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Primary Election

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Arizona Corporation Commission candidates Justin Olson, Jim O'Connor and Bill Mundell congratulate each other after taking audience questions Aug. 4. Photo by Victor Moreno

Candidates running for state and legislative seats answered questions from the public at the InMaricopa.com Town Hall Saturday. From Arizona Corporation Commission to treasurer, they address a wide range of issues.

Maricopa resident Tena Dugan asked candidates campaigning for seats on the Corporation Commission what they would do for Global Water Customers.

Candidates largely referenced claims of corruption on the current commission and their promises to act in consumers’ best interests on how they would protect local water customers.

Former Commissioner Sandra Kennedy, who is fighting to return to the commission, said she has experience with the company.

“I worked very hard during my tenure, and I fought tooth and nail with Global Water,” Kennedy said. “I came down here during their rate case hearing and I listened to the people and I heard every word you said and everything you said to me, I put it in writing and I made Global Water do everything that the community down here wanted.”

Six State Representatives candidates for LD 11 discussed SR 347 funding, taxes and higher education funding.

Maricopa Councilmember Nancy Smith took the microphone to confront one incumbent and the other five hopefuls on how they would stop “passing the buck” to cities and counties while balancing the state budget.

“I am a protector of our city budget, I take it very seriously,” Smith said. “I have a big concern with the common practice that our legislatures have of balancing the budget on the backs of cities and counties.”

Smith said in the past, state budgets have cause Pinal County to increase taxes and the city to forego helpful programs to residents.

Democratic candidate Hollace Lyon said the state should “collaborate, not dictate” with cities and towns.

In the LD11 Senate race, in which there is no primary election, Republican Vince Leach, in his second term in the state house, and Democrat Ralph Atchue tackled public education funding and charter schools.

Talitha Martin, MHS English teacher, asked Leach if he supports transparency in public dollars spent by charter schools.
Leach said he does, as outlined through state statute.

“(Charter schools) have their own rules. You may not like that, I get that. You may not like that, but that was set up in 1998 and that’s how it is,” Leach said.

Leach referenced an article from U.S. News and World Report that he said showed Legislative District 11 boasts nine of the top 29 schools in Arizona.

“Charters are filling up overnight. Why are they filling up? Because they are getting a better education,” Leach said.

Atchue challenged Leach’s claims.

“If things are so great in Arizona why are we losing teachers every day to other states?” Atchue asked.

Maricopa/Stanfield Justice Court Judge Lyle Riggs facilitated the non-primary governor debate between Kelly Fryer (D) and Ken Bennett (R), as well as the treasurer race featuring Republican Jo Ann Sabbagh, the first accountant to run for the position.

MHS Educator Rick Abel moderated candidates campaigning to be Superintendent of Public Instruction.

The race includes candidates with public and charter school backgrounds. The debate predictably touched on education funding and school safety, as well as improving services for gifted students.

The eight-hour marathon town hall event at Maricopa High School featured debates from 11 Arizona races. The event was organized by InMaricopa.com and broadcast live on Facebook. To view the full debates, visit the InMaricopa Facebook page.

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Candidates for the state House of Representatives in LD11 are (from left) incumbent Mark Finchem (R), Bret Roberts (R), Hollace Lyon (D), Barry McCain (D), Howell Jones (R)and Marcela Quiroz (D). Photo by Alayja Reynolds

Three Democrats and three Republicans are running for two seats in the state House of Representatives in Legislative District 11. Meet the candidates:

 

Republicans

Mark Finchem (incumbent)

Mark Finchem (submitted photo)

City of residence: Oro Valley
Years in the District: 10
Previous cities: Detroit and Kalamazoo, Michigan
Occupation/previous occupations: Legislator, Realtor, software manufacturing, firefighter/law enforcement
Family: Married with 4 children
Political background: Currently serving second term as representative for Legislative District 11.

Mark Finchem supplied the following information:
As a two-term Representative in LD-1 Mark Finchem has stood firm for personal freedoms, economic security, quality education and a debt-free future for constituents. Originally from the mid-west, Mark has leveraged his work experience in law enforcement, computer software security and real estate to serve people in many different ways. As the front runner for House Majority Leader in the coming legislature term, he will give southern Arizona a seat at the leadership table.


Howell Jones

Howell Jones (submitted photo)


City of residence: Rural Pinal County (Maricopa)
Years in the District: 5
Previous cities of residence: Phoenix
Occupation/previous occupations: Retired carpenter
Family: Four grown daughters and grandchildren.
Political background: None
Other community service: Served on the Michigan City Urban Enterprise Board of Directors.

How will your election benefit the residents of Maricopa?
I am the outsider who owes no one anything. I am able to act in the best interest of the people to promote growth in the area.

What do you think was the best accomplishment of the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
I know the budget was a big issue but for me it would have to be S.B. 1394. I am pro-life and anything that can be done to save one I think is very important.

What was your biggest disappointment in the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
The reason I am running is to stop the Legislature from putting out bills that look good on the surface but do nothing to fix the problem they were meant to address.

In the wake of the #RedForEd movement and the education bill, how would you describe the current relationship between Legislators and Arizona teachers?
From what I have seen in the news the relationship is not very good.

What is the greatest change you would like to see in any department of Arizona government?
I believe there is always room for improvement in all departments but I think ADOT could use special attention. They are doing a good job but without constant improvements thing can get decline quickly.

How are you more qualified for a House seat than your Primary Election rivals?
I am not saying I am more qualified but that I bring a different perspective to the seat and I believe in term limits.

How will you stay connected with the concerns of your constituents during your term?
I will encourage people email me with their concerns and problems. I will also be looking at town hall type meetings if I can get enough people to participate.


Bret Roberts

Bret Roberts (submitted photo)

City of residence: Maricopa
Years in the District: 9.5
Previous cities of residence: Gilbert, Chandler & Tempe
Occupation/previous occupations: Pinal County Constable
Family: Married with 3 grown children and a two-month-old baby girl.
Political background: I am a Precinct Committeeman, State Committeeman and have been State Delegate, Presidential Elector, Sgt. At Arms for the Pinal county Republican Committee as well as the District 4 Vice Chair
Other community service: 2013 Graduate of Maricopa Leadership Academy, the second person to achieve Platinum Status in the Maricopa Advocate Program. I have also volunteered for the F.O.R. Food Bank, For Our City Maricopa, Relay for Life, sponsored by the American Cancer Society & The Streets Don’t Love You Back a charitable organization.

How will your election benefit the residents of Maricopa?
First and foremost, my family and I have lived in the city of Maricopa since January of 2009. I have been serving, (pun intended) the city of Maricopa and the surrounding area as your elected Constable for going on four years now. As much as I can I intend to serve the constituents as equally as possible however, as a resident naturally you are a little more in tune with your immediate surroundings. Once elected I will continue to serve Maricopa’s residents in what I believe to be a more impactful position as their Representative at the legislature.

What do you think was the best accomplishment of the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
I am a supporter of education, and truly believe that education is one of the most critical issues in this state especially when it comes to economic development. Seeing that the legislature was able to get considerable additional revenue into Arizona’s education system with out raising our taxes is an impressive accomplishment.

What was your biggest disappointment in the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
One of Arizona’s most critical issues going on right now is most likely going largely unnoticed by most individuals outside of the agricultural community. To start it is a very complex issue, there are careers made on this one issue alone. For one reason or another one could say it doesn’t have that media spark to it like firearms or immigration. However, it is extremely important and only getting more so as time goes on. That issue is, water. We all need and use it. Even though I would like to have seen this issue resolved. It is a good thing that the proper time, care and consideration is being given to it. As the old saying goes “Whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting.”

In the wake of the #RedForEd movement and the education bill, how would you describe the current relationship between Legislators and Arizona teachers?
It’s a work in progress. I believe that almost all of us care about education. Where we may have a difference of opinion is how do we go about achieving the goal.

What is the greatest change you would like to see in any department of Arizona government?
This is a personal issue for our family and I would like nothing more than to find a way to make it easier, even if it’s only a small percentage of the approximately 17 thousand children in the foster system in Arizona.

About two years ago we attempted to adopt a child from an out of state family member. Unfortunately it didn’t work out. During that time, we were told that we were not closely enough related to avoid all the red tape even though the mother was willing. Essentially, we had to go through everything like we were strangers. I understand the system must look out for the welfare of the child, however if there is a family member willing to take a child even if they are ten times removed I believe they should be able to do so and be allowed to complete all the needed details after. Especially if this will keep the child or children with family instead of being placed in the foster system.

How are you more qualified for a House seat than your Primary Election rivals?
My diverse background which includes past business ownership, the financial sector, transportation and currently your elected constable will all afford me the opportunity to see the issues that come across your representative’s desk with the capability of seeing these issues from many different perspectives. I believe this will be an advantageous skill set to a legislator. I am involved all year round and not just when the election seasons rolls around. You see me at Fry’s and at Native Grill. I am a part of this community as much as it is a part of me.

How will you stay connected with the concerns of your constituents during your term?
I have been involved in the Maricopa community in many ways for several years now. I intend to continue to do so. Naturally, I have broadened my involvement to include the rest of legislative district eleven and I Have been to Marana, Oro Valley, Saddlebrooke, Arizona City & Picture Rocks numerous times over the past year. All while maintaining the responsibilities of my current role. I will continue to make myself available once elected.

Democrats

Hollace Lyon

Hollace Lyon (submitted photo)

City of residence: Pinal County with a Tucson address
Years in the District: 10
Previous cities of residence: All over the U.S. and in Belgium
Occupation/previous occupations: 7th grade math teacher, Retired Air Force colonel, IT consultant
Family: Married, no children, care for my 90 year old mother
Political background: Previously ran for the AZ House in 2014
Other community service: Co-founded and ran for four years, a charity golf tournament which raised over $60K for a Tucson non-profit. Member of Oro Valley American Legion, Post 132, member of NAACP.

How will your election benefit the residents of Maricopa?
Maricopa is a great community growing by leaps and bounds. Challenges are inherent with such rapid growth and the state must provide the investments in public education and modern infrastructure to help deal with those challenges. I will work to ensure real fiscal responsibility, where the taxpayers get what they are paying for, so that Maricopa has what it needs to manage its growth.

What do you think was the best accomplishment of the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
The increases to funding for public education. The continuance of Prop. 301 ensured our schools weren’t facing another cliff of lost funding in 2021, and the nine percent raise for teachers helped to begin to more appropriately compensate the most critical in-school factor for student achievement.

What was your biggest disappointment in the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
The inability of the Governor and Legislature to make any progress on dealing with our water crisis. Arizona is now in its 21st year of drought conditions, our mountain watersheds had the driest winter on record, flows in the Colorado River are well below normal this year, and Lake Mead is now reportedly less than two years away from hitting the 1,075 foot level which will drive significant cuts to the water supply for Pinal County agriculture and the state water bank.

Instead of actually working the solution, by refusing to develop an in-state plan with all stakeholders and not being fully engaged with the Western States Water Council, we risk not being at the table when decisions are made. Our state must speak with one voice and collaborate as a good partner with our neighbors to ensure we will have water when we need it.

In the wake of the #RedForEd movement and the education bill, how would you describe the current relationship between Legislators and Arizona teachers?
Teachers have a much better understanding of why our schools are still underfunded. They also know which legislators care about public education and which ones don’t, and they intend to hold those who don’t, accountable.

What is the greatest change you would like to see in any department of Arizona government?
If government is to do the work it needs to do, it must operate in an ethical manner with full transparency and accountability. That’s why I intend for my first piece of legislation to be about ethics reform.

How are you more qualified for a House seat than your Primary Election rivals?
I served 26 years in the Air Force, retiring as a Colonel. I commanded twice, taught war planning and while serving at NATO, and negotiated the deployment of nuclear planning assets between Turkey and Greece. While assigned to the Pentagon, I also negotiated a worldwide deal with Microsoft, which saved the Air Force $200 million and was lauded by the U.S. Senate as a model for our federal government.

I am a proven leader who knows how to reach across the aisle to get things done. I also understand the meaning of service and want to continue to serve, for the people of Maricopa and LD 11.

How will you stay connected with the concerns of your constituents during your term?
I’m glad you asked this question, because this is important to me. If elected, I will never forget that I work for my constituents. I intend to make myself available and responsive to my constituents in a variety of ways such as meetings on a rotating basis each Friday in LD 11’s various communities, regular email campaigns to keep constituents informed. I will also have an open door policy that encourages constituents to visit me at the Capitol.


Barry McCain

City of residence: Arizona City
Years in the District: 12
Previous cities of residence: Chandler
Occupation/previous occupations: Registered lobbyist for Arizona Veterans with Disabilities, U.S Navy (retired)
Political background: Ran for LD 11 in 2014 as a write-in candidate
Other community service: Pinal Partnership Transportation Committee

Barry McCain supplied the following information:
My name is Barry McCain. I am a born, raised and drafted out of Chandler High School. After a Navel Career I returned to my Arizona roots. Now, I am a Clean Elections Candidate for The Arizona House of Representatives in LD11; a Registered Lobbyist for Arizona Veterans With Disabilities and made sure the 347 was funded’ with the Mayor, at the State level because it is important to Maricopa. I also participate in Water and Transportation issue for the state.


Marcela Quiroz

Marcela Quiroz (submitted photo)

City of residence: Maricopa
Years in the District: 12
Previous cities of residence: Glendora and Colton, California
Occupation/previous occupations: Optician, Bank Teller, Substitute Teacher, SEI Teacher Coach, ELL Coordinator, Teacher.
Family: Married for 14 years, two adult children, a ten year old and legal guardian for special needs sibling.
Political background: N/A
Other community service: Religious Education teacher for 4 years. Volleyball Coach, Track Coach, and Club Sponsor. FOR volunteer. Maricopa Food Pantry Volunteer. Volunteer at Our Lady of Grace.

How will your election benefit the residents of Maricopa?
As a resident, I’m more than aware of the problems we face with the 347 and not having a 24-hour emergency room. I will support legislation that allows for 347 expansion, as well as legislation that creates opportunities for more medical businesses to come into Pinal County.

What do you think was the best accomplishment of the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
I’m a huge fan of Sen. Kate Brophy McGee, who sponsored senate bill SB 1390 renewing Prop. 301, a six-tenths of a percent sales tax for public schools.

What was your biggest disappointment in the most recent session of the Legislature and why?
My biggest disappointment was that the 20 by 2020 Teacher pay increase is not a permanent solution and was short sighted in how it defined a teacher, with no impact to everyone that works in public education, like district employees, front office staff, para professionals, therapists, coaches, or bus drivers.

In the wake of the #RedForEd movement and the education bill, how would you describe the current relationship between Legislators and Arizona teachers?
I think voters, not just teachers are ready to embrace legislators that are not working for special interest groups. Teachers have been open minded all along but are also now paying attention with eyes wide open.

What is the greatest change you would like to see in any department of Arizona government?
I would like to make sure departments other than the governor’s office are well paid as well as fully staffed, particularly in the area of corporate auditors.

How are you more qualified for a House seat than your Primary Election rivals?
I don’t see any of the candidates as rivals. I think we’re all very qualified. We’re all good people.

How will you stay connected with the concerns of your constituents during your term?
I will stay in contact as much as possible with the different LD11 Clubs and use google forms when I can to get feedback, but mostly, I would talk to the people.

 

Steve Smith (seated) listens to primary opponent Tiffany Shedd speak during a town hall session for U.S. Congressional District 1 facilitated by Mayor Christian Price (left). Photo by Victor Moreno

Engaged citizens quizzed nearly 40 candidates vying for federal, state and local offices Saturday in an InMaricopa.com Town Hall. Among them were three candidates who want to work in Washington, D.C.

Voters fired off questions in person, too, spanning hot-button issues like education, immigration, State Route 347 and healthcare.

Improving and creating opportunities for rural infrastructure projects was on the mind of a local politician not campaigning during the debate Aug. 4.

Pinal County Supervisor Anthony Smith asked candidates in the U.S. House of Representatives race what projects in Legislative District 11 they’d advocate for if elected to serve in Washington.

Steve Smith (R), current state senator and Maricopa resident who is campaigning to be a congressman, said State Route 347 and the proposed Interstate 11 are his priority projects.

“When President (Donald) Trump says, ‘I want to pledge $1 trillion of revenue growth to infrastructure,’ I’ve got a list of what we need done,” Steve Smith said.

Supplying electricity to the Navajo Nation, widening Interstate 10 and constructing off ramps through the Gila River Indian Reservation to improve opportunities for economic development were projects near to the heart of fellow Republican candidate Tiffany Shedd.

Shedd said she’d support the repeal of a 1930s-era labor law that “pushes costs of (federal) infrastructure projects through the roof.”

Maricopa’s overpass was funded partially from a $15 million federal TIGER grant, as well as $15 million in local contributions, and another $19 million from the Arizona Department of Transportation.

“We really need to repeal these draconian laws that drive the cost of a project up once federal money touches it, so that our rural communities can have enough to grab on to some of that infrastructure money and it doesn’t just go to cities like Phoenix, New York City, Los Angeles,” Shedd said.

Wendy Rogers, the third Republican in the U.S. Congress LD11 race, did not attend the debate though scheduled to appear.

Two Democrats and three Republicans are hoping for a job in the U.S. Senate, including Kyrsten Sinema (D), Deedra Abboud (D), Martha McSally (R), Kelli Ward (R) and former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio (R).

Ward, a former state senator, and the only participant in her race at the debate, faced-off with critics during a confrontational solo campaign appearance.

After discussing civility in politics and healthcare, Ward, in her statements about border security fired off against hecklers in the audience.

“I’d appreciate not being heckled by the left,” Ward said amid shouts from the crowd. “Is anyone not from the left who is heckling?”

U.S. Senate candidate Kelli Ward dealt with a partisan crowd at the town hall. Photo by Angelica Ramis

Maricopa resident Reid Martin answered back, proclaiming his political beliefs align with the Republican party as a moderate.

From the back of the room, Martin said he was frustrated with Ward’s decorum.

Martin said he’s been a registered Republican in every election but said this is the first election where that might change.

He said he came to the Town Hall to question candidates face-to-face.

“If you read enough and you follow these guys enough, our representatives are now running for federal level, you know where they’re going, you know what they voted for, but it’s different to actually hear it come out of their mouths and go on the record,” Martin said.

The eight-hour marathon town hall event at Maricopa High School featured debates from 11 Arizona races. The event was organized by InMaricopa.com and broadcast live on Facebook. To view the full debates, visit the InMaricopa Facebook page.

Nearly 40 candidates are lined up to participate in a Primary Election town hall Saturday in Maricopa.

InMaricopa.com Town Hall features federal, state and local races in three time-blocks at the Maricopa High School Performing Arts Center. The candidates will take questions directly from the audience. The event will be shown on Facebook Live starting at 10 a.m. on Facebook.com/InMaricopa, where viewers can also ask questions that may be relayed to the candidates as time permits. Viewers can also follow on Twitter and Instragram @InMaricopa.

The Town Hall begins at 10 a.m. All are invited to watch, listen and participate.

Facilitators include Mayor Christian Price, state Sen. Frank Pratt, Judge Lyle Riggs, educator Rick Abel and government relations specialist Janeen Rohovit of SRP.

Those in attendance who wish to question candidates will be asked to line up at a stationary microphone.

The facilitators will hold candidates and audience members to the same rules: 1. Be polite. 2. Stay on topic. 3. Be concise (don’t repeat yourself). Because this is a primary debate, candidates are encouraged to engage conversationally with primary opponents on the issues but not with candidates from other parties who may also be on stage.

Students from high school organizations including Student Council, Air Force Junior ROTC, Junior State of America, National Honor Society and the MHS Marching Band will play important roles in running the event. Also participating are members of the Be Awesome Youth Coalition, which will be selling water and hot dogs in the lobby.

The lobby will also be the place to meet many of the candidates as several have prepared campaign tables to share their message.

Block 1 involves candidates running for Congress. All three Republicans on the ballot for U.S. House of Representatives – Wendy Rogers, Tiffany Shedd and Steve Smith – have indicated their participation. Kelli Ward, a Republican, is the only U.S. Senate candidate to sign up and will take questions on her own.

Block 2, scheduled to start no sooner than 11 a.m., features state races.

Six of eight candidates seeking two seats on the Arizona Corporation Commission are scheduled to appear – Democrats Sandra Kennedy, Bill Mundell and Kiana Sears, and Republicans Justin Olson (an incumbent), Jim O’Connor and Eric Sloan.

They will be followed by all six candidates running for state representative in Legislative District 11 – Democrats Hollace Lyon, Barry McCain and Marcela Quiroz, and Republicans Mark Finchem (an incumbent), Howell Jones and Bret Roberts. Three of the candidates are Maricopa residents.

Though they have no primary competition, LD 11 Senate candidates Vince Leach, a Republican, and Ralph Atchue, a Democrat, will take audience questions.

Two governor candidates have agreed to appear – Republican Ken Bennett and Democrat Kelly Fryer. They will be followed by state treasurer candidate Jo Ann Sabbagh.

Five of seven candidates for state superintendent of public instruction are scheduled next. They are Republicans Bob Branch, Jonathan Gelbart and Frank Riggs, and Democrats Kathy Hoffman and David Shapira.

Block 3 includes county and city races and is expected to start after 2 p.m.

Republicans Scott McKee and Amanda Stanford (an incumbent) are the only candidates vying for the position of clerk of Pinal County Superior Court.

All three candidates for constable of the Maricopa/Stanfield Justice Court are expected to participate – Republicans Bill Griffin and Glenn Morrison and Democrat Andre LaFond.

To wind up the day of politics, seven city council candidates will take the stage – Linette Caroselli, Vincent Manfredi (an incumbent who is minority owner of InMaricopa), Bob Marsh, Cynthia Morgan, Paige Richie, Rich Vitiello and Henry Wade (an incumbent). They are running for three seats in a nonpartisan election.

The schedule is tentative. Learn about the Town Hall at MaricopaEvents.com.

Maricopa High School is hosting the InMaricopa.com Town Hall Aug. 4 at the MHS Performing Arts Center. The free event is open to the public and will feature at least 33 candidates in 10 races.

IF YOU GO
What:
Primary Election Town Hall
When:  Saturday, Aug. 4
Where: Maricopa High School Performing Arts Center, 45012 W. Honeycutt Ave. | Maricopa, AZ 85139
Format: Town Hall
Schedule (tentative) and participating candidates
Cost: Free
RSVP: MaricopaEvents.com
Facilitators: Mayor Christian Price, Judge Lyle Riggs, Janeen Rohovit
Questions: 520-568-0040, Raquel@InMaricopa.com

Maricopa High School is hosting the InMaricopa.com Town Hall Aug. 4 at the MHS Performing Arts Center. The free event is open to the public and will feature at least 32 candidates in 10 races.

Among the candidates who have committed to attend are all three Republican candidates for U.S. Congress District 1, six candidates for Arizona Corporation Commission, which regulates utility services, and seven candidates for Maricopa City Council.

“Our mission is to prepare students to be lifelong learners and responsible citizens, and this town hall will not only provide such opportunities for our students but for all residents of Maricopa,” said Maricopa Unified School District Superintendent Tracey Lopeman. “Government affects every facet of our lives – especially public education – and to make the changes we want in our society, it’s imperative we be educated on and engaged in the political process.”

Candidates will take questions from the audience in attendance and watching live through social media. InMaricopa.com Editor Raquel Hendrickson said the town hall format would allow voters latitude to challenge the candidates about their positions. “We want to markedly reduce the role of the moderator and let citizens get the answers to questions they want to ask. We want a format that would allow candidates to more fully engage with each other on the issues.”

The Town Hall will be separated into time blocks. The first block starts at 10 a.m. with Congressional District 1 GOP candidates Wendy Rogers, Tiffany Shedd and Steve Smith. Gubernatorial candidates Ken Bennett and Kelly Fryer as well as candidates for superintendent of public instruction, treasurer and Corporation Commission will also participate. The three Republicans seeking two seats in the Arizona House have confirmed their participation, as have all candidates for city council and constable.

“Our goal is to inform our readers and viewers,” Hendrickson said. “Our community will be much better served if we go to the polls with an understanding of the issues and the candidates who want to represent us in public office.”

Among the facilitators for the Town Hall are Maricopa Mayor Christian Price and Judge Lyle Riggs. They will enforce simple rules that apply to the candidates and audience alike: Be respectful, be succinct, stay on topic and don’t repeat yourself.

Price, a three-term mayor whose term runs through 2020, invites Maricopans and those from outside the city to attend: “Join me Aug. 4 to learn about the people wanting to represent you and your family in public office.”

Please RSVP at MaricopaEvents.com.


 

 

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Kyrsten Sinema, Doug Ducey and Steve Gaynor have large receipts for the first quarter in their respective races.

(Candidates ranked by receipts)

Federal Offices
(January 2017-March 2018 receipts)

U.S. Senate

Kyrsten Sinema (D)
Cash balance: $6,688,670
Receipts: $6,552,764
Disbursements: $2,127,728.43
Debts owed: $0

Martha McSally (R)
Cash balance: $2,578,746
Receipts: $3,377,931
Disbursements: $799,184
Debts owed: $0

Kelli Ward (R)
Cash balance: $432,553
Receipts: $1,980,775
Disbursements: $1,600,150
Debts owed: $127,652

Joe Arpaio (R)
Cash balance: $254,938
Receipts: $503,191
Disbursements: $248,252
Debts owed: $0

Deedra Abboud (D)
Cash balance at: $16,423
Receipts: $63,952
Disbursements: $47,530
Debts owed: $98,095

U.S. Congress AZ District 1

Tom O’Halleran (D)
Cash balance: $885,083
Receipts: $1,327,921
Disbursements: $460,129
Debts owed: $0

Tiffany Shedd (R)
Cash balance: $250,583
Receipts: $339,600
Disbursements: $89,016
Debts owed: $150,000

Steve Smith (R)
Cash balance: $244,541
Receipts: $307,778
Disbursements: $63,236
Debts owed: $0

Wendy Rogers (R)
Cash balance: $201,317
Receipts: $238,543
Disbursements: $42,215
Debts owed: $0

Miguel Olivas (D)
Has filed no first-quarter reports

State Offices
(January-March 2018 receipts)

Governor

Doug Ducey (R)
Cash balance: $2,678,448
Cash receipts: $549,965
Cash disbursements: $220,817
Loans received: $0

Steve Farley (D)
Cash balance: $309,010
Cash receipts: $265,192
Cash disbursements: $188,542
Loans received: $0

David Garcia (D)
Cash balance: $184,925.97
Cash receipts: $238,551.58
Cash disbursements: $135,538.67
Loans received: $0

Kelly Fryer (D)
Cash balance: $48,419.19
Cash receipts for: $88,395.30
Cash disbursements: $39,976.11
Loans received: $0

Noah Parker Dyer (I)
Cash balance: $19,380.17
Cash receipts: $35,868.25
Cash disbursements: $18,876.71
Loans received: $46,429.55

Ken Bennett (R)*
Has filed no first-quarter reports

Secretary of State

Steve Gaynor (R)
Cash balance: $557,179
Cash receipts: $623,000
Cash disbursements: $65,821
Loans received: $620,000

Michele Reagan (R)
Cash balance: $451,706
Cash receipts: $75,230
Cash disbursements: $91,055
Loans received: $0

Katie Hobbs (D)
Cash balance: $169,228
Cash receipts: $115,206
Cash disbursements: $62,437
Loans received: $0

Mark Robert Gordon (D)
Cash balance: $40,608
Cash receipts: $54,118
Cash disbursements: $40,203
Loans received: $0

Attorney General

Mark Brnovich (R)
Cash balance: $453,067
Cash receipts: $112,750
Cash disbursements: $43,206.57
Loans received: $0

January Contreras (D)
Cash balance: $162,550
Cash receipts: $124,443
Cash disbursements: $68,443
Lon received: $0

Treasurer

Kimberly Yee (R)
Cash balance: $539,685
Cash receipts: $17,490
Cash disbursements: $17,805
Loans received: $400,000

Mark Manoil (D)*
Cash balance: $5,365
Cash receipts: $9,330
Cash disbursements: $6,142
Loans received: $0

Mark Cardenas (D)
Cash balance: $6,515
Cash receipts: $6,515
Cash disbursements: $0
Loans received: $0

Superintendent of Public Instruction

Jonathan Gelbart (R)
Cash balance: $70,778
Cash receipts: $9,375
Cash disbursements: $6,468
Loans received: $25,000

David Schapira (D)*
Cash balance: $59,619
Cash receipts: $100,034
Cash disbursements: $58,290
Loans received: $0

Frank Riggs (R)
Cash balance: $27,386
Cash receipts: $28,790
Cash disbursements: $2,224
Loans received: $46,800

Kathy Hoffman (D)
Cash balance: $11,573
Cash receipts: $11,857
Cash disbursements: $6,220
Loans received: $0

Diane Douglass (R)
Cash balance: $6,004
Cash receipts: $2,405
Cash disbursements: $685
Loans received: $1,300

Mine Inspector

Joe Hart (R)
Cash balance: $544
Cash receipts: $4,090
Cash disbursements: $4,500
Loans received: $1,000

Bill Pierce (D)*
Cash balance: $2,365
Cash receipts: $826
Cash disbursements: $202
Loans received: $0

Corporation Commissions

Kiana Sears (D)*
Cash balance: $101,965
Cash receipts: $104,167
Cash disbursements: $9,232
Loans received: $0

Rodney Glassman (R)
Cash balance: $366,661
Cash receipts: $66,001
Cash disbursements: $36,547
Loans received: $100,000

James O’Connor (R)*
Cash balance: $4,696
Cash receipts: $12,435
Cash disbursements: $13,123
Loans received: $0

Bill Mundell (D)*
Cash balance: $13,158
Cash receipts: $7,530
Cash disbursements: $1,764
Loans received: $0

Sandra Kennedy (D)*
Cash balance: $5,562
Cash receipts: $5,060
Cash disbursements: $118
Loans received: $0

Eric Sloan (R)
Cash balance: $3,094
Cash receipts: $2,465
Cash disbursements: $75
Loans received: $0

Tom Forese (R)
Cash balance: $620,057
Cash receipts: $1,000
Cash disbursements: $2,447
Loans received: $0

Arizona Senate District 11

Ralph Atchue (D)*
Cash balance: $17,283
Cash receipts: $15,720
Cash disbursements: $1,215
Loans received: $0

Vince Leach (R)
Cash balance: $114,272
Cash receipts: $12,775
Cash disbursements: $2,547
Loans received: $0

Arizona House District 11

Hollace (Holly) Lyon (D)
Cash balance: $70,547
Cash receipts: $24,823
Cash disbursements: $4,605
Loans received: $0

Mark Finchem (R)
Cash balance: $23,062
Cash receipts: $5,363
Cash disbursements: $3,253
Loans received: $0

Bret Roberts (R)*
Cash balance: $4,488
Cash receipts: $1,965
Cash disbursements: $305
Loans received: $350

Bridger Kimball (R)
Cash balance: $1,720
Cash receipts: $2,100
Cash disbursements: $2,583
Loans received: $0

Barry McCain (D)*
Cash balance: $0
Cash receipts: $0
Cash disbursements: $0
Loans received: $0

Marcela Quiroz (D)* – interim report
Cash balance: $0
Cash receipts: $0
Cash disbursements: $0
Loans received: $0

Howell W. Jones (R)
Filed no first-quarter reports

*Clean elections candidate


This item appears in the June issue of InMaricopa.

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For those who opted not to vote early, here are the polling places for the Maricopa area precincts for Tuesday’s Primary Election:

Precinct 30: Desert Wind Middle School, 35565 W. Honeycutt Road

Precinct 54: Thunderbird Farms Volunteer Fire Department, 12356 N. Ralston Road

Precinct 73: Santa Rosa Elementary School, 21400 N. Santa Rosa Drive

Precinct 74: Pima Butte Elementary School, 42202 W. Rancho El Dorado Parkway

Precinct 77: Ak-Chin Government Center, 48227 W. Farrell Road

Precinct 78: Maricopa Community Church, 44977 W. Hathaway Ave.

Precinct 79: Villages at Rancho El Dorado, 20991 N. Butterfield Parkway

Precinct 80: Global Water Center, 22590 N. Powers Parkway

Precinct 90: Maricopa Unified School District Office, 44150 W. Maricopa-Casa Grande Highway

Precinct 100 (temporary): Maricopa Wells Middle School gym, 45725 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Precinct 101: Maricopa Wells Middle School, 45725 W. Honeycutt Ave.

Precinct 102: Legacy Traditional School, 17760 N. Regent Road

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The Primary Election is Aug. 30. Early ballots should be mailed by Thursday.

Pinal County Recorder Virginia Ross is reminding voters of some important dates coming up for this year’s Primary Election.

“If a person wants to vote early in person, they will have to cast their vote no later than 5 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 26,” Ross said.  “We have three convenient locations in Pinal County where registered voters can place their ballot.”

Voter Registration Office – Florence
31 North Pinal Street
Mon – Fri, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Pinal County Recorder’s Office – Apache Junction
575 North Idaho Road, Suite #800
Mon – Fri, 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Pinal County Recorder’s Office – Casa Grande
820 E Cottonwood Lane, Suite A-2
Mon – Fri, 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM

“For those who have early ballots, you should mail them in no later than Thursday, Aug. 25,” Ross stated.  “If we received them by 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 30, they will be counted.  If you can’t mail them off by the 25th, any Pinal County voting location can take them and they will be counted.”

For more information on voting in Pinal County, visit: http://pinalcountyaz.gov/elections/Pages/home.aspx.

voter-numbers-graph

State Sen. Steve Smith

By Sen. Steve Smith

I have been asked who I am endorsing in various contested races in the Aug. 30 primary election.  This year it is particularly difficult in some races because it means choosing between friends and colleagues, but since we all only get one vote, here are the candidates I am supporting:

U.S. Senate: Dr. Kelli Ward.  I have served with Kelli in the Legislature and I know first-hand that she is a strong conservative through and through and is a tenacious worker and fighter.  After 30 years in the Senate, I think it is time for John McCain to step aside to let us embrace a new voice in Washington.

U.S. Congress: Sheriff Paul Babeu.  As the commanding officer in the Army, Paul Babeu helped secure the Yuma sector in Arizona by stopping 94 percent of the illegal alien activity and smuggling and has continued that fight as sheriff.  No one in the race has done or will do more to secure our border and I believe the unsecure border is one of the biggest threats facing our nation.

Pinal County SheriffSteve Henry.  As the Chairman of the Senate Public Safety and Military Committee, I have worked with Chief Deputy Steve Henry on many issues relating to public safety and he is highly knowledgeable, experienced, tough on crime, and I believe he is going to do a great job as sheriff.

Pinal County Attorney: Lando Voyles.  As our current county attorney, Lando has made Pinal County the safest county in Arizona for our children and he has worked side-by-side with me in the fight for landmark public safety legislation in Arizona.  Lando also happens to be one of the most honest, principled and patriotic men I know, which in the world of politics is a rarity.

Pinal County Board of Supervisors: Anthony Smith.  Being named ‘Champion of the Taxpayer’ for his strong voting record, Anthony has and will continue to protect our wallets from attempts to increase our taxes and he will continue to work hard for us in Pinal County.

Maricopa City Council: Bridger Kimball & Nancy Smith.  Both Bridger and Nancy have done an exemplary job on our City Council by asking the tough questions and standing strong on good policy for our city and deserve to be re-elected.


Steve Smith is a state senator representing District 11 and a resident of Maricopa.