How to justify an early eviction

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Before a lease expires, landlords might have valid reasons to evict a tenant — but they should not take this decision lightly. It can take a legal and financial toll on all involved.

The landlord must closely follow certain laws and maintain respectful and clear communication when evicting the tenant. The landlord should also carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eviction.

Here are three situations when the landlord may want to pursue an early eviction:

  1. Failure to pay rent on time and in full. Because the tenant is obligated to pay rent on time and in full every month, non-payment is a common reason for eviction. If rent is not paid by the due date, the landlord can issue a notice to pay or vacate. This gives the tenant a brief window to settle the outstanding rent or move out. Failure to comply means the landlord can file for eviction in court.
  2. Significant damage to the property. The tenant has is responsible for keeping the property in good condition and reporting any maintenance issues to the landlord. When the tenant causes damage to the property and makes it less valuable, safe or livable, the landlord can issue a notice to make repairs or move out. If the tenant fails to comply, the landlord can file for eviction in court.
  3. Violating the lease terms. The lease contains terms and conditions that the tenant must follow. That could mean stipulations about unauthorized pets, guests or sublets, smoking inside the home, causing excessive noise and engaging in illegal activity. If the terms of the lease are violated, the landlord can send the tenant a notice to remedy or leave the property. If the tenant does not do either, the landlord can file for eviction in court.
    If you are having challenges managing your tenant, consider hiring a professional property manager. Please reach out to us at Crest Premier Property Management Team.