spent my school years in the Missouri Ozarks, graduating from Hartville High School. Have also lived in Lancaster and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Provo, Utah, and Camp Verde, Arizona. Sports editor for eight years in Missouri. Helped Ingard Clausen compile interviews with incredibly brilliant engineers for his book “Intelligence Revolution 1960: Retrieving the Corona Imagery that Helped Win the Cold War.” Nicknamed “Rocky” since birth because of Raquel Welch – long story.